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Old 01-06-2011, 10:54 PM
 
18 posts, read 44,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rb62 View Post
I was wondering if these cold snaps we have in the weather would kill off any of these non-indigenous snakes, or other species like monotor lizards?
I don't think the Cold snaps last long enough to kill off anything more than a year old. If memory serves right Reptiles need a lot of heat to help digest, but in our colder weather days I think they just "Hibernate" (probably more like Nap) for a few days.
Now if we got a full on blizzard that lasted for a few weeks at under freezing, yeah I'd say that would probably kill them all off... along with most ecosystem too!
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Old 01-06-2011, 11:40 PM
 
Location: Owasso, OK
1,224 posts, read 3,500,209 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dirtleg View Post
I have a couple pics here of a snake. I couldn't identify it so I didn't catch it. Wondering if it's an escaped/released python of some sort. Sorry for the poor pics..bumpy boat and camera phone. Need to know because there are a number of pets around and I don't want them on the dinner list.
Looks like a Python to me. Watch "Invasion of Giant Pythons" on PBS online video. They talk about the epidemic of pet pythons being released into Florida wilderness. It's causing a huge problem.
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Old 01-18-2011, 07:52 PM
 
461 posts, read 362,177 times
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This snake is the native Brown Water Snake (Nerodia taxpilota)


As it ages the spots fade to a dull brown, it is brighter after a fresh shed of skin.
A non-venomous snake sometimes confused with the Water Moccasin/cottonmouth. It is a rather nasty snake and will bite though if cornered or provoked, however most of the time it will move quickly to get out of your way. Best to let it move on to as it will stink you with a ghastly musk along with a painful bite if you mess with it. Actually this snake can be more aggresive then the cottonmouth which it mimics to a point.
When a cottonmouth is pissed off it will often open its mouth and let you know it intends to bite and thus you will see the cottony inside of a water moccasin, but it doesn't have to do this before it bites.
This snake doesn't do that when upset,... it strikes and lets out its stink juice..............
Common around freshwater bodies of water both large and small. The venomous cottonmouth has a much more triangular head and a white or creme stripe running from the eye back down the head, as well as pupils which are cat like. non-venomous water snakes have round pupils. When a cottonmouth swims, or any pit viper its body floats along the surface of the water exposing it much like one would see a photo of the loch ness monster however a non-venomous snake head is all that sticks out of the water when it swims.
All water snakes are confused with the water moccasin, but this fella is pretty difficult with age to tell apart for the laymen sometimes as both are heavy stout dull looking snakes with large heads.
All in all a harmless water snake that eats frogs, fish, mice, birds, big bugs whatever, and its not a constrictor, nor related to the python other than being a snake.


...its amazing how many people are posting that its a invasive python without any real knowledge or a very good photo of a rather difficult native , natural, 100% more Floridian than most of the posters. This good `ole denizen of marshlands the south over is constantly getting knocked off as mistaken for its native venomous relative, the cottonmouth but now that the Sierra club misfits are saying its python it will likely be wiped off the face of the earth within a year or two. Used to see these things all the time, while I ain't in love with this swamp sucker hes a fine snake all the same, seeing less and less of them now-a-days. I wonder why?

Last edited by mph101; 01-18-2011 at 08:04 PM..
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Old 01-18-2011, 09:30 PM
 
817 posts, read 1,919,460 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ga Jerk View Post
Pythons need to be removed from the Florida ecosystem. Kill that snake next time you see it.
This. Kill that thing next time you see it. It doesn't belong here. Wish I could ship its former out as well.

Edited to add that the brown water snake is possible.
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Old 01-19-2011, 09:17 PM
 
774 posts, read 1,691,567 times
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I hope you didn't kill that snake! It is a brown water snake, native to the area and harmless.
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Old 01-25-2011, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Valrico, FL-From Nebraska
20 posts, read 55,161 times
Reputation: 31
Wow just checked back here...no I didn't kill the snake. I haven't seen it since last year, perhaps it moved on or got shy. I still would have liked to have caught it just to take some better pictures to help educate people as I have been. Thanks for all the help guys..being a non native floridian and non herpetologist I wasn't sure.
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Old 03-27-2011, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Yellow cottage, green doors.
16,392 posts, read 13,055,748 times
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It is a Brown Water snake; Nerodia taxispilota.
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Old 03-27-2011, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Holiday, FL
1,577 posts, read 1,729,463 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Residenthere View Post
I don't think the Cold snaps last long enough to kill off anything more than a year old. If memory serves right Reptiles need a lot of heat to help digest, but in our colder weather days I think they just "Hibernate" (probably more like Nap) for a few days.
Now if we got a full on blizzard that lasted for a few weeks at under freezing, yeah I'd say that would probably kill them all off... along with most ecosystem too!
Considering that over the next decade, pythons are expected to spread up to the TN/KY line, I'm afraid a few days of freezing weather won't do it either. It isn't as much a matter of snakes being 'winter hardy" as it is a matter of the shelter they can find to wait out the cold. The farther north, the further down the frost line goes into the ground. In Florida, there is not frozen ground, but near the Canadian line, the ground may be frozen as much as 6 to 10 feet deep, depending on the amount of snow cover. If the snake can't get below the frost line, it will freeze. If it can, it will survive. It would take a weather system like "DAY AFTER TOMORROW" to kill any of them off.
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