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Old 11-29-2012, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
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Did anyone else notice that? Why are there so many highways for a metro area of only 663,000 people? I mean, you have I-90, I-81, I-481, I-690, NY-481, NY-5, NY-695 and NY-690. Do they really need that many highways there?
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Old 11-29-2012, 10:32 PM
 
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There are a lot of numbers assigned to regular ol' roads... some of them *also* happen to go an awfully long way. I wouldn't embellish so much as to call them highways. In my mind- no exit = no highway. 690 and 481 aren't interstate highways, btw. It's really 690 and 481 for local use and we're fortunate enough to be in the crosshairs of 81 and 90, which also connect them.
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Old 11-29-2012, 10:37 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by proulxfamily View Post
There are a lot of numbers assigned to regular ol' roads... some of them *also* happen to go an awfully long way. I wouldn't embellish so much as to call them highways. In my mind- no exit = no highway. 690 and 481 aren't interstate highways, btw. It's really 690 and 481 for local use and we're fortunate enough to be in the crosshairs of 81 and 90, which also connect them.
All of those routes I listed are highways though. They have exits and limited access and 55 or 65 mph speed limits.
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Old 11-30-2012, 07:02 AM
 
Location: DeWitt, NY
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Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
All of those routes I listed are highways though. They have exits and limited access and 55 or 65 mph speed limits.
Why do you list I-481/NY-481 and I-690/NY-690 as 4 highways, since they're continuations as state routes of the same highways?
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Old 11-30-2012, 07:29 AM
 
56,756 posts, read 81,102,256 times
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Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
All of those routes I listed are highways though. They have exits and limited access and 55 or 65 mph speed limits.
Syracuse's infrastructure is built for a metro with more people, as there was a master plan by the town of Onondaga done in 1967(you can view it on the 2nd floor of the Onondaga Free Library), that had projections for Onondaga County to have around 600,000 people about 20 years or so after that plan. It hasn't happened(yet).

Also, while the population doesn't seem to be that much in its present state, the Syracuse metro area and urbanized area are both 80th. So, it is bigger than 75-80% of all areas in both categories. This does include that the metro lost Cayuga County, a county of about 80-85,000(part of CSA though), that adjacent Cortland County(about 40-45,000) isn't included at all(Ithaca CSA) and the region has 1.2 million people(Inc. Utica-Rome and Ithaca metros). Syracuse's Bureau of Econic Affairs catchment area is 40th in the US. So, it may have have more to do with this information.
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Old 11-30-2012, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
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But isn't Syracuse a decaying city now a days? Also, it's the coldest metro in NY with a population over 500,000. Seems like it rarely gets warm/hot there.
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Old 11-30-2012, 07:41 AM
 
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Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
All of those routes I listed are highways though. They have exits and limited access and 55 or 65 mph speed limits.
No. The Thruway, 690, 481 and 81 all have exits...

The rest don't. Route 5 (also called East Genesee St) is a long road, just like 20 (also called the Cherry Valley Turnpike.) And 91 (also known as Fabius-Pompey Road.) And 173 (Also called the Seneca Turnpike.) And 92. They're just roads of varying lengths and speeds. The state speed limit is 55. That's a standard "I'm driving through countryside now" speed limit. People drive 60-90 mph on them... the non-locals drive about 50. :P
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Old 11-30-2012, 07:43 AM
 
2,440 posts, read 4,981,592 times
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Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
But isn't Syracuse a decaying city now a days? Also, it's the coldest metro in NY with a population over 500,000. Seems like it rarely gets warm/hot there.
Ahh- I see what this is...

Right. It's miserable and cold and moldy and old. Our highways should be closed, to reinforce our worthlessness.

Please, *do* go on...
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Old 11-30-2012, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Capitol Hill - Washington, DC
3,168 posts, read 4,657,299 times
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Originally Posted by proulxfamily View Post
Ahh- I see what this is...

Right. It's miserable and cold and moldy and old. Our highways should be closed, to reinforce our worthlessness.

Please, *do* go on...
You beat me to it. I was wondering what the correlation between weather and number of highways/roads means...
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Old 11-30-2012, 08:04 AM
 
56,756 posts, read 81,102,256 times
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Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
But isn't Syracuse a decaying city now a days? Also, it's the coldest metro in NY with a population over 500,000. Seems like it rarely gets warm/hot there.
I got this...... Actually, Syracuse is the snowiest metro, but if you are familiar with the area, the numbers are skewed by Oswego County, which gets more snow on average than Onondaga and Madison counties. So, snowfall varies within the metro. This is the case for the Buffalo and Rochester areas.

Also, the metro added 12,000 people between 2000-2010, with 9,000 of that occurring in Onondaga County. Population loss within the city of Syracuse was a whopping 1% during that time period. This also doesn't get into the fact that Syracuse hasn't annexed anything since the late 1920's-early 1930's, which is something cities in other regions have been able to do. I'm not going to get into urban renewal, suburbanization and governmental/tax issues. While the area could improve in some aspects, it still has quite a bit to offer.

To others, this poster is looking for a new place to live based on certain criteria, as he has been on the General US forum before.
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