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Old 06-24-2014, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Spring Hill Florida
12,135 posts, read 11,601,248 times
Reputation: 5988

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Quote:
Originally Posted by FloridaKash View Post
Pretty sure a lot more people want to live in Florida than Michigan. Sunshine Tax. Also, remember, FL does not have an income tax.
I could only imagine what that job is like in oh, January.
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Old 06-24-2014, 01:17 PM
 
1,640 posts, read 1,699,233 times
Reputation: 2435
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spring Hillian View Post
Is $62k a year enough to qualify as "high paying" white collar work? That is what an experienced corporate paralegal earns in Tampa. Legal secretaries are getting $53k. Insurance Co. Claims Adjuster $65k.
Court Reporter (stenographer) $50k. Customer Service Rep $35k, Hillsborough County Accounting Clerk II, $41k, Hillsborough ENVIRONMENTAL SPECIALIST II, $50k, City of Tampa Solid Waste Supervisor
Salary range: $42,619.20 - $63,835.20 a year.
LOL @ legal secretaries, claims adjusters, stenographers, and customer service reps.

Maybe those jobs are considered "white-collar" in FL because of the general lack of corporate jobs/positions in the professional services sector, but you'd be laughed in most other states if you told someone that a customer service rep. is a "white-collar" professional. I worked as a customer service rep. in a call center in South Florida during college, and people wore pajamas to work, punched a clock, and treated like criminals--definitely not "white-collar" in the least bit!

Makes me wonder if you even know the definition of "white-collar" in addition to some of the professions that fall under that umbrella term. Clearly, you've lived in FL for way too long.

FWIW, "accounting clerk" is to bookkeeper as "executive assistant" is to secretary.
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Old 06-24-2014, 02:32 PM
 
Location: Spring Hill Florida
12,135 posts, read 11,601,248 times
Reputation: 5988
OK, give me your examples. What do you have? Vice President of Operations, Director of Communications, Comptroller and other executive positions. I came up with jobs for the average person where they are not out in the weather, carrying tools, pushing a broom. Not all customer service reps work in call centers. You find them in all phases of face to face business. I guess you have never been in the corporate world or you would know the difference between a secretary and executive assistant. One works for the other. Why dont u take your anti florida game and go sit in a corner.











Quote:
Originally Posted by 8to32characters View Post
LOL @ legal secretaries, claims adjusters, stenographers, and customer service reps.

Maybe those jobs are considered "white-collar" in FL because of the general lack of corporate jobs/positions in the professional services sector, but you'd be laughed in most other states if you told someone that a customer service rep. is a "white-collar" professional. I worked as a customer service rep. in a call center in South Florida during college, and people wore pajamas to work, punched a clock, and treated like criminals--definitely not "white-collar" in the least bit!

Makes me wonder if you even know the definition of "white-collar" in addition to some of the professions that fall under that umbrella term. Clearly, you've lived in FL for way too long.

FWIW, "accounting clerk" is to bookkeeper as "executive assistant" is to secretary.
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Old 06-24-2014, 03:23 PM
 
1,422 posts, read 1,552,989 times
Reputation: 1134
Before this whole thing goes in circles:

The Cities Where A Paycheck Stretches The Furthest | Newgeography.com

This study says that the average Tampa Bay salary is $50,462. When adjusted for CoL, it's $54,969.

But...the source data used to determine CoL is from C2ER, which tries its best to determine a CoL index for metros and metro divisions. But like I said a while back, C2ER doesn't take account if the metro area is extremely car orientated, whether there is good public transportation, sprawl, or the price of a car if needed. But cost of living is hard to determine anyways, so I don't blame them.

With that being said, a high or low CoL can be a good or bad thing. I would prefer taking a CoL increase and enjoy San Francisco than living in Birmingham with its low cost of living. But then again, I would take living in Seattle with its lower cost of living instead of living in the Hartford area with its high cost of living. It really depends what you want.
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Old 06-24-2014, 03:49 PM
 
3,046 posts, read 2,288,978 times
Reputation: 2104
Quote:
Originally Posted by LordHomunculus View Post
Before this whole thing goes in circles:

The Cities Where A Paycheck Stretches The Furthest | Newgeography.com

This study says that the average Tampa Bay salary is $50,462. When adjusted for CoL, it's $54,969.

But...the source data used to determine CoL is from C2ER, which tries its best to determine a CoL index for metros and metro divisions. But like I said a while back, C2ER doesn't take account if the metro area is extremely car orientated, whether there is good public transportation, sprawl, or the price of a car if needed. But cost of living is hard to determine anyways, so I don't blame them.

With that being said, a high or low CoL can be a good or bad thing. I would prefer taking a CoL increase and enjoy San Francisco than living in Birmingham with its low cost of living. But then again, I would take living in Seattle with its lower cost of living instead of living in the Hartford area with its high cost of living. It really depends what you want.

Thanks I just wanted to know why southern states pay less than northern states, this is all I wanted to know. I was brought up seeing many people moving from the south to work at the auto plants. Michigan is full of southern transplants that moved there in the 60's and 70's to work for the big 3 were else could you make a great hourly wage and great medical bennifits. My father had to pay $0 for his first class medical in the 70's and 80's. And Florida was were you went to have a second home in the winter when you retired from the plant. Thus you became a snowbird.
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Old 06-24-2014, 04:09 PM
 
