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Old 07-28-2008, 02:55 PM
 
1 posts, read 3,662 times
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Default How to soften a hee-haw?

It sounds like you know your mini donks well. We purchased a 2 yr old gelding a year ago. He gets along well with our pony, bosses our qtr horse around, and chases our pygmy goats, but they have a safety zone to get away from him when they need to. He is cute as the dickens and looks deeply into our eyes when we talk to him -- just like he totally understands everything we say; BUT we're only on an acre (in a subdivision) AND his bray is as loud as a giant donkey's. I'm wondering if we need to get him a jenny to keep him quiet or if we'd just have 2 loud brayers. He's not that noisy during the day-time. We'd like to keep him quiet at night, but to do this we have to shut him in the barn at night because he has to "comment" about every new movement around him at night. He's usually quiet from dark to dawn when we put him in the barn. Any suggestions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by firebll31 View Post
Yes, I think they can all "just get along" just make sure the dogs are leashed and the donkeys on leads, so everyone is under control. Let the introductions begin, and make sure the dogs are friendly, not lunging or barking, just sniffing. Take it slow, and let them get to know each other. Watch the body language, they will let you know when everyone is on good terms. Once the dogs know the donkeys BELONG here and the donks know the dogs aren't dangerous, they should all be friends. Pyrenees don't tend to be overly yappy and jumpy, which will help.
I live in Carthage, between Joplin and Springfield. My donks live just west of town at my in-laws. The Dyno-Nobel explosives plant (where my hubby works) owns about 1200 acres there, mostly wooded, no hunting. There are abundant deer, raccoons, turkeys, bobcats and possibly a cougar. I have seen the bobcats twice while driving. Its very odd because normally they are secretive animals, mostly active at night. This one was about 75 yards from my sister-in-laws house, he had chased a rabbit under the wall and was growling at the donks who were braying at HIM. They got a pic of him before the rabbit jumped out and he ran away.
Sassy also steals halters and lead ropes left carelessly on the ground, grabs my horse's tail and races him around the field. He lopes along, while her legs are going ninety-to-nothing with her ears laid back. She will hold just about anything in her mouth if I roll it in cookie crumbs first. Sorry I ramble on-can you tell I love my critters?!

Image of Sassy and Bo - Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting


Image of Julie and Tess - Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
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Old 07-30-2008, 11:09 AM
 
Location: SW MO
1,238 posts, read 2,916,224 times
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You are correct, a second donkey would only get you a braying duet any time a person or moving car was sighted. And heaven help you if you took only 1 out of the field at a time! Usually the one left behind will fuss until reunited. Mine serve as a watch-dog to the house, letting them know when company drives up. They are so people oriented that they talk to anyone outside. Maybe this is because they are spoiled with cookies? I think this is just a natural thing that you have to deal with. My 18 month old niece lives where my donkeys are, and does a remarkable imitation of a bray. No fake "Hee-haw" for her! Most people find it comical and don't mind too much unless they are day-sleepers. You might interview your closest neighbors to find out if it really is a problem. And take a batch of chocolate chip cookies with you as a peace offering!
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Old 08-05-2008, 10:40 AM
 
Location: SW Missouri
14,799 posts, read 17,229,096 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tambre View Post
Wow, so I would be willing to put up with a small herd of sheep....so I could get "more than one mini donkey" to protect them of course...so how can I convince my husband we need some sheep. Great photos! So cute, who could resist? (except for those happy bachelor types Do they do well in a pasture with cows...the mini donkeys, not the happy bachelor types?
If you do get sheep (and everybody needs them), please get a breed of sheep that has good wool for hand spinners! There is nothing worse than hair sheep (can you tell I am a hand spinner? LOL). Shetland sheep are very nice and they have fantastic fiber which you can sell or, even better, learn to spin wool yourself! It's a wonderful and useful hobby. Shetland sheep are very easy to take care of as they are more of a primitive type of sheep (they have not had the brains bred out of them). They are quite resistent to disease and are great mothers.

