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Old 04-14-2009, 07:30 AM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
4,469 posts, read 6,164,358 times
Reputation: 3481

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mquintana View Post
WHOA!

Aconite-that's a lot to take in...but I think I can handle it. I really appreciate your input though. It's good to hear all aspects and opinions...

I really didn't know about possible overflow and not just dealing with mother/babies.

I honestly believe I can handle being a nurse regardless if the doctor is screaming at me or what have you. Maybe the labor and delivery sounds less desirable as the mother/baby, but either way I believe it would be ok with me.

I know some people must look at this profession as though it is glamorous or maybe an ideal job with awesome pay. I, on the other hand do not look at it this way. I realize that the nursing field has been going through a major shortage as it still is and will be in the future-this means I will have to bust my butt more. I also realize that I won't be making boo-goo's money-average starting pay is around $47,000-49-000, right? I guess I don't nessesarily need to work in a hospital, I just figured the pay might be a little better in a hospital rather than a doc office-but I know a doc office the hours are more desirable.

I don't think I will be having nightmare's about that job though, because I have nightmare's of my job now and all I am is an assistant manager for an apartment community (I LOATHE my job). I love to help people and I took care of my great-grandmother before she passed away as well as my terminally ill grandfather who was a diabetic. I can handle the bad.

Aconite-please do elaborate for me-how is it to work in a private practice? What do they average?
Also, as I mentioned I considered taking my education further and maybe being a nurse practitioner or anestetic nurse. What does the nurse practitioner average?

Well, first let's make sure we're on the same page. When I say "in private practice" I don't mean as an office nurse (those are frequently LPNs, by the way, not RNs). Doctors' office nurses generally get paid far less than their counterparts in hospitals, though yes, the hours and days are generally better.
When I said "in private practice", that was with advanced degrees, seeing clients for groups and individual sessions. My paycheck at the time probably isn't germane since I've been out of practice for awhile. But yes, it was more than I made as a hospital nurse or nursing supervisor, and you can probably get a general idea of what ARNPs or CRNAs make by googling.

As for the nightmares comment...you can have those with any job. If (as an example) cranky people or demanding people bother you now, they aren't likely to bother you less just because they're also throwing up on your shoes. If you hate paperwork...well...there's a ton of it in healthcare. "Not charted/not done" is the mantra. You may find things about the job that counterbalance writing about being thrown up on or bled upon by cranky people, though.

Last edited by Aconite; 04-14-2009 at 07:55 AM..
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Old 04-14-2009, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
4,469 posts, read 6,164,358 times
Reputation: 3481
Quote:
Originally Posted by mquintana View Post
This is a major downfall and maybe it would burn me out because I may have to work twice as harder. I know I won't mind because I would rather be too busy than bored. I am pretty good with work over loads and pressure.
Staffing issues (I remember back in the days of Humana they had 16:1 ratios, which were INSANE) can burn you out fast. Not because you have to work harder, because many nurses are adrenaline junkies who like hard work. What fries you is knowing you could have done more, and done it better, and gone that extra mile-- and you simply didn't have time. (Even though you left an hour after your shift was over because you didn't have time to chart.) A lot of times it's not the crappy nurses who burn out, it's the good ones. The truly crappy don't care, and with a shortage, they'll always have jobs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mquintana View Post
I don't know how I would go about getting tuition assistance before I enter nursing school. Could you please fill me in on how that works?
The state nursing association has conventions every year. You could attend as a student fairly cheaply, and the vendor room is a great place to see nurse recruiters all lined up in one spot. Failing that, call the hospital HR offices, and ask to speak to their recruiter.

I also recommend getting a job actually working in a hospital before signing on for school. A year or so as a unit secretary or an aide will give you a fairly realistic view of what you're looking at, and it'll be a huge advantage once you're in school as far as time management, basic skills, and general comfort level. And pretty much most hospitals have tuition reimbursement programs for part- and fulltime employees, or at least they did last time I looked.

Last edited by Aconite; 04-14-2009 at 07:57 AM..
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Old 04-14-2009, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Riverview, FL....for now.
1,404 posts, read 5,038,042 times
Reputation: 470
I really appreciate all the input you have given me. It's definatly been a huge help!

Here's the thing about getting a job at a hospital before I go into nursing school-I would need to make about what I do now to keep my head afloat. I have 2 kids and I need to make sure I can pay my bills too.
What does a unit secretary or aid's job consist of? Do you know the base pay or atleast an average?

I didn't know about the conventions, that is really good to know. You have been very informative and I appreciate everything!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aconite View Post
Staffing issues (I remember back in the days of Humana they had 16:1 ratios, which were INSANE) can burn you out fast. Not because you have to work harder, because many nurses are adrenaline junkies who like hard work. What fries you is knowing you could have done more, and done it better, and gone that extra mile-- and you simply didn't have time. (Even though you left an hour after your shift was over because you didn't have time to chart.) A lot of times it's not the crappy nurses who burn out, it's the good ones. The truly crappy don't care, and with a shortage, they'll always have jobs.



The state nursing association has conventions every year. You could attend as a student fairly cheaply, and the vendor room is a great place to see nurse recruiters all lined up in one spot. Failing that, call the hospital HR offices, and ask to speak to their recruiter.

