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Old 03-06-2008, 01:39 PM
 
5 posts, read 12,118 times
Reputation: 12

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Hello,

I moved down here with little insight as to what the ecomony was like. I moved from Dayton, OH, where the average house was 79,000. Here, it is probably three times that. I was born here, but raised in OH. Considering the cost of lving here, the wages poorly compensate for that. I am a recent (Dec. 2006) college graduate who is working on my MA in Education. I work for a non profit where I make within the high twenties. Everytime I look for a job, I realize that I have made a bad choice living here. Everyone here also complains of the poor wages and high living conditions, but no one can tell me how ANYONE of moderate incomes live.

I have picked up a second job. I have reduced my living expenses. I still cannot make the nessecary ends meet. Not to mention, I have a young child. I do not qualify for any assistance (because my income is not considered low). IMO, Income based living is only worth the lowest they are offering the apartments for and in almost every case, I don't qualify for low income apartmental prgrams; I refuse to pay for a "low income" place at market rates.

So, what is the secret for those who make less than 30? I am serious in asking this question too. Milk is 4 bucks a gallon and gasoline is the same. I feel like I am losing my mind.
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Old 03-06-2008, 05:04 PM
 
46 posts, read 87,365 times
Reputation: 41
Thats a darn good question, iv been thinking this exact thought to my self for the last few years. Im getting ready to to move to Tampa for my new job that pays 43k/year(which is about what i have been making the last couple years. Im a 30 yo single male healthy with no family, very little debt, and I can barley seem to eek buy. I just dont see how some one with family, debt, making less, can make it??? Unfortunately with things the way they are going there are going to be more and more people in you situation and worse. Sad.
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Old 03-06-2008, 05:56 PM
 
849 posts, read 3,124,805 times
Reputation: 198
Default what do you drive

and where do you drive it? did you buy a home? I'm not clear on that from your post. how are you paying for ed? Our income is just about where your's is if we count my husband's financial aid from his MA program. We're a lot older. We keep rent under 800/mo.
We're in a big 1 br but you can find 2's for a bit more, say 900.

Our car note is only 240 and we went for it because the old Volvo was costing that much. We've had some repairs but we have a newer VW now that gets 30mi to the regular gal. The Volvo took high test and gave us 20-22/gal.

We do NOT eat fast food or anything out but we keep KOSHER which is expensive. We like dairy and buy organic milk, fresh fish and lots of veggies and fruits. Almost no carbs. I cook from scratch and my pantry has almost no prepared foods. I use real butter and olive oil. I realize that with a kid, some cookies are necessary but we do enjoy ice cream or brownies once a week and I confess to an addiction to 3 Musketeers Mint.
Because of the complications of keeping kosher, we do not eat meat. But because of allergies and preference, we also eat no beans. We sacrifice nothing we really enjoy.
We do not buy lattes or anything like that.

We do not rent videos, we can find them at the library but prefer books, CD's and making our own entertainment.

I get everything from thrift stores or the dumpster. Absolutely true. I found the greatest vintage wicker chair and table in the dumpster. How much would Target charge for the "shabby chic" equivalent? I don't go into the dumpster, but anything that is outside it or on the curb...
I just found a perfectly good mirror in that pile.
I have great clothes from thrift stores and if I was a smaller size, I could be wearing all designer stuff.

We only have one credit card and it's a secured one. That limits our credit limit. It is not prepaid. It is a true credit card from a major bank. We funded it for what we spend on food and gas. We make those purchases only, on it and pay if off every month. If we had an emergency, like having to rent a car during repairs on the VW (our only car) we could use it and then we'd have some debt but not unmanageable debt for junk. Most car rental places will put a huge charge on a debit card and then you don't have use of that money until they figure out your rental didn't cost that much. It will repair our previous mistakes and it shows us just how much we are spending on those items.

The rebate money from the govt. is NOT going back into the economy, Sorry, George, we need it more than overpriced retailers anyway.

Well, I've written a book here but you get the idea. We're actually putting money aside every month for the first time. $200 at least and we have a charity fund apart from that.






Quote:
Originally Posted by SomoasBelly View Post
Hello,

I moved down here with little insight as to what the ecomony was like. I moved from Dayton, OH, where the average house was 79,000. Here, it is probably three times that. I was born here, but raised in OH. Considering the cost of lving here, the wages poorly compensate for that. I am a recent (Dec. 2006) college graduate who is working on my MA in Education. I work for a non profit where I make within the high twenties. Everytime I look for a job, I realize that I have made a bad choice living here. Everyone here also complains of the poor wages and high living conditions, but no one can tell me how ANYONE of moderate incomes live.