As for miniature donkeys. I'm sure they do better in pairs. They make great guard animals for sheep and goats (I am told by an old farmer that they will kill a coyote just for the FUN of it). LOL You can also use them for other things like learning to pull a plow, skidding logs, or anything that requires pulling strength. I have read online that it is not a good idea to ride them (like a horse) as they really should not carry more than a hundred pounds or so directly on their back. You can pack them, however, with much more weight than that because the weight is distributed more evenly.

As soon as I can I am going to be able to stay home more, we're definitely thinking about getting some sheep and a donk or two. Remember though, that they are LOUD! So I would at least warn my neighbors. LOL

20yrsinBranson
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Old 08-05-2008, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Not on the same page as most
2,499 posts, read 3,731,556 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
If you do get sheep (and everybody needs them), please get a breed of sheep that has good wool for hand spinners! There is nothing worse than hair sheep (can you tell I am a hand spinner? LOL). Shetland sheep are very nice and they have fantastic fiber which you can sell or, even better, learn to spin wool yourself! It's a wonderful and useful hobby. Shetland sheep are very easy to take care of as they are more of a primitive type of sheep (they have not had the brains bred out of them). They are quite resistent to disease and are great mothers.

As for miniature donkeys. I'm sure they do better in pairs. They make great guard animals for sheep and goats (I am told by an old farmer that they will kill a coyote just for the FUN of it). LOL You can also use them for other things like learning to pull a plow, skidding logs, or anything that requires pulling strength. I have read online that it is not a good idea to ride them (like a horse) as they really should not carry more than a hundred pounds or so directly on their back. You can pack them, however, with much more weight than that because the weight is distributed more evenly.

As soon as I can I am going to be able to stay home more, we're definitely thinking about getting some sheep and a donk or two. Remember though, that they are LOUD! So I would at least warn my neighbors. LOL

20yrsinBranson
Hi 20yrsinBranson,

Minidonkeys sound like such old souls, and intelligent and impish, as well. Sheep, well, they are so peaceful looking when they are out grazing in a field, like little clouds on four legs with dark faces.

So donkeys are really good watchdogs...hmmm, already have two mutts, one of whom likes to bark out the window at night if she hears anything. Even though it's hot here in NY, we still have to close all the downstairs windows and doors, or she'll stand there and woof at any perceived danger. She's also the one who got skunked last summer, when I stupidly bought her act that if she didn't get to go out, she was going to have an accident. But the baking soda/hydrogen peroxide paste that we bathed her with, really helped.

I don't think the neighbors out in Mansfield would think too kindly of a mini donkey standing outside at night braying at things. So putting them in a barn stops the commotion? Guess we'll need a barn.
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Old 08-09-2008, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Springtown Tx
8 posts, read 42,749 times
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Default Hi tambre

Quote:
Originally Posted by tambre View Post
Hi,

Does anyone have any experience regarding miniature donkeys. I have seen a few out in Missouri, and I am totally smitten, can't explain it! Are they useful for anything besides looking adorable? Looking to justify why we may need one to my hubby
I'm new to city-data, but I came across your post about mini donkeys.
I have 6 1/2 donks (new baby due in Oct.) One jack, two geldings, and three jennies. I've been raising them for 3 years and here are the main things I have learned about them.

They are cute , lovable, funny, playful, will pickup and move around anything they can lift ( or just shove things around if it is too heavy to lift), love carrots, and come whenever they see me.

Donkey are herd animals. One donkey is a very unhappy donkey. They need another donkey or horse to really be happy.

Miniature donkeys are not big enough to be a guard donkey. They might fend off one coyote or dog but could be maimed or killed if attacked by two or more. We often see coyotes crossing our pasture, but they never approach my herd. When I had only two donks I made sure they were in the barn at night. I have two dogs who were used to running free in the pasture before the donkeys arrived. We even have a doggie door in the gate for them. At first the dogs ran towards the donks and quickly learned that donks didn't want to play with them. So after observing them thru the fence for a couple weeks they reached an understanding. The dogs can Walk around the donkeys, but if they Run the donkeys will chase them

Minis can be pastured with goats and sheep but must be watched. Young donkeys are very playful (donkeys are not considered adult until they are six years old). When they play with other donks, they grab each other by the neck and try to sling each other around. They also grab a leg and try to bring down the other donkey. this is okay for donkeys but could be dangerous for smaller animals like goats.

