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Old 08-27-2014, 04:40 PM
 
56,338 posts, read 80,579,507 times
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I thought that this is an interesting way to view a city and could give a different perspective: Apple - iPad - Organizing a movement
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Old 08-27-2014, 08:00 PM
 
357 posts, read 835,431 times
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I have a few friends who live in Detroit and love it there. It's too bad it gets such a bad rap. It's similar to Syracuse in that it seems to get those people who love to hate it and they throw their hatred around as much as they can. Then if you actually say anything positive about the area they act like your looking at everything through rose colored glasses. Luckily there is a number of grass roots groups that are trying to change the negativity in Syracuse similar to this ipad thing. I follow a couple of local groups on instagram and FB. What I like is most of the groups focus on the actual city and not suburbs.
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Old 08-27-2014, 11:49 PM
 
56,338 posts, read 80,579,507 times
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Originally Posted by beckyhuggs View Post
I have a few friends who live in Detroit and love it there. It's too bad it gets such a bad rap. It's similar to Syracuse in that it seems to get those people who love to hate it and they throw their hatred around as much as they can. Then if you actually say anything positive about the area they act like your looking at everything through rose colored glasses. Luckily there is a number of grass roots groups that are trying to change the negativity in Syracuse similar to this ipad thing. I follow a couple of local groups on instagram and FB. What I like is most of the groups focus on the actual city and not suburbs.
I know what you mean and sometimes I wonder if people even know what is within the city. For instance, when I mentioned areas like Strathmore and Winkworth on here recently and a poster didn't know if it was within the city or not. That is not unusual to find around here, as I've met people that assume that all of the neighborhoods just past Nottingham High are immediately within the town of DeWitt. So, an idea like that may be a good idea.
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Old 08-28-2014, 09:00 AM
 
865 posts, read 1,556,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beckyhuggs View Post
I have a few friends who live in Detroit and love it there. It's too bad it gets such a bad rap. It's similar to Syracuse in that it seems to get those people who love to hate it and they throw their hatred around as much as they can. Then if you actually say anything positive about the area they act like your looking at everything through rose colored glasses. Luckily there is a number of grass roots groups that are trying to change the negativity in Syracuse similar to this ipad thing. I follow a couple of local groups on instagram and FB. What I like is most of the groups focus on the actual city and not suburbs.
I struggle with that. I know a few people that love Detroit. I don't understand why. However, I love Syracuse.

Syracuse is a mini Detroit, to be honest. Our south side is just as bad as the warzone that is the bad parts of Detroit, just not as big. Our industry moved out, just like Detroit, and left a lot of empty buildings behind.

Political garbage keeps our city, just like Detroit, from coming back even though there is a lot of Potential.

There *is* hope for Syracuse. Whether or not the city will come back ... not sure. I'm more familiar with Utica as I grew up there - Utica is a lost cause. They just took a big blow, as did the Mohawk valley, with Remington laying off more people. But, the good news is, King Andy got his way and 'conservative jobs' are leaving the state.

Syracuse at least made it out of the early 1900s. I don't see that happening in Utica. They have been fixated on a chip plant and placing all of their eggs in one basket. Completely ignoring everything else, actively driving businesses out, while waiting for a chip plant.
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Old 08-28-2014, 09:20 AM
 
56,338 posts, read 80,579,507 times
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Originally Posted by Miller88 View Post
I struggle with that. I know a few people that love Detroit. I don't understand why. However, I love Syracuse.

Syracuse is a mini Detroit, to be honest. Our south side is just as bad as the warzone that is the bad parts of Detroit, just not as big. Our industry moved out, just like Detroit, and left a lot of empty buildings behind.

Political garbage keeps our city, just like Detroit, from coming back even though there is a lot of Potential.

There *is* hope for Syracuse. Whether or not the city will come back ... not sure. I'm more familiar with Utica as I grew up there - Utica is a lost cause. They just took a big blow, as did the Mohawk valley, with Remington laying off more people. But, the good news is, King Andy got his way and 'conservative jobs' are leaving the state.

Syracuse at least made it out of the early 1900s. I don't see that happening in Utica. They have been fixated on a chip plant and placing all of their eggs in one basket. Completely ignoring everything else, actively driving businesses out, while waiting for a chip plant.
I wouldn't go that far in terms of Syracuse's South Side, as there is at least some variation if you include the outer neighborhoods. I've been to Detroit's bad neighborhoods and while the hood is still the hood, Detroit's are at another level(at least at the time).

With Utica, I wonder if its location in terms of interstate access outside of the Thruway and lack of urban investment are issues.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 08-28-2014 at 09:35 AM..
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Old 08-28-2014, 05:49 PM
 
357 posts, read 835,431 times
Reputation: 447
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miller88 View Post
I struggle with that. I know a few people that love Detroit. I don't understand why. However, I love Syracuse.

Syracuse is a mini Detroit, to be honest. Our south side is just as bad as the warzone that is the bad parts of Detroit, just not as big. Our industry moved out, just like Detroit, and left a lot of empty buildings behind.

Political garbage keeps our city, just like Detroit, from coming back even though there is a lot of Potential.

