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Old 12-09-2021, 01:44 PM
 
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Maybe this will be used for some similar plans offered in this thread for the SW portion of the city, which has a lot of potential for economic development. Good news for Oneida as well.

SYRACUSE, ONEIDA EACH AWARDED $10M IN THE STATE’S DOWNTOWN REVITALIZATION INITIATIVE: https://www.cnybj.com/syracuse-oneid...e-dri-funding/
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Old 12-23-2021, 08:24 AM
 
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Sounds like this could be great news for this corridor in the South Side of the city...

$15.6M proposal would bring retail, restaurants, high-end senior living to Syracuse South Side: https://www.syracuse.com/news/2021/1...outh-side.html

From the article: " A proposed $15.6 million South Avenue revitalization project would bring restaurants, shops and luxury senior apartments to one of the city’s poorest areas.

The Greater Syracuse Land Bank on Tuesday agreed to sell 1.3 acres of property in the 1500 block of South Avenue, between Eastman and Colvin streets on the city’s South Side, for the proposed development.

For $20,000, the Women’s Economic Institute, a nonprofit run by Syracuse native Charlene Tarver, will acquire nine parcels on the west and east sides of South Avenue and a small parcel on the southwest side of the street.

The sale won’t go through unless Tarver is able to raise funding for the construction.

“This is what we hoped for – that somebody will come in, in a neighborhood where there’s a lot of potential, and decide to go acquire some properties and put them together in a development,” said Pat Hogan, a city councilor who is also the chairman of the Land Bank board.

The proposal includes two buildings – a three-story building and a four-story building – that will offer commercial space for restaurants, retail outlets, a community garden and courtyard, and 56 units of affordable, luxury senior housing, according to a proposal submitted to the Land Bank. The storefronts would be earmarked for minority-owned businesses.

Tarver is working with Raymond Nix, a D.C.-area real estate developer who specializes in neighborhood revitalization, to create the project. They’re calling it the “Southside Renaissance Project.”

“As we were looking at the patterns of growth (on the South Side), South Ave. made a lot of sense for us,” Tarver said. “It’s very, very much a desirable location for what we think the future of the South Side will look like.”

The South Avenue corridor is one of the poorest areas in the city, with nearly half of households living below the poverty line and higher rates of unemployment than the rest of the city.

The city released a revitalization plan for the area in 2018, outlining three goals: Attracting neighborhood development, improving the character of the corridor and adding to residents’ overall quality of life.

This project would meet all three goals, said Katelyn Wright, executive director of the Land Bank."

More here(if you can read it): https://www.syracuse.com/news/2021/1...outh-side.html

There is some information earlier in this thread about this corridor and its potential.

A street view of the location slated for the development: https://www.google.com/maps/@43.0216...7i16384!8i8192

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 12-23-2021 at 08:34 AM..
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Old 12-29-2021, 05:54 AM
 
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Syracuse firefighter to restore abandoned South Side apartments where his grandmother lived: https://www.syracuse.com/business/20...her-lived.html

From the article: “ Syracuse firefighter Will Stephens remembers visiting his grandmother at her apartment in the Casey Building on the city’s South Side when he was a young boy.

“I always came down here to play,” said Stephens, who grew up in a single-parent household a few blocks away. “My mother was always working two or three jobs, so this gave me a place to come and play.”

That was the early 1990s. The apartment building closed in the years following his grandmother’s death in 1998. In 2015, the city seized it for back taxes.

But Stephens and his wife, Sarah, plan to bring the long-abandoned apartment building back to life. The Syracuse couple has agreed to buy the building from the Syracuse Land Bank for $10,000 and invest nearly $800,000 to renovate and reopen it.

Built in 1950 at 2520 S. Salina St., the four-story brick building is a rarity in Syracuse, especially on the South Side, one of the poorest areas of the city. All its eight apartments have four bedrooms, which is more than many homes have. That makes them ideal for large or extended families.

“People with bigger families usually have to rent whole houses, many of which are not kept up,” said Stephens.

The couple met in 1997 when Sarah came to Syracuse from the downstate village of Ossining to attend Syracuse University. They married in 2009 and have three children.

Stephens has been a Syracuse firefighter for 14 years and renovates houses on the side. Sarah, 43, is president of SS Funding & Procurement Resources, which helps commercial property owners, developers and business owners obtain and manage public and private funding opportunities.

This will be the fourth and largest property the couple has purchased from the Land Bank, a not-for-profit organization created by the city to return vacant and abandoned properties to productive use -- and back on the tax rolls.

The other three were single-family homes on the South Side and the Outer Comstock area. All were renovated and sold to owner-occupants.

The Land Bank had a deal last year with another couple, Todd and Shanelle Reid, of North Syracuse, to turn the Casey Building into the headquarters for their business, Access Dental Laboratories. That project would have cost $4.1 million, including installation of an elevator.

Shanelle Reid said their lender decided not to go forward with a loan for the project after the coronavirus pandemic slammed the economy. She said she and her husband decided instead to rent space at the Syracuse Community Health Center.

When the Reids’ deal fell through, the Stephens jumped in.

“Will has sadly seen it decay, and he wants to bring it back to life,” Sarah said.“

Also from the article: “ Sarah said their project will cost far less than the one planned by the Reids because they will keep the building’s existing floor plan and will not be installing an elevator. In addition, her husband plans to serve as his own general contractor, doing much of the work himself while subbing out the plumbing and electrical work, she said.

