U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Florida > Tampa Bay
 [Register]
Tampa Bay Tampa - St. Petersburg - Clearwater
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-21-2010, 04:48 AM
 
165 posts, read 468,035 times
Reputation: 80

Advertisements

.....and showing no sign of recovery...that's what scares me it seems like the powers that be are somewhat out of touch/ allergic to proactiveness and I don't see anything that shows a real effor to dig us out of the proverbial sand.

I have never really thought about leaving Fl. but the situaiton hear does strike some fear for me.

Other's thoughts?

Link: http://www.forbes.com/2010/04/09/cit..._slide_10.html
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-21-2010, 08:34 AM
 
1,500 posts, read 2,783,580 times
Reputation: 1227
This is a very good argument for not living in the moment.

Florida has a habit of changing on a dime. Plus when things are bad everywhere, Florida is exemplified as all that can go wrong. But when things are good in the world, they are extolling its virtues.

As I posted in the thread Economist's Optimistic Outlook for Tampa:

Per Tampa's economy should recover faster than much of the state, UCF predicts - St. Petersburg Times

"Tampa Bay's battered economy has ended its free fall and is slowly getting better, with wages expected to grow near the fastest pace in the state over the next three years..."

And I just found this:

http://www.tampabay.com/news/time-fo...-media/1037427

...the state is making strides in encouraging new "clusters" of industry more sophisticated (and better paying) than tourism and other business so dependent on population influx. He specifically pointed to the biotech boomlet that's attracted to Florida such high-end research firms as Scripps and, locally, SRI International, and the rising investments made by Tampa's H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute.

...Gov. Charlie Crist and our Legislature, took its eyes off this fledgling biotech cluster. It's too early to assume it can blossom in what is probably the most competitive industry on the planet.
We're not very good at sticking to one thing and seeing it through. Florida: The Attention Deficit Disorder State.

..."Anyone really believe we're done?" asks Carvajal. Florida's old economic model of "cheap land and labor" no longer works in a state now dealing with a higher cost of living, he says. Instead, Florida must rely on its ability to innovate and compete in new markets and industries.

"Fortunately, we have strong footholds in some of these markets and are making inroads in more each day," Carvajal says. "We're well positioned, both literally and figuratively, to be a world leader."

So maybe all hope is not yet lost in paradise.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2010, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Myrtle Beach
3,378 posts, read 7,867,707 times
Reputation: 2926
I read the same article and it made me pause. I began thinking, crap....should we continue are move to Tampa? Well, the fact of the matter is I am pretty much past the point of no return at this point, so yeah....we're moving to Tampa.

I believe Florida is going to bottom out soon, once it does it will begin to increase. As HousingCrashSurvivor said, when it's bad Florida gets the brunt of it. When it's good, Florida does great. Call me an optimist, perhaps an idiot. I like to think by 2013 the Tampa area will be doing much better and may even begin to be recognized as one of the best recovering cities in the country. I think Florida will begin to rebound and once again experience growth and it's tourist industry will begin to boom. Remember, there are a lot of people out there who have no been able to take a vacation for many years. Once this economic disaster ends and consumers feel confident I think you will see a great number of people decide they need a vacation and will head to Florida since it is in the country.

As these tourists come, Florida's economy will recover. Once the economy recovers there will be positive articles published regarding Florida's 'New' Financial Health. Many of the tourists that had visited, will read these articles and still be able to find homes at low prices. These individuals will end up relocating in Florida and contribute to the economy. Once the excess housing gets full Florida will begin to boom once again. I think a boom will begin to happen in 2015 or so. I think now is the time to get into position to ride the wave that is coming.

With all of that said. Florida's leaders need to begin positioning the state to become a Company friendly state and begin doing what they can to get some more headquarters (national or regional) into this state. Quite honestly, if it takes large tax breaks for these companies to move here, they should do it. This state needs jobs and these corporations could provide them. Personally, I think they should start courting bio-tech companies.

Again, like I said. I may be an optimist or just an idiot. What I do know is that the economy where I am now will be hurting terribly bad in 5 to 10 years, regardless if the rest of the country is doing well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2010, 10:10 AM
 
15,112 posts, read 31,000,924 times
Reputation: 18209
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spongedaddy View Post
.....and showing no sign of recovery...that's what scares me it seems like the powers that be are somewhat out of touch/ allergic to proactiveness and I don't see anything that shows a real effor to dig us out of the proverbial sand.