There *is* hope for Syracuse. Whether or not the city will come back ... not sure. I'm more familiar with Utica as I grew up there - Utica is a lost cause. They just took a big blow, as did the Mohawk valley, with Remington laying off more people. But, the good news is, King Andy got his way and 'conservative jobs' are leaving the state.

Syracuse at least made it out of the early 1900s. I don't see that happening in Utica. They have been fixated on a chip plant and placing all of their eggs in one basket. Completely ignoring everything else, actively driving businesses out, while waiting for a chip plant.
But that's just it, there aren't a whole lot of empty buildings in Syracuse anymore. A lot of those old warehouses and stores are being converted into apartments and condos. Some of which are so expensive (half a mil) I wasn't able to afford one when I first moved back here. And believe it or not they are selling and selling so quickly that they continue to convert more and more of the buildings.

I agree that a lot of the problem was that these cities ie Utica and Syracuse were blue collar and based on factory jobs. When those factory's left (similar to Detroit) it devastated the areas and it's taken a long time to slowly change over and diversify the work force. However, change is happening and there are a lot of great things going on in the city.

The negative mindset however, seems to have remained the same. I think a lot of people would be surprised that there is a very large population of upper middle class and upper crust people who live in the city limits in some really nice family friendly neighborhoods. But us city residents seem to constantly be up against a Syracuse suburban attitude that "nothing good is in the city" and then telling strangers things like "don't go to that park because it is a rape park" when there are no facts at all to back that statement up continues the negativity.

I certainly know the problems in the city (I live here) and would be willing to have an honest discussion of them but I find that most people just want to throw around misconceptions and exaggerations rather then facts.

And I think people need to keep in mind that everyone is different. Some people love cookie cutter homes, mini vans and big box stores. When people come on here asking about the suburbs I leave it to the residents of B'ville and Manlius to share their love of those things. I personally can't stand those things, they kind of give me the heebie jeebies But I do love being near Westcott St, having wonderful but diverse neighbors, and being within biking and walking distance of most everything. Oh and believe it or not I fall asleep at night better to the sounds of city life then quiet. When I visit my family in the country it takes me most of the night to fall asleep, way to dark and quiet

Last edited by beckyhuggs; 08-28-2014 at 05:59 PM..
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Old 08-28-2014, 06:39 PM
 
56,338 posts, read 80,579,507 times
Reputation: 12439
Quote:
Originally Posted by beckyhuggs View Post
But that's just it, there aren't a whole lot of empty buildings in Syracuse anymore. A lot of those old warehouses and stores are being converted into apartments and condos. Some of which are so expensive (half a mil) I wasn't able to afford one when I first moved back here. And believe it or not they are selling and selling so quickly that they continue to convert more and more of the buildings.

I agree that a lot of the problem was that these cities ie Utica and Syracuse were blue collar and based on factory jobs. When those factory's left (similar to Detroit) it devastated the areas and it's taken a long time to slowly change over and diversify the work force. However, change is happening and there are a lot of great things going on in the city.

The negative mindset however, seems to have remained the same. I think a lot of people would be surprised that there is a very large population of upper middle class and upper crust people who live in the city limits in some really nice family friendly neighborhoods. But us city residents seem to constantly be up against a Syracuse suburban attitude that "nothing good is in the city" and then telling strangers things like "don't go to that park because it is a rape park" when there are no facts at all to back that statement up continues the negativity.

I certainly know the problems in the city (I live here) and would be willing to have an honest discussion of them but I find that most people just want to throw around misconceptions and exaggerations rather then facts.

And I think people need to keep in mind that everyone is different. Some people love cookie cutter homes, mini vans and big box stores. When people come on here asking about the suburbs I leave it to the residents of B'ville and Manlius to share their love of those things. I personally can't stand those things, they kind of give me the heebie jeebies But I do love being near Westcott St, having wonderful but diverse neighbors, and being within biking and walking distance of most everything. Oh and believe it or not I fall asleep at night better to the sounds of city life then quiet. When I visit my family in the country it takes me most of the night to fall asleep, way to dark and quiet
Thank you for this, as some of this is going on even on this forum non area redidents. I think that some people mistake having a positive outlook/attitude as being a homer or unrealistic, as if any American city is immune to serious issues.

I also agree that not everyone wants the suburbs and to make it seem like there aren't liveable areas of the city is not only unfair, but would be a lie, if a person is considering living within city limits. The problem is that these areas may not be well known and some like what the video shows may be a way to show these areas.
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Old 08-28-2014, 08:18 PM
 
865 posts, read 1,556,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beckyhuggs View Post
But that's just it, there aren't a whole lot of empty buildings in Syracuse anymore. A lot of those old warehouses and stores are being converted into apartments and condos. Some of which are so expensive (half a mil) I wasn't able to afford one when I first moved back here. And believe it or not they are selling and selling so quickly that they continue to convert more and more of the buildings.

I agree that a lot of the problem was that these cities ie Utica and Syracuse were blue collar and based on factory jobs. When those factory's left (similar to Detroit) it devastated the areas and it's taken a long time to slowly change over and diversify the work force. However, change is happening and there are a lot of great things going on in the city.