Located on the northwest corner of South Salina Street and Warner Avenue (a block north of the Dunk & Bright Furniture Store), the building’s windows are boarded up and its interior has fallen into serious disrepair. Many walls have holes in them, and paint and plaster are peeling everywhere. When they first toured the building to assess its condition, the Stephens found loads of pigeon droppings on the floors.

However, Stephens said the building is structurally sound. “That’s why we are taking it on,” he said.

The renovations will include new plumbing and electrical systems, new windows and expanded, modern kitchens. Most of the building’s arched doorways will be retained. The work will take a year to 18 months.

The Stephens said they plan to manage the building themselves. Rents have not yet been set, but the couple said their aim is to make them affordable for the neighborhood. (Median household income in the area within one mile of the building is $28,661, according to a LoopNet listing for the property.)

“We’re working on the numbers to try and get the rental rates as low as possible,” Sarah said. “If someone who lives in the neighborhood wants to remain and just move to a nicer apartment, we want them to be able to stay. We’re not trying to drive anybody out.”

A small abandoned house next to the building will be demolished to make room for 16 parking spaces -- two for each apartment. That’s an upgrade from years past, when tenants of the building had to park on the street.“
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Old 03-04-2022, 08:12 AM
 
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Syracuse business owner working to revitalize Southside: https://www.localsyr.com/news/local-...ize-southside/

Also here is some more about potential developments planned for the same side of town, that were mentioned earlier in the thread: https://cnycentral.com/news/local/sy...-a-second-life

https://womenseconomicinstitute.com/...enaissance-pro

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 03-04-2022 at 08:26 AM..
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Old 03-12-2022, 04:47 PM
 
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02S9aLfCnXQ


Bank invests $2M in run-down Syracuse mansion to create neighborhood branch like no other (video): https://www.syracuse.com/business/20...her-video.html

From the article: "Three years ago, community leaders showed Pathfinder Bank executives a parking lot on Syracuse’s West Side, in one of the city’s poorest neighborhoods. They hoped the bank would build a new branch there.

But the executives were more interested in the building already on the property – a century-old mansion that once was the home of a prominent family but in recent years had sat vacant and fallen into disrepair.

Now, the small commercial bank headquartered in Oswego is putting the finishing touches on a $2.2 million transformation of the old mansion into a bank branch like no other.

On the first floor, a former living room at the front of the home has been turned into a bank lobby, but it still looks much like a living room. On one side are two teller stations. On the opposite side of the room is a restored fireplace that once helped to heat the home.

Another room on the first floor will serve as the branch manager’s office. The lower portion of the room’s walls feature restored wooden wainscoting, while the upper half is covered with original fabric wallpaper. The office also has what no other branch manager’s office within Pathfinder’s network has — a fireplace.

The office, which Pathfinder is calling its Southwest Branch, will open this spring at 506 W. Onondaga St. It will be the bank’s fourth office in Onondaga County and 10th branch overall.

In addition to traditional banking services such as mortgages and investment services, the branch will offer programs targeted to neighborhood residents and business owners. They include low-cost checking, and micro personal and business loans.

It also will offer free financial literacy classes to teach people budgeting, basic banking and how to establish credit.

“This location is important because, honestly, there are not very many financial institutions in this area,” said Shynique Gainey, a 17-year banking industry veteran who grew up in the neighborhood and has been named manager of the new branch. “I think this location will do well to bring opportunity to the underserved.”

Gainey said she is eager to help young people from the neighborhood establish their first banking relationships.

“I’ve seen people start with a savings account and in three- or four-years’ time, they come back and say they want to purchase their first home,” said Gainey, who most recently served as supervisor at Empower Federal Credit Union’s downtown branch. “I like to give people that hope.”

A previous article: https://www.syracuse.com/business/20...ch-office.html
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Old 03-12-2022, 05:01 PM
 
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^A street view of the building: https://www.google.com/maps/@43.0397...7i16384!8i8192

BTW, this building down the street closer to Downtown has co-ops within them: https://www.google.com/maps/@43.0410...7i16384!8i8192

A listing in that building: Moderator cut: link removed, competitor site

Last edited by Yac; 03-16-2022 at 12:07 AM..
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Old 03-12-2022, 08:52 PM
 
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Speaking of the thread title, I wonder. Is "gentrification" good or bad?
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Old 03-12-2022, 09:40 PM
 
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Originally Posted by JWRocks View Post
Speaking of the thread title, I wonder. Is "gentrification" good or bad?
Now, it may depend on who you ask. Luckily, so far, much of the revitalization(key word) efforts here appear to involve people from the community and frankly, that is the way to go. I just hope the momentum continues.
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Old 03-13-2022, 02:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Now, it may depend on who you ask. Luckily, so far, much of the revitalization(key word) efforts here appear to involve people from the community and frankly, that is the way to go. I just hope the momentum continues.
That is great news. I love when people are able to pull themselves up by their own bootstraps. What was the trigger that got them to improve their living situations?
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Old 03-13-2022, 05:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JWRocks View Post
That is great news. I love when people are able to pull themselves up by their own bootstraps. What was the trigger that got them to improve their living situations?
Well, there has been help with grants, etc., but some have just acquired property to redevelop due to their connection to the neighborhood. There is also a network of of professionals working together within the community, whether they are natives or not.

To be fair, there are likely many examples across the country, but they just don't get the exposure or do things in a low key manner.
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