I have picked up a second job. I have reduced my living expenses. I still cannot make the nessecary ends meet. Not to mention, I have a young child. I do not qualify for any assistance (because my income is not considered low). IMO, Income based living is only worth the lowest they are offering the apartments for and in almost every case, I don't qualify for low income apartmental prgrams; I refuse to pay for a "low income" place at market rates.

So, what is the secret for those who make less than 30? I am serious in asking this question too. Milk is 4 bucks a gallon and gasoline is the same. I feel like I am losing my mind.
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Old 03-06-2008, 06:41 PM
 
387 posts, read 1,408,267 times
Reputation: 112
The good ol' fashion American way - marry up.















I mean, jk.
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Old 03-06-2008, 07:12 PM
 
13,773 posts, read 32,689,199 times
Reputation: 10512
I have to agree with jessiesma on many things but she and I are from a different generation, meaning we see things differently now.

Thrift stores are great to buy clothes especially for kids. They outgrow them so fast and you can get name brands in a lot of stores. Food network is another way to save on groceries. Won't help you on the milk, but will on meat and other staples. Check out Sharefl.com for the menu and distribution sites.

Of course, marrying for money is something to consider.. http://bestsmileys.com/money/6.gif (broken link)
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Old 03-06-2008, 07:27 PM
 
Location: So. Dak.
13,495 posts, read 33,187,456 times
Reputation: 15037
Wow Keeper and Jessie, from what I gather you're both a bit older then I am, but not by a lot. I don't frequent thrift stores because in my area, they've gotten to be expensive. But you should see me as I'm digging through the sale racks and the clearance racks at my local Kmart store. The only clothes that I buy are on sale.

We don't buy our vehicles with a loan. We scratch and save and put it in our piggy bank. If we have to drive our car until it's 10 years old, so be it. We wait until the funds are there to buy it. You can't imagine what you can save if you don't have that nasty interest to pay. Over 20 years ago we didn't have the $$ for a car so we had to borrow. The interest on it was either 16 or 19%. Can't remember which. We bought NOTHING except food and paid our bills so we could hurry and pay it off.

Years ago our washer had broken down, but we had an old wringer washer in the basement. It sufficed for over a year until we had the money saved to buy a new washer. My dryer was broken and my clothesline worked fine until we could afford a dryer. My microwave is one of the $39 kind from any store that runs a good special on them.

I realize that things are difficult and they're that way all over. But many of us were brought up by people who went through the Dirty 30s and you'd be surprised what those people taught us on how to survive on basically nothing.

Have you considered using public transportation? Would that be an option for a couple of years? I'm honestly trying to think of ways that would benefit you right now and if anything comes to mind that isn't already posted, I'll repost.
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Old 03-06-2008, 09:37 PM
 
Location: So. Dak.
13,495 posts, read 33,187,456 times
Reputation: 15037
OK, here's a list of suggestions and you can take what works and leave the rest. It's pretty generic and will fit any area.

1. Plan your meals around the sales at your local store.

2. Is it possible for you to trade babysitting with someone instead of having to pay for it?

3. Is public transportation possible for you at all? It sure beats car payments, insurance, gas, and upkeep.

4. For recreation~make a couple of cheese sandwiches and potato salad and go to the beach or sit in a park. You live in a beautiful area and picnics would be great. If you need a good potato salad recipe, DM me.

5.Do you buy your books online or at the college store?

6. Could you possibly trade work for some of your rent? Bear with me. My Uncle was born in 1920 and was educated, which was unusual for a farm boy at that time. He chose to work in heavy equipment for the State because his income was more then if he'd have worked in his chosen field. When he was 80 years old, he and his wife moved into a new apartment complex. He was retired and didn't do this out of financial need, but they needed someone to clean the commons area and vacuum the halls and dust the pictures, etc. They lived nearly rent free for doing a few hours work a week. He gave that up when he hit 85.

7. Larger packages aren't economical for two people. They're often more expensive when you really figure it out and there is a lot of waste. I'd highly consider the link that Keeper posted. It's time we go back to trading work or talent for things we need.

8. On that subject, we needed an electrician years ago and didn't have the $$ to pay for the work. DH is mechanically inclined and fixed the guy's car in trade. You can fit it to whatever works for you.

9. Energy saving light bulbs do cut your electricty bill and they have packages with 3 bulbs at Menards for 10.00.

10. Turn the thermostat up 2 degrees.

11. Cut your cable from premium to basic.

12. Do you have a washer or do you have to stick the $$ into a public one? Back in the 70s there was a washer/spinner and we're in the process of finding out what they were called. (We can't remember.) You hooked a hose up to your water faucet, ran the water into it, and did a few peices of laundry at a time. The second side had a spin cycle. Sounds corny, but it's amazing what it saved us when we had our tiny apartment and needed to run to the laundromat all the time.

13. We all like to contribute and when we didn't have as much to contribute to our little church as we would've liked to give, I took over being superintendent of the Sunday School and also taught one of the classes. DH used our mower and gas and took care of the church lawn. It made us feel better about not having much $$ to put into the collection plate.

