U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Sports
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-28-2022, 05:25 PM
 
Location: AZ
17 posts, read 12,185 times
Reputation: 16

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by macroy View Post
Most bags come with dual-strap these days. And you might as well just have that - if you need to, you can just choose to not use the double-strap. I'm an avid walker on the course, and I only will put the 2nd strap on when I'm walking longer distances (after my drive or between holes). But when I look for a bag, a double strap is not even a consideration - it's expected.

You asked about riding/walking. That's personal preference. I think if you want to walk you'll need to think about if you want to carry, or be part of the "push-cart mafia". Push carts have become very popular as they allow you to walk and carry more things without having to carry it all (and can affect your lower back as the day goes on). I would recommend you look at Clickgear as they are really nice. They are not "cheap" to begin with ($300+). But - if you play often, it'll pay for itself in a few months compared to riding. Here on the east coast - a cart is about $25 for 18 holes. So having a push cart will pay for itself in about a dozen rounds. You can also get a bunch of accessories for your push-cart (umbrella attachments, cup/tumbler holders, coolers, etc.).

If you go with a push-cart, then you have more options in terms of the bag. As in you can also look a the options of a "cart bag". They are bigger and heavier, but have more room for clubs and other things (some will not even come with a stand). For those of us that walk more, we tend to go with more lightweight bags that have the stands. They tend to be pricier (relatively speaking in terms of storage space) due to the lightweight materials and extra features. And honestly - depending on how often you play, you may need to replace it more often. Just something to think about.
Great info! Decisions, decisions. I guess I'll know when I get to the store and look at them all and actually try to lift one, put it on my back and/or push one. I bet that will be telling very quickly.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-28-2022, 05:38 PM
 
Location: AZ
17 posts, read 12,185 times
Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quick Enough View Post
"Always use a glove."

To each their OWN.

Freddie Couples doesn't wear one, and he's done OK.

I don't wear one either.

Take lessens BEFORE you start to play. It is much harder to correct a mistake. Especially if you don't know how and what you are doing wrong.

Buy cheap stuff FIRST. You might decide you don't like golf after all.
On the massive to-do list...look into setting up golf lessons soon! Watching some youtube videos on grip lately and apparently I self taught myself the wrong grip many years ago. Haven't held a club in quite some time so I think a lesson is in order.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-28-2022, 05:44 PM
 
Location: AZ
17 posts, read 12,185 times
Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Camaro5 View Post
For a new player there isn't a need to get a precise club fitting because the swing will change as they get better. Most important is to have the right length and the right flex in the shaft. Look for a game-improvement kind of club as they're easier to hit and get the ball in the air. Brand is not that important.

Set makeup should be 6-SW, a hybrid or two, a fairway wood or two, driver & putter. Forget about long irons for the time being.

Any kind of lightweight bag that's big enough to hold a full set of clubs will be good. Dual straps if you walk, a cart bag if you ride.

You don't have to spend a lot of money to get started. Just look for the right kind of gear that fits you and is right for your level of play.

Good info! Golf is complicated! But I bet as you get more into it, it starts making more sense... at least I hope so.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-28-2022, 11:16 PM
 
Location: Southern Nevada
5,789 posts, read 2,523,847 times
Reputation: 8659
Quote:
Originally Posted by nic1212 View Post
Good info! Golf is complicated! But I bet as you get more into it, it starts making more sense... at least I hope so.
The hardest part of golf is that you have (up to) 14 clubs in the bag and each one hits the ball a different distance on a different trajectory. Then there are all the different kinds of shots. Yes, it is complicated but at first just learn to get the ball in the air and learn how far you hit each club.

It is a game of opposites. Hit down and the ball goes up. Try and lift it in the air and you'll hit worm burners. Swing to the left and the ball goes to the right. Swing easy and the ball goes farther. It is the only game where a negative score is better.

One thing to mention -- if/when you go to get a putter, go to a Golf Galaxy or someplace and ask them to fit you for putter length. The correct length will get your eyes over the ball where they should be and it's easier to swing back and through on a straight line. Also, don't waste your money on training aids or devices. Most of them don't work, except for a putting mirror that you can use at home. Save your money for lessons or time at the range.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2022, 05:31 AM
 
52,752 posts, read 22,512,146 times
Reputation: 12688
Quote:
Originally Posted by Camaro5 View Post
The hardest part of golf is that you have (up to) 14 clubs in the bag and each one hits the ball a different distance on a different trajectory. Then there are all the different kinds of shots. Yes, it is complicated but at first just learn to get the ball in the air and learn how far you hit each club.

It is a game of opposites. Hit down and the ball goes up. Try and lift it in the air and you'll hit worm burners. Swing to the left and the ball goes to the right. Swing easy and the ball goes farther. It is the only game where a negative score is better.

