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Old 07-27-2012, 09:01 AM
Status: "I want summer back." (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: NYC
1,396 posts, read 1,206,059 times
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I haven't gotten up the nerve to ingest it or cook with it yet, but I love it as a body lotion. It leaves my skin so soft and silky feeling without being greasy. I also use it as a scalp conditioner.. just a tiny drop is all it takes. I love the stuff and the way it smells. A friend of mine said she used it for the nail fungus that she kept getting and she said it got rid of it too.

I originally came to this thread to see if anyone had any problems with coconut oils smelling bad. Have any of you had that experience? I bought my organic virgin coconut oil last week and it smelled wonderful.. but now, it smells like it's been used in a fast food restaurant. It's awful. Any recommendations on where I can buy good coconut oil online?

Last edited by Lauriedeee; 07-27-2012 at 09:18 AM..
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Old 07-27-2012, 03:22 PM
 
Location: N26.03 W80.11
324 posts, read 404,577 times
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Nutiva is a good brand of coconut oil. There's no need to work up the nerve to cook with it. It's much more stable to cook with than olive oil. One of my favorite things is to cut up sweet potatoes into thinnish rounds and either saute or bake them in coconut oil. Easy, delicious and nutritious.
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Old 07-27-2012, 04:03 PM
 
1,629 posts, read 927,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2ForTheSea View Post
Nutiva is a good brand of coconut oil. There's no need to work up the nerve to cook with it. It's much more stable to cook with than olive oil. One of my favorite things is to cut up sweet potatoes into thinnish rounds and either saute or bake them in coconut oil. Easy, delicious and nutritious.

I don't want my food tasting like coconuts. How stronge is the flavor when you cook with it?
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Old 07-27-2012, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Wallis and Futuna
11,294 posts, read 17,082,031 times
Reputation: 16619
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lauriedeee View Post
I haven't gotten up the nerve to ingest it or cook with it yet, but I love it as a body lotion. It leaves my skin so soft and silky feeling without being greasy. I also use it as a scalp conditioner.. just a tiny drop is all it takes. I love the stuff and the way it smells. A friend of mine said she used it for the nail fungus that she kept getting and she said it got rid of it too.

I originally came to this thread to see if anyone had any problems with coconut oils smelling bad. Have any of you had that experience? I bought my organic virgin coconut oil last week and it smelled wonderful.. but now, it smells like it's been used in a fast food restaurant. It's awful. Any recommendations on where I can buy good coconut oil online?
There are a couple of different types of coconut oil; the one that smells like coconut is the "virgin" coconut oil, extracted via a variety of processes. That's the type typically used in skin and hair preparations; it is -not- cooking oil. It smells of coconuts.

Then there's refined, bleached, and deodorized coconut oil - that's what you use in cooking. It has no scent and no particular taste of its own.

There's a third type - which is commercial synthetically-scented coconut oil. This is used exclusively in the cosmetics industry, in perfuming for body lotions and similar.

None of these oils are shelf-stable. They will all eventually become rancid if left in the sun, left open, exposed regularly to air, over a period of time.
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Old 07-27-2012, 04:26 PM
 
1,629 posts, read 927,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
There are a couple of different types of coconut oil; the one that smells like coconut is the "virgin" coconut oil, extracted via a variety of processes. That's the type typically used in skin and hair preparations; it is -not- cooking oil. It smells of coconuts.

Then there's refined, bleached, and deodorized coconut oil - that's what you use in cooking. It has no scent and no particular taste of its own.

There's a third type - which is commercial synthetically-scented coconut oil. This is used exclusively in the cosmetics industry, in perfuming for body lotions and similar.

None of these oils are shelf-stable. They will all eventually become rancid if left in the sun, left open, exposed regularly to air, over a period of time.

I know you weren't answering me directly, but you answered my question in your post.

Thanks!
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Old 07-27-2012, 05:49 PM
 
9,212 posts, read 3,403,085 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mochamajesty
I don't want my food tasting like coconuts. How stronge is the flavor when you cook with it?
I have heard it doesnt have ANY FLAVOUR! (I dunno how accurate that is though)
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Old 07-27-2012, 11:08 PM
 
393 posts, read 1,016,146 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
There are a couple of different types of coconut oil; the one that smells like coconut is the "virgin" coconut oil, extracted via a variety of processes. That's the type typically used in skin and hair preparations; it is -not- cooking oil. It smells of coconuts.

Then there's refined, bleached, and deodorized coconut oil - that's what you use in cooking. It has no scent and no particular taste of its own.

There's a third type - which is commercial synthetically-scented coconut oil. This is used exclusively in the cosmetics industry, in perfuming for body lotions and similar.

None of these oils are shelf-stable. They will all eventually become rancid if left in the sun, left open, exposed regularly to air, over a period of time.
Why can't you cook with virgin oil? I've used it to pop popcorn and pan fried a few things with it and it turned out great. It does have a slight aroma of fresh coconuts but if you're making something less savory then it's not so much a problem.
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Old 07-27-2012, 11:21 PM
 
Location: California
25,616 posts, read 17,133,267 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mochamajesty View Post
I don't want my food tasting like coconuts. How stronge is the flavor when you cook with it?
It doesn't make anything taste like coconuts. I was a little worried about that too but just melt a little in a pan and scramble up an egg sometime and see for yourself. I originally tried it because of the so called "miracle" properties but ended up keeping it around because it doesn't brown or discolor my food or take on any odd flavors at all. I use it exclusively for eggs, potatoes, veggies, greasing pans and such.
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Old 07-28-2012, 07:30 AM
 
Location: Wallis and Futuna
11,294 posts, read 17,082,031 times
Reputation: 16619
Quote:
Originally Posted by parasol View Post
Why can't you cook with virgin oil? I've used it to pop popcorn and pan fried a few things with it and it turned out great. It does have a slight aroma of fresh coconuts but if you're making something less savory then it's not so much a problem.
You can. I didn't say you can't. It's just not cooking oil. There -is- a form of coconut oil that is -intended- to be used for cooking. Virgin oil is not that particular form. Refined oil is.

You can use virgin oil for cooking. It just isn't intended to be used for that.

In the food section there's a discussion on lard, and why it's not popular. My contribution to that thread included a use for bacon grease - since bacon grease is generally regarded as waste product and is often thrown away, it -can- be used for cooking. Some manufacturers actually bottle the stuff and sell it, refined and filtered. But I like the unrefined, unfiltered bacon grease, to make popcorn.

So sure, you can certainly use virgin oil for cooking, even though that isn't what it's intended to be used for.
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Old 07-28-2012, 08:35 AM
 
Location: N26.03 W80.11
324 posts, read 404,577 times
Reputation: 300
Quote:
Originally Posted by mochamajesty View Post
I don't want my food tasting like coconuts. How stronge is the flavor when you cook with it?
You can smell it while it's cooking, but it's a subtle scent. There is hardly any taste at all, if any, especially if you're cooking something with bolder flavors. I don't like coconut flavor or texture, but I do enjoy most things cooked in coconut oil.
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