14. The principle in 13 works for other things, too. I prefer contributing to animals causes and if we move, we won't have the amount to contribute what we'd like to since we'll be paying 900 a month for Cobra insurance. SO, I plan on donating 2 hours a week to the local pet shelter or Humane Society in the city we will live in.

15. Right at the moment, if you don't need something, don't buy it. The interest rates are much less then they were in the early 80s, but it all adds up.

I truly hope that you can find at least a couple of these things useful. It won't turn you into a millionaire or anything, but every few dollars helps.
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Old 03-07-2008, 06:18 AM
 
849 posts, read 3,124,805 times
Reputation: 198
Unhappy wait a minute

Keeper, don't you have grown kids? I doubt we're that different in age. Not only that, the different generation thing is a false barrier. It's only there if you want it to be. I am well aware of how younger folks think and what they want. Anyway I'm only 61. Youthful thinking runs in the family and I was in college still, just a couple of years ago. I go to a synagogue that attracts crowds from both Tampa Universities because the one in St. Pete is too full of old fogies. The kids keep the mental juices flowing. They're willing to get into issues. The old folks just shut you out if you want to "argue" that is discuss anything meaningful.

Anyway, defend your position.

Where do we see things differently? As far as I can see from your answer, you are merely giving the OP the tools to do what I suggested.
BTW for us, ShareFL doesn't work because of the kosher thing but is a GREAT organization if you don't have to be choosy.

Actually I didn't suggest. I told her what we do to live well on limited funds. If you mean the entertainment bit? Excuse me but my Dad got us a TV in 1949 and I've been plugged in ever since. I just don't watch non-stop and indiscriminately. If we don't watch, it has nothing to do with age. It has to do with our values coming from a different place and that's not a bad thing and I don't mean yours are bad either. Just different but not another generation. I know 20 somethings who don't have TV. In fact, I didn't have one in my 20's either so I misspoke above. I didn't want my daughter to get hooked and you know what? At 30 something she's not letting her kids watch much either. They do lots of activities together and actually talk to each other.

Yeah, I married for love too, drat


Quote:
Originally Posted by Keeper View Post
I have to agree with jessiesma on many things but she and I are from a different generation, meaning we see things differently now.

Thrift stores are great to buy clothes especially for kids. They outgrow them so fast and you can get name brands in a lot of stores. Food network is another way to save on groceries. Won't help you on the milk, but will on meat and other staples. Check out Sharefl.com for the menu and distribution sites.

Of course, marrying for money is something to consider.. http://bestsmileys.com/money/6.gif (broken link)
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Old 03-07-2008, 06:34 AM
 
849 posts, read 3,124,805 times
Reputation: 198
Default Jammie

I think we are about 10 years apart from something you posted or pm'med before. That's nothing when you get into 50's-60's unless some of your friends start drying up mentally. I've seen it happen to 40 somethings. LOL. Thanks for mentioning tho it because Keeper made me sound like the 2,000 year old woman.

Public trans is NOT, I repeat NOT an option for most of us. It just doesn't work in this area. My mind may be 25 but it is in a 61 year old bod. A bod, I may add, that was athletic and in great shape until a few years ago. I just found out that I now have herniated discs throughout my spine. (no, surgery is NOT an option) That is only since the relatively mild auto accident I had last year. Small women do get more injured in even mild accidents than tests indicate cause those tests are run on "average male" sized dummies. Can't say more, litigation is pending
The point is that the bus system is minimal and very many stops don't even have benches or shelters against the rain. That is pretty hard on anyone not in peak condition. Also we have wide streets that drivers take as a license to speed. Here they think "speed limit' is the MINIMUM you can go We had 2 old people run down just a block from my house trying to cross the street I'd have to cross if I took the bus. It can't be done on one light change and people regularly blow thru lights here. That's what happened with a guy in a wheelchair just this past weekend. Guy in a pickup ran the light, swerved to miss a vehicle that had the green and rammed the poor guy in the chair who was crossing legally. Killed instantly. It is truly frightening to try to cross some of these streets. I walk but sometimes I just get "stuck" and can't take another step or if I tried, I'd go down. Obviously an assistive device isn't much help.

I've also found that the thrift shop thing can be regional. I'm just allergic to polyester so mass retailers don't often work. I need to get the good stuff cheaper if I can find it and I also need long skirts, modest tops, no pants for religious reasons. Kaching, kaching.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jammie View Post
Wow Keeper and Jessie, from what I gather you're both a bit older then I am, but not by a lot. I don't frequent thrift stores because in my area, they've gotten to be expensive. But you should see me as I'm digging through the sale racks and the clearance racks at my local Kmart store. The only clothes that I buy are on sale.

