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Old 01-27-2018, 07:55 AM
 
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Living in Boston all of my life, I have two easy answers -

The current 17 year run of the New England Patriots, and the Celtics of the 50's/60's who ate Championships for breakfast are two of the greatest runs ever in team sports.

There have been others. Jack Nicklaus in golf was a great career. Roger Federer and Serena Williams in tennis, neither flash in the pans but solid long careers. Dale Earnhardt Nascar.

What other individuals or teams do you believe have had historically great runs?
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Old 01-27-2018, 06:46 PM
 
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richard petty, drove in nascar from 1959 to 1992, won 200 cup races and seven championships, ten cup wins at daytona, seven of which were in the daytona 500. he also won 27 races in one season in the cup series(1967).
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Old 01-28-2018, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas
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I know you've mentioned them already but I have to highlight two excellent runs of greatness:
New England Patriots (2001-Present): Unrivaled greatness for over a decade and a half. 5 Super Bowl wins (at least), 8 Super Bowl appearences, 12 AFCCG appearances, an undefeated regular season, and the GOAT head coach and player on the team. Come Super Bowl Sunday Tom Brady will have started in 15% of all Super Bowls and the Patriots will have played in 20% of all Super Bowls.

Roger Federer: This year's AO was the 200th Slam of the GS era, Fed has accounted for 10% of all Slam wins the past 50 years. Fed has won 27% of all GS this century. 20 Grand Slams. A career Grand Slam. 302 weeks at #1. 96 individual titles. 1,139 matches won. Since he won his first Wimbledon in 2003 he has been on a tear unlike anything else in sports. The unquestioned GOAT in tennis history and perhaps the greatest athlete of all time (I rank him just below Gretzky). Simply a legend.
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Old 01-28-2018, 09:41 AM
 
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As far as MLB, I have to go with the New York Yankees. From 1949 to 1962 they were in the World Series 12 times, winning 9 of them.

As far as the NHL, I would go with the Montreal Canadians. From 1956 to 1979, they won the Stanley Cup 15 times in a 24 year span.
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Old 01-28-2018, 10:07 AM
 
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Impossible to have this sort of thread without putting UCLA's run under John Wooden near the forefront of the conversation.
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Old 01-28-2018, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Under Moon & Star
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New York Yankees, 1926 thru 1965
Forty consecutive winning seasons. In the first 39 years of that stretch, they only finished worse than 3rd once (4th place in 1945) in the eight-team American League. 19 World Series championships and 26 American League pennants.

Tiger Woods, 1999 thru 2006
11 majors out of 29. The Tiger Slam. Total dominance - at one point he held the record for the lowest score in each of the four majors. When he won the U.S. Open in 2000, he became the first player ever to record a score double-digits under par in that event (-12). And, no, the course was not playing easy - it was so hard that year that second place was +3.

Wayne Gretzky, 1979 thru 1986
League MVP his first eight seasons in the NHL. 70+ goals four consecutive seasons. Averaged over 2 points/game over than entire period (only one other player, Mario Lemieux, has ever averaged 2+ ppg for so much as a single season).

Phil Jackson, coaching career
20 seasons, 20 winning seasons, never missing the playoffs. 11 titles. 18 seasons winning at least one postseason series.
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Old 01-30-2018, 05:29 PM
 
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For me it's my 1980-1983 NY Islanders. Only American team to win 4 straight cups. Something that will never happen again
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Old 01-31-2018, 04:05 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sithlord72 View Post
For me it's my 1980-1983 NY Islanders. Only American team to win 4 straight cups. Something that will never happen again
I remember that even though i was not that big of a Hockey Fan...

Aside from the ones already mentioned...
i would add
The Bulls (NBA) 6 titles with Jordan.
The Yankees (MLB) 5 titles with Jeter.
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Old 01-31-2018, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Island of Misfit Toys
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80s Lakers with Magic. For a decade the nba title somehow or another went through the Lakers.

People won't like it but, Lance Armstrong's 7 tour wins. Doping or not that's impossibly difficult to do and let's face it - the entire peloton was doping as well.
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Old 01-31-2018, 08:31 AM
 
30,881 posts, read 24,210,085 times
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here is a good one that few probably know about;

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pop_McKale

Quote:
James Fred "Pop" McKale (June 12, 1887 – June 1, 1967) was an American football and baseball player, coach of football, basketball, baseball, and track, and college athletics administrator. He is best known for his four-decade association with the University of Arizona. He served as athletic director at U of A from 1914 to 1957. He served as Arizona's head football coach from 1914 to 1930, compiling a record of 80–32–6. McKale was also the head basketball coach at Arizona from 1914 to 1921, tallying a mark of 49–12, and the head baseball coach at the school from 1915 to 1919 and again from 1922 to 1949, amassing a record of 304–118–7. McKale was inducted into the Arizona Sportsmen Hall of Fame in 1959 and was a charter member of the Arizona Sports Hall of Fame, inducted in 1976. The McKale Center, the University of Arizona's home basketball venue, was opened in 1973 and named in McKale's honor.
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