There are some costs involved. They do need regular hoof trimming, and several yearly vaccinations. And depending on how much acreage you have, you will need hay.

You can find lots of info on miniature donkeys at Love Longears!

I hope I haven't turned you off minis, because I love mine and love nothing more than spending time with them. Before I purchased my first two, I visited several breeders who lived within driving distance. Most of them love to have people come by and see their donkeys and ask questions.

Hope this helped
Donkey Rush

PS If you decide to get donkeys ask breeders about Pet Quality donkeys, they are cheaper than one intended to be shown. Jennies are usually the most expensive from a breeder, jacks and gelding cheaper. There are also many donkey rescue groups around the country.
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Old 08-09-2008, 06:16 PM
 
Location: NW Arkansas
3,981 posts, read 5,264,827 times
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I used to want one of those fuzzy faced burros. I think they are so cute. If our acreage was fenced I would try to get one. I don't know if that is what you are calling mini donkeys. It may be a differant breed.
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Old 08-09-2008, 09:27 PM
 
Location: SW MO
1,238 posts, read 2,916,224 times
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The wild creatures commonly referred to as "burros" out west are feral descendants of domesticated donkeys used as pack animals in the past. They are not really a separate breed, although there ARE some recognized donkey breeds. Most donkey designations are based on size (miniature-under 36", small standard, standard, and mammoth). Mammoths can reach 16 hands and are frequently used to create draft mules, such as the Missouri Mule. Donkeys can be used for riding just like horses. No equine should be asked to carry more than 1/3 its weight on its back. Miniatures, when fully mature, can carry small children for short periods of time, but they can pull a grown person in a cart over level ground. My small standards can pull 2 adults in a 2-wheel cart.


CEDAR CREEK FARM DRIVING DONKEYS
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Old 08-10-2008, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Not on the same page as most
2,499 posts, read 3,731,556 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by firebll31 View Post
The wild creatures commonly referred to as "burros" out west are feral descendants of domesticated donkeys used as pack animals in the past. They are not really a separate breed, although there ARE some recognized donkey breeds. Most donkey designations are based on size (miniature-under 36", small standard, standard, and mammoth). Mammoths can reach 16 hands and are frequently used to create draft mules, such as the Missouri Mule. Donkeys can be used for riding just like horses. No equine should be asked to carry more than 1/3 its weight on its back. Miniatures, when fully mature, can carry small children for short periods of time, but they can pull a grown person in a cart over level ground. My small standards can pull 2 adults in a 2-wheel cart.


CEDAR CREEK FARM DRIVING DONKEYS
Great post Firebll,

Even more smitten than previously.
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Old 08-10-2008, 12:59 PM
 
Location: SW MO
1,238 posts, read 2,916,224 times
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Welcome to the club! Once they capture your heart, you are never quite cured of "donkey fever".
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Old 04-12-2009, 10:49 AM
 
1 posts, read 3,028 times
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Default Mini Donkey

Well Tambre i have a minature donkey he is 3 yrs old. He is adorable and im training him to allow little kids to get on him. I am 13 years old but i have been working with horses since i was 5. I have trained my donkey to allow me to sit on his back now. At first he would buck but his bucks are nothing. Only sit on the mini donkeys back until it stops moving. Once it stops moving imediatly get off and give him a treat. Let that be the end of the training for the day. Then continue the procidure till you are able just to get on his back and walk around. What i realized is that my mini donkey loves to run. We have a very big ring at my barn. He loves ginger snaps so we put a ginger snap in my hand and he chases me all around the ring. He is so gentle and makes sure not to hurt me. If you have anymore question let me know.
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