1,747 posts, read 1,299,187 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vannort54 View Post
Thanks I just wanted to know why southern states pay less than northern states, this is all I wanted to know. I was brought up seeing many people moving from the south to work at the auto plants. Michigan is full of southern transplants that moved there in the 60's and 70's to work for the big 3 were else could you make a great hourly wage and great medical bennifits. My father had to pay $0 for his first class medical in the 70's and 80's. And Florida was were you went to have a second home in the winter when you retired from the plant. Thus you became a snowbird.
Salaries and COL go hand in hand. Southern states pay less because COL is lower. Once companies raise salaries, your property or various other taxes will go up, your living expenses etc.. I know someone in a major Northwest city, drives an '88 car but makes a 6 figure salary (??) His mortgage is probably unreal. Another example, a relative in NYC (first job out of college, paying $4K for an apt which is 100+ years old (lower East side, has 2 other roommates.) For $1300+ payment a month you can buy a decent house down here!). There's a lot of huff and puff about salaries up north, but it's not always greener on the other side of the fence.
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Old 06-24-2014, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Spring Hill Florida
12,135 posts, read 11,601,248 times
Reputation: 5988
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vannort54 View Post
Thanks I just wanted to know why southern states pay less than northern states, this is all I wanted to know. I was brought up seeing many people moving from the south to work at the auto plants. Michigan is full of southern transplants that moved there in the 60's and 70's to work for the big 3 were else could you make a great hourly wage and great medical bennifits. My father had to pay $0 for his first class medical in the 70's and 80's. And Florida was were you went to have a second home in the winter when you retired from the plant. Thus you became a snowbird.
I would say because the south never really industrialized. It was a state that originally relied on agriculture. Tourism became a trend in the late 1800s. There really wasnt much of anything going on here until after WWII. Florida’s population grew from 1.9 million residents in 1940 to 2.7 million a decade later. Air conditioning made it possible for people not accustomed to hot weather to stay year round. Retirees became a huge sector of the permanent population as well. It stayed that way for a long time. Of course as more people came more services were offered to support them. Prices were low, wages were low and everybody was happy. Before there was no work and then work became available to more people. There were pockets of higher wages like the Space Coast, Miami (lots going on there in the import/export trade, logistics, etc, Jacksonville with its shipping and port business. In 1977 you could have bought a brand new house for $40k in Brandon. Phosphate mining was big. Things started to change into the 80's and the cost of living went up. More people came in to the state. Wages went up for the people who were filling the new jobs that revolved around technology growth. Some industries began to pay higher salaries but they werent about to change the status quo. The mining industry crashed here. The older occupations like tourism really didnt increase too much. Farms did well, but it was the owners of those farms that made out the best while the laborers also stayed at low wages. In order to keep the economy going, lower wages were a necessity because much of the population would not be able to afford higher priced services. Agriculture changed. Farmers sold their citrus land after freezes and disease no longer made it profitable. Environmental laws changed. DDT which was a very popular insecticide here was outlawed causing more farmers to give up. Land got turned into subdivisions as those from the north desired to be here instead of there. In the 1980s, Florida was growing at the rate of almost 1,000 people a day, roughly the equivalent of adding a new city of Tampa every year. However, we still didnt have industrialization and we werent bringing in much in the way of new businesses so wages stayed low. The state has gone through the times and flexed with the changes. The average annual wage here now is about $40,000. Only 19 states have a lower average wage than Florida. Florida is attracting more new diverse industries now than ever before and that is going to change the economy here further. Higher wages lead to higher prices and costs for services. Florida is a place people want to live. That is why we are at or above 20 million now. There are advantages to living here that are not available anywhere else in the U.S. Floridians have learned
that money isnt everything.
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Old 06-24-2014, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Spring Hill Florida
12,135 posts, read 11,601,248 times
Reputation: 5988
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trigger-f View Post
Salaries and COL go hand in hand. Southern states pay less because COL is lower. Once companies raise salaries, your property or various other taxes will go up, your living expenses etc.. I know someone in a major Northwest city, drives an '88 car but makes a 6 figure salary (??) His mortgage is probably unreal. Another example, a relative in NYC (first job out of college, paying $4K for an apt which is 100+ years old (lower East side, has 2 other roommates.) For $1300+ payment a month you can buy a decent house down here!). There's a lot of huff and puff about salaries up north, but it's not always greener on the other side of the fence.
High salaries is the reason rents for a one bedroom in a pre war building are 1300+ A small older home on Long Island will cost you $400k or more and the taxes are about $1600 a year. Electricity costs are unreal.
I am pretty sure the tolls on the major bridges and tunnels are $7.50. A pack of cigarettes costs $10-12 a pack. A daily newspaper is $1.25. Its the same in other large northern cities. The salaries are high but so are the taxes and the costs of living.

Pick your poison.
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Old 06-24-2014, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Spring Hill Florida
12,135 posts, read 11,601,248 times
Reputation: 5988
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vannort54 View Post
I know that when I graduated from high school I got a job at Chrysler corp. starting pay was over $15 an hr plus full bennifit's that were paid by them. Chrysler is hirieing right know starting out over $14.00 an hour then you work your way up. This is the new starting wage for new hires. My friends son works there just a high school grad been there for a long time making over $25 an hr. under the old contract. These are union jobs my friends son is working 7 days a week now. This is a blue collar job to me.
In 2009 the U.S taxpayer bailed out the Big 3. They were all going under.
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Old 06-24-2014, 06:57 PM
 
3,046 posts, read 2,288,978 times
Reputation: 2104
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spring Hillian View Post
In 2009 the U.S taxpayer bailed out the Big 3. They were all going under.
And so were the big banks, the big 3 are so big you have no idea how many people depend on them. If they were allowed to fold this country would of been in worse shape then it is now. Remember GM is one of the largest employers in the world. I don't here you talking about the wall street bail out. Besides GM and Chrysler paid it back. And I bet you drive an import right. If they went bk every state would feel the effect. Remember you also have suppliers and you also have Canadian workers that would be effected. There are companies down here that make parts for the big 3.
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