I also recommend getting a job actually working in a hospital before signing on for school. A year or so as a unit secretary or an aide will give you a fairly realistic view of what you're looking at, and it'll be a huge advantage once you're in school as far as time management, basic skills, and general comfort level. And pretty much most hospitals have tuition reimbursement programs for part- and fulltime employees, or at least they did last time I looked.
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Old 04-14-2009, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
4,469 posts, read 6,164,358 times
Reputation: 3481
I'm sorry, I'm really not current with pay scales. Unless someone else knows, Google is probably your best bet.



Quote:
Originally Posted by mquintana View Post
You have been very informative and I appreciate everything!
You're quite welcome. Good luck to you!
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Old 04-14-2009, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
27,798 posts, read 24,886,306 times
Reputation: 14611
Outstanding advice. Being a ward clerk/unit secretary is the best way to tell if nursing is the job for you. In nursing school a lot of my classmates did this part time and not only did better in school (because of their experience), they knew what they were getting into.

I note lately with the news of the higher unemployment rates, a lot of people are talking about becoming nurses. I just hope they all know what they're getting into - for the patient's sake, for their sake, and the nursing profession's sake. I'd like to think they're getting into the profession to help others - not just for a secure pay check/secure profession where finding employment may be easier.

Our profession needs hard working, caring, ethical individuals.

I have to say, Advance Practice RNs have my ultimate respect - Aconite knows the profession as well as anyone. Very good advice.
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Old 04-14-2009, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Riverview, FL....for now.
1,404 posts, read 5,038,042 times
Reputation: 470
On my end, I chose to change my major because this is something I always wanted to do my whole life. I do understand what the job is really about and do not consider it a good, quick pay. I think being an attorney (as I originally decided to major in) starts out making more than a nurse does-or may.

I want to go into nursing because I want to help people. I like helping others so it'll be a sense of fulfillment trying to comfort people, helping them, caring for them, ect.

You are right though, I think a lot of people may choose to go into nursing because they believe the pay is awesome and may not even think of the people they will be caring for. This is wrong. I hope this doesn't happen too much because I know (from previous experiences) that there are some bad nurses who care nothing about the job or people-and this is wrong. There is a reason why people are in the hospital...

I will look into the clerk/secretary. If the pay matches I will majorly consider making a change of employment (ofcourse after I can move because I will loose my rental discount if I leave my company-and $1410 for an apartment is RIDICULOUS! lol).

Quote:
Originally Posted by BucFan View Post
Outstanding advice. Being a ward clerk/unit secretary is the best way to tell if nursing is the job for you. In nursing school a lot of my classmates did this part time and not only did better in school (because of their experience), they knew what they were getting into.

I note lately with the news of the higher unemployment rates, a lot of people are talking about becoming nurses. I just hope they all know what they're getting into - for the patient's sake, for their sake, and the nursing profession's sake. I'd like to think they're getting into the profession to help others - not just for a secure pay check/secure profession where finding employment may be easier.

Our profession needs hard working, caring, ethical individuals.

I have to say, Advance Practice RNs have my ultimate respect - Aconite knows the profession as well as anyone. Very good advice.
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Old 05-10-2009, 11:36 AM
 
95 posts, read 346,243 times
Reputation: 113
Out of the nursing threads I have read on here, I hadn't come across this one yet! It has been enjoyable to read.

I recently graduated from nursing school on May 2nd! I have applied to several jobs and either have been in touch with the recruiters or am waiting to hear back.

I would say that working in a hospital (as a CNA, PCT, unit secretary, etc.) is a great idea before starting nursing school, or even during nursing school if you can handle it. Like PPs have stated, it gives you an insider's view of what it is like to be in the hospital and what nurses do. RNs can do everything that techs do (but not the other way around), it's just that sometimes they need to delegate those tasks to the techs for time management and priority purposes. Throughout my clinical experiences in nursing school, I have seen what techs do and am very, very thankful for them.

In addition to getting experience, already being a hospital employee also may help with getting a job once you graduate nursing school. I'm not saying that working in a hospital during nursing school automatically guarantees you an RN position, but it may help. For example, some of the hospitals in the area have a priority to place internal applicants for RN positions first before they consider external applicants.

I personally did not work as a tech because my program was so demanding and my grades (and life) would have suffered a lot. Some people do work during nursing school because they have to, and there are people who can balance it fine with school. A friend of mine worked as a CNA prior to starting nursing school, and she worked during the semester breaks.

I also recommend the Morton Plant Mease hospital system if you are interested in women's health.

Lastly - MPM, the VA, and TGH are magnet facilities, which is the highest level of recognition a hospital can receive.
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Old 05-10-2009, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
27,798 posts, read 24,886,306 times
Reputation: 14611
Good luck with your future career. Nineteen years here - a lot of different nursing jobs for the military - and I'm burned out. Hope you find your niche and have a job where you enjoy getting up and going to work.
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Old 05-10-2009, 12:34 PM
 
95 posts, read 346,243 times
Reputation: 113
Thank you, BucFan! I sure hope so, too.
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Old 05-11-2009, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
4,469 posts, read 6,164,358 times
Reputation: 3481
Quote:
Originally Posted by BucFan View Post
Good luck with your future career. Nineteen years here - a lot of different nursing jobs for the military - and I'm burned out. Hope you find your niche and have a job where you enjoy getting up and going to work.

Ooh, military nurse! I'd salute you, but my daughter (USAF) tells me I don't do it right. Instead, I'll just extend my appreciation and kudos.
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