U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Florida > Tampa Bay
 [Register]
Tampa Bay Tampa - St. Petersburg - Clearwater
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 02-11-2015, 10:08 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,890 posts, read 36,014,020 times
Reputation: 9464

Advertisements

I've read a couple things. One almost all of Pinellas County could be covered/destroyed with Flood Surge, as much of it very low elevation.

I've also heard that parts of St. Petersburg/Pinellas County was a bit more elevated, and there would be a larger bulk in the middle of the county that would likely be uneffected, while the coasts would pretty much be guaranteed of getting it.

What have you heard in this regard? Thinking St. Petersburg/Pinellas in particular.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-11-2015, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Florida
5,124 posts, read 2,944,882 times
Reputation: 9291
I have seen maps showing elevation, evacuation zones and flood insurance data. I believe they were on a county web site, or possibly a federal govt site. Generally the higher ground is away from the water.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-12-2015, 11:12 AM
 
2,708 posts, read 4,383,797 times
Reputation: 2302
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
I've read a couple things. One almost all of Pinellas County could be covered/destroyed with Flood Surge, as much of it very low elevation.

I've also heard that parts of St. Petersburg/Pinellas County was a bit more elevated, and there would be a larger bulk in the middle of the county that would likely be uneffected, while the coasts would pretty much be guaranteed of getting it.

What have you heard in this regard? Thinking St. Petersburg/Pinellas in particular.
It is not what you hear. It is what it is. In many places there are posted signs telling you how high the flood could rise based on model projections. Not sure how many people actually notice that. There is also Digital Elevation Model (DEM) that show the Tampa Bay area. You pick the risk that you are comfortable with and live with it. I am not going to worry about once in hundred year event besides buying flood insurance .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2015, 07:36 AM
 
15,109 posts, read 30,990,225 times
Reputation: 18180
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pragmaticus View Post
It is not what you hear. It is what it is. In many places there are posted signs telling you how high the flood could rise based on model projections. Not sure how many people actually notice that. There is also Digital Elevation Model (DEM) that show the Tampa Bay area. You pick the risk that you are comfortable with and live with it. I am not going to worry about once in hundred year event besides buying flood insurance .
This ^^^. Bottom line, ANY place in Florida is vulnerable if we have a storm/surge of a high enough caliber.

I'm taking my chances.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2015, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Pinellas County
1,402 posts, read 2,496,139 times
Reputation: 975
One day I shall have waterfront property! Joking aside, did anyone see the bit in news about how the whole of the USA just about will be affected by major droughts in years to come - leaving just a bit of Maine with water - so underwater deserts......
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2015, 03:49 PM
 
1,831 posts, read 2,122,509 times
Reputation: 2602
In the event of a close hit at a high tide at an incoming tide with on shore winds look for a 20 foot rise that would follow all drainage canals, all rivers, all access points (roads). Pinellas would be two possible three islands or high points with most lands under water. All roads and bridges would be closed at the point of winds exceeding 40 mph which would be well ahead of the hit. All stores would be empty of food stuffs well before hit. All water and electricity would be down for 30 to 60 days or more. Sewage treatment would stop and toilets not workable. The many electric pump stations the county has built over the land would be down for 30 to 60 days or more leading to massive additional flooding. Smart people would leave. Last time of hit I think 1923 or so. My Mom told me stories of seeing people hanging in the telephone poles. Dead. Water chest deep in Tampa main roads.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-13-2015, 06:03 PM
 
13,571 posts, read 9,228,472 times
Reputation: 4360
Let me put it a simple way. A CAT5 coming up the pipe from the southwest making landfall just north of Tarpon springs would destroy all of pinellas county just from winds alone gusting up to around 180mph, most of the county would be flooded to boot. A big part of Hills county would be flooded as well, and most everything laid flat due to winds. Now flooding may vary depending on the forward speed of the storm, also how low or high the tides are when the storm makes landfall and the direction of landfall.

When a big storm like a CAT5 comes ashore it pulls up on the water acting like a hugh upside down bowl, a fast forward speed would make it even worse as it would pull the water up ever sharper than a very slow moving storm.

Remember that wind gust to around 180 to 200 mph would lay to waste most homes and buildings. Not many roofs can hold together for long in them kind of winds.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2015, 08:01 AM
 
2,657 posts, read 955,203 times
Reputation: 3130
Living in Miami Beach and pretty much all my life in South Florida, my advice would be if a CAT 4-5 is coming your way, LEAVE, you can't save anything by staying, so just Coe back afterwards and deal with it then.
Even if your area doesn't flood, if the area around it does it will a miserable life for 1-3 months of recovery.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2015, 11:05 AM
 
Location: FL
747 posts, read 1,574,229 times
Reputation: 1517
The problem with leaving is: You don't know exactly when based on the storm track and if you leave too late, then you will be blocked by millions of people on the roads doing the same thing. You will have to move to a shelter closer inland, but you will not escape the state.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2015, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Sinkholeville
1,496 posts, read 1,423,996 times
Reputation: 2322
If I'm stranded by bad weather, I'd rather be at home than parked on I-75 North with the zombies.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Florida > Tampa Bay
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:26 PM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top