We don't buy our vehicles with a loan. We scratch and save and put it in our piggy bank. If we have to drive our car until it's 10 years old, so be it. We wait until the funds are there to buy it. You can't imagine what you can save if you don't have that nasty interest to pay. Over 20 years ago we didn't have the $$ for a car so we had to borrow. The interest on it was either 16 or 19%. Can't remember which. We bought NOTHING except food and paid our bills so we could hurry and pay it off.

Years ago our washer had broken down, but we had an old wringer washer in the basement. It sufficed for over a year until we had the money saved to buy a new washer. My dryer was broken and my clothesline worked fine until we could afford a dryer. My microwave is one of the $39 kind from any store that runs a good special on them.

I realize that things are difficult and they're that way all over. But many of us were brought up by people who went through the Dirty 30s and you'd be surprised what those people taught us on how to survive on basically nothing.

Have you considered using public transportation? Would that be an option for a couple of years? I'm honestly trying to think of ways that would benefit you right now and if anything comes to mind that isn't already posted, I'll repost.
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Old 03-07-2008, 06:48 AM
 
849 posts, read 3,124,805 times
Reputation: 198
Default these are good but

we don't know what Menards is, Jammie. Is there a national comparable?
You're looking for a truly portable washer. They don't exist. You can get a compact one and what I did was build a dolly for it and wheel it to the sink, which is pretty gross when you think about it but there's always clorox I had a coupler attached to the sink faucet that let me attach the washer hoses. The problem is that most of them are digital now so when you plug them into a circuit with your computer, they can pick up the signal and get messed up. That's why I had to get rid of mine. Couldn't modify the service box in an apt. Also most dryers are 22 now and no place to put that. We run about 4 loads a week and that runs us $9. X4 =36/mo. I don't think our electric, with high efficiency units was that much more especially in Tampa where I had a yard I could hang the wash out (Oh no! Keeper will be convinced I AM the 2K year old woman after that) But I can handle $36. It's the fact that I'm sharing with others, ick. But what to do?



Quote:
Originally Posted by Jammie View Post
OK, here's a list of suggestions and you can take what works and leave the rest. It's pretty generic and will fit any area.

1. Plan your meals around the sales at your local store.

2. Is it possible for you to trade babysitting with someone instead of having to pay for it?

3. Is public transportation possible for you at all? It sure beats car payments, insurance, gas, and upkeep.

4. For recreation~make a couple of cheese sandwiches and potato salad and go to the beach or sit in a park. You live in a beautiful area and picnics would be great. If you need a good potato salad recipe, DM me.

5.Do you buy your books online or at the college store?

6. Could you possibly trade work for some of your rent? Bear with me. My Uncle was born in 1920 and was educated, which was unusual for a farm boy at that time. He chose to work in heavy equipment for the State because his income was more then if he'd have worked in his chosen field. When he was 80 years old, he and his wife moved into a new apartment complex. He was retired and didn't do this out of financial need, but they needed someone to clean the commons area and vacuum the halls and dust the pictures, etc. They lived nearly rent free for doing a few hours work a week. He gave that up when he hit 85.

7. Larger packages aren't economical for two people. They're often more expensive when you really figure it out and there is a lot of waste. I'd highly consider the link that Keeper posted. It's time we go back to trading work or talent for things we need.

8. On that subject, we needed an electrician years ago and didn't have the $$ to pay for the work. DH is mechanically inclined and fixed the guy's car in trade. You can fit it to whatever works for you.

9. Energy saving light bulbs do cut your electricty bill and they have packages with 3 bulbs at Menards for 10.00.

10. Turn the thermostat up 2 degrees.

11. Cut your cable from premium to basic.

12. Do you have a washer or do you have to stick the $$ into a public one? Back in the 70s there was a washer/spinner and we're in the process of finding out what they were called. (We can't remember.) You hooked a hose up to your water faucet, ran the water into it, and did a few peices of laundry at a time. The second side had a spin cycle. Sounds corny, but it's amazing what it saved us when we had our tiny apartment and needed to run to the laundromat all the time.

13. We all like to contribute and when we didn't have as much to contribute to our little church as we would've liked to give, I took over being superintendent of the Sunday School and also taught one of the classes. DH used our mower and gas and took care of the church lawn. It made us feel better about not having much $$ to put into the collection plate.

14. The principle in 13 works for other things, too. I prefer contributing to animals causes and if we move, we won't have the amount to contribute what we'd like to since we'll be paying 900 a month for Cobra insurance. SO, I plan on donating 2 hours a week to the local pet shelter or Humane Society in the city we will live in.

15. Right at the moment, if you don't need something, don't buy it. The interest rates are much less then they were in the early 80s, but it all adds up.

I truly hope that you can find at least a couple of these things useful. It won't turn you into a millionaire or anything, but every few dollars helps.
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