One thing to mention -- if/when you go to get a putter, go to a Golf Galaxy or someplace and ask them to fit you for putter length. The correct length will get your eyes over the ball where they should be and it's easier to swing back and through on a straight line. Also, don't waste your money on training aids or devices. Most of them don't work, except for a putting mirror that you can use at home. Save your money for lessons or time at the range.
" ask them to fit you for putter length. The correct length will get your eyes over the ball"

I suggest you try different length putters before you buy. Putting is more about "feel" then anything else.

My favorite turned out to be a gag gift putter I got, designed for a child, at about 2 1/2 feet in length, I got and I am 5'8".
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-01-2022, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Southern Nevada
5,789 posts, read 2,523,847 times
Reputation: 8659
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quick Enough View Post

I suggest you try different length putters before you buy. Putting is more about "feel" then anything else.

My favorite turned out to be a gag gift putter I got, designed for a child, at about 2 1/2 feet in length, I got and I am 5'8".
This is bad advice. You need the correct length putter to get the proper setup at the address position. Without the proper setup you haven't got a chance. Sure, you can use a very short putter but your back will be shot by the end of the round. Just ask Michelle Wei how that worked out.

The feel in putting comes from the design of the putter, the style of the neck, and the type of insert if it has one. 99% of pro golfers, even the ones that use the long putters, have their eyes over the ball.

I don't give advice lightly. I am certified by Mitchell Golf Institute as a professional club fitter & technician, play to a 4 handicap, and a former club champion. I have worked with world class instructor Butch Harmon and putting guru Todd Sones. I have been doing this for many years.

You can go putt with a whisk broom if you want to, but telling a beginner to use a 2 1/2 foot putter is extremely bad advice.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2022, 05:46 AM
 
52,752 posts, read 22,512,146 times
Reputation: 12688
Quote:
Originally Posted by Camaro5 View Post
This is bad advice. You need the correct length putter to get the proper setup at the address position. Without the proper setup you haven't got a chance. Sure, you can use a very short putter but your back will be shot by the end of the round. Just ask Michelle Wei how that worked out.

The feel in putting comes from the design of the putter, the style of the neck, and the type of insert if it has one. 99% of pro golfers, even the ones that use the long putters, have their eyes over the ball.

I don't give advice lightly. I am certified by Mitchell Golf Institute as a professional club fitter & technician, play to a 4 handicap, and a former club champion. I have worked with world class instructor Butch Harmon and putting guru Todd Sones. I have been doing this for many years.

You can go putt with a whisk broom if you want to, but telling a beginner to use a 2 1/2 foot putter is extremely bad advice.
"This is bad advice"

I did my BEST putting with it.

I was so good with it I was always the last to putt in tournaments after every body else missed.

I also remember all the flack Bryson DeChambeau got for using the same length clubs for his irons.

Look at how that turned out! A lot of "experts" ate a LOT of crow!

NOT saying your suggestion is bad, only saying 1 size does NOT fit all.

A new golfer should try all sorts of things to find what is best for HIM/HER!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2022, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
13,015 posts, read 10,319,409 times
Reputation: 18845
Quote:
Originally Posted by NORTY FLATZ View Post
OP~
It sounds like you're getting some good golf tips regarding the things you may need.

Get a book on golf etiquette. You'll want to know these before you're on a course.

Tip~ Since you're in the Phoenix area, you're well aware of the weather trends there. And, since you're a hiker, you know the importance of hydration. Golf is no different. The "Greens fees" are different depending upon the season. (Summer= lower, Winter= higher.) So, to extend this "golfing season" bring along a towel (dish sized) and dunk it in each water hazard, then drape it around your neck. By the time the next water hazard shows it, it'll be dry anyway.
Maybe desert courses are different, but GROSS. I'd occasionally dip my caddy towel in the water hazard if it was really hot and windy and it dried out between water coolers but now way would I wear that around my neck. All I'll say is, the amount of chemicals sprayed on the course all run into the water hazards, and that sounds like a great way to stain your shirts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Camaro5 View Post
This is bad advice. You need the correct length putter to get the proper setup at the address position. Without the proper setup you haven't got a chance. Sure, you can use a very short putter but your back will be shot by the end of the round. Just ask Michelle Wei how that worked out.

The feel in putting comes from the design of the putter, the style of the neck, and the type of insert if it has one. 99% of pro golfers, even the ones that use the long putters, have their eyes over the ball.

I don't give advice lightly. I am certified by Mitchell Golf Institute as a professional club fitter & technician, play to a 4 handicap, and a former club champion. I have worked with world class instructor Butch Harmon and putting guru Todd Sones. I have been doing this for many years.

You can go putt with a whisk broom if you want to, but telling a beginner to use a 2 1/2 foot putter is extremely bad advice.
Depends how tall she is. The normal range is 32-35 inches...so 30 inches is short but if you're 5'5?

Honestly I feel like its like getting measured for a shoe. You have an idea where you're at size wise, you know what feels right. Does the angle of the neck work? Is your eye over the ball? Are you comfortable in the position? You can measure, to an extent, but you can also figure it out with a rack of putters most likely.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Sports
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top