The negative mindset however, seems to have remained the same. I think a lot of people would be surprised that there is a very large population of upper middle class and upper crust people who live in the city limits in some really nice family friendly neighborhoods. But us city residents seem to constantly be up against a Syracuse suburban attitude that "nothing good is in the city" and then telling strangers things like "don't go to that park because it is a rape park" when there are no facts at all to back that statement up continues the negativity.

I certainly know the problems in the city (I live here) and would be willing to have an honest discussion of them but I find that most people just want to throw around misconceptions and exaggerations rather then facts.

And I think people need to keep in mind that everyone is different. Some people love cookie cutter homes, mini vans and big box stores. When people come on here asking about the suburbs I leave it to the residents of B'ville and Manlius to share their love of those things. I personally can't stand those things, they kind of give me the heebie jeebies But I do love being near Westcott St, having wonderful but diverse neighbors, and being within biking and walking distance of most everything. Oh and believe it or not I fall asleep at night better to the sounds of city life then quiet. When I visit my family in the country it takes me most of the night to fall asleep, way to dark and quiet

I agree that they are being filled here. Whatever is happening here to make things start to turn around is not happening 40 miles east. And that's why I moved here.
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Old 09-04-2014, 10:15 PM
 
14 posts, read 12,062 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beckyhuggs View Post
But that's just it, there aren't a whole lot of empty buildings in Syracuse anymore. A lot of those old warehouses and stores are being converted into apartments and condos. Some of which are so expensive (half a mil) I wasn't able to afford one when I first moved back here. And believe it or not they are selling and selling so quickly that they continue to convert more and more of the buildings.

I agree that a lot of the problem was that these cities ie Utica and Syracuse were blue collar and based on factory jobs. When those factory's left (similar to Detroit) it devastated the areas and it's taken a long time to slowly change over and diversify the work force. However, change is happening and there are a lot of great things going on in the city.

The negative mindset however, seems to have remained the same. I think a lot of people would be surprised that there is a very large population of upper middle class and upper crust people who live in the city limits in some really nice family friendly neighborhoods. But us city residents seem to constantly be up against a Syracuse suburban attitude that "nothing good is in the city" and then telling strangers things like "don't go to that park because it is a rape park" when there are no facts at all to back that statement up continues the negativity.

I certainly know the problems in the city (I live here) and would be willing to have an honest discussion of them but I find that most people just want to throw around misconceptions and exaggerations rather then facts.

And I think people need to keep in mind that everyone is different. Some people love cookie cutter homes, mini vans and big box stores. When people come on here asking about the suburbs I leave it to the residents of B'ville and Manlius to share their love of those things. I personally can't stand those things, they kind of give me the heebie jeebies But I do love being near Westcott St, having wonderful but diverse neighbors, and being within biking and walking distance of most everything. Oh and believe it or not I fall asleep at night better to the sounds of city life then quiet. When I visit my family in the country it takes me most of the night to fall asleep, way to dark and quiet
Your post echoes my thoughts exactly. I moved to Eastwood in 1992 after having lived my first 30 years in North Syracuse and Cicero. I now live on the North Side and while I don't deny that there are issues with some blocks, I have great neighbors, I love the diversity and ability to walk the dog a few short blocks to the inner harbor. There is absolutely no way I'd move back to the burbs.
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Old 09-05-2014, 09:51 AM
 
177 posts, read 205,518 times
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Originally Posted by beckyhuggs View Post
Some people love cookie cutter homes, mini vans and big box stores. When people come on here asking about the suburbs I leave it to the residents of B'ville and Manlius to share their love of those things.
I have to think this is directed in part to me, as the sole Bville poster. In fact, I moved to the village of Bville because I hate cookie cutter homes, mini vans and suburbia in general. I, like you, like to be able to walk to things, which is exactly why I moved to the village. I love that none of the homes on my block look alike, and love the old architecture throughout the village and that I can support local businesses all within walking distance from my house.

The predominant reason I did not move to the city of Syracuse is because of the schools. In most locations in NYS, areas with worse schools have lower taxes. That is just not the case in Syracuse. If I had no kids, I would have been much more likely to move to the city of Syracuse (but may have still moved to one of the villages because I still believe that some of the villages are more charmingly walkable than even the areas of Syracuse we looked at). As I have said on here before, I firmly believe that a child's experience is more dependent on supportive parents than schools, but nonetheless, the Syracuse schools are significantly behind the other districts in the area when it comes to test scores, resources, etc. Yes, there are products of the Syracuse public schools that do well, I get it. But they are the outliers (at least now). I think that the Say Yes program is luring more people into the district but I figured that by the time my kids were of age, there would be some sort of qualifier that wouldn't allow them to utilize the program.

Long and short of it is that I lived in some gritty areas previously, and wasn't scared of grittiness, but when it came down to it, the City of Syracuse didn't appeal to me, even though I came in ready and willing to move to the city (but dear God its not because I like suburbia!!!!) If the schools improve (which I think the Say Yes program is helping with), I think that the (mis?)conception of the city of Syracuse will turn around.
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