I have never really thought about leaving Fl. but the situaiton hear does strike some fear for me.

Other's thoughts?

Link: List: 10 U.S. Cities In Free Fall - 2. MSA: Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL - Forbes.com
My thoughts? I look at those "lists" from Forbes and I just roll my eyes... for some reason we are on their "hate" list lately, having shown up on several negative type lists. And all those other metro areas on their list in "free-fall" - give me a break - Los Angeles? I don't think Forbes really has a clue...

There is PLENTY going on - all over this state - there have been numerous articles about big things happening right here in my area of Sarasota-Manatee - new startups that will be hiring, new industries coming. And some bigger news is the expansion of Port Manatee, which last year signed a strategic alliance with the Panama Canal which is expanding. Port Manatee is the closest port to the Panama Canal, and has thousands of acres for expansion, this will be a huge boon to the area. I am only touching on a couple of highlights, I really don't understand why so many ( on this forum and at Forbes) seem so out of touch with things going on here - there is a ton happening - read some newspapers, watch the news! lol

All those who think Tampa (or Florida) is in danger of any long-term economic free-fall are going to be surprised over the next few years at the amazing transformation that is going to take place in this state.

Just check out this Youtube video for USF's new Polytechnic University in Lakeland which has just broken ground - this will be what it will look like when finished - designed by award-winning architect Santiago Calatrava, it is absolutely amazing, and like something out of the future! This is smack in the middle of our high-tech corridor:


YouTube - USF Polytechnic New Campus Master Plan
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2010, 10:14 AM
 
165 posts, read 468,035 times
Reputation: 80
That's an interesting more positive look at the situation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2010, 06:43 PM
 
254 posts, read 520,231 times
Reputation: 82
Times are definetely rough right now. However, you have to also step back a bit and look at the longer history of Florida and Tampa. Boom and bust cycles are nothing new here. The great Florida land boom of the 1920's ended with a crash in 1926, three years before the Great Depression gripped the nation. It was a speculative bubble that burst. That's why you will not find bungalows dated from 1927/1928 onward until the 1940's. Go ahead and check. They are all dated from mainly the late teens to 1926/1927. The real estate crash coupled with the Depression kept things really down until after WWII. Eventually, economics turn around. They will again. Florida still is a strong magnet for Northeasterners and Midwesterners. There are still huge popluations in the North who would relocate here if they could, boosting growth again.

The only question is how long will it take for a recovery. Each period of history has its ownb unique set of circumstances to deal with.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2010, 06:48 AM
 
85 posts, read 197,068 times
Reputation: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnland View Post

The only question is how long will it take for a recovery. Each period of history has its ownb unique set of circumstances to deal with.
If this helps any, we spent 9 days searching for a house in the area. Time after time when we tried to go back to look at a house or we'd put a house on our list to see we'd find out they were under contract much of the time. I was really stunned at all the houses on realtor.com that were sold or under contract and it sure cut our list down by about 3/4, and our list was a few pages long. If I only judge by that, it seems you're in an upturn but I'm guessing there are other factors.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2010, 08:40 AM
 
Location: SARASOTA, FLORIDA
11,501 posts, read 13,391,089 times
Reputation: 4876
Quote:
Originally Posted by gypsychic View Post
My thoughts? I look at those "lists" from Forbes and I just roll my eyes... for some reason we are on their "hate" list lately, having shown up on several negative type lists. And all those other metro areas on their list in "free-fall" - give me a break - Los Angeles? I don't think Forbes really has a clue...

There is PLENTY going on - all over this state - there have been numerous articles about big things happening right here in my area of Sarasota-Manatee - new startups that will be hiring, new industries coming. And some bigger news is the expansion of Port Manatee, which last year signed a strategic alliance with the Panama Canal which is expanding. Port Manatee is the closest port to the Panama Canal, and has thousands of acres for expansion, this will be a huge boon to the area. I am only touching on a couple of highlights, I really don't understand why so many ( on this forum and at Forbes) seem so out of touch with things going on here - there is a ton happening - read some newspapers, watch the news! lol

All those who think Tampa (or Florida) is in danger of any long-term economic free-fall are going to be surprised over the next few years at the amazing transformation that is going to take place in this state.

Just check out this Youtube video for USF's new Polytechnic University in Lakeland which has just broken ground - this will be what it will look like when finished - designed by award-winning architect Santiago Calatrava, it is absolutely amazing, and like something out of the future! This is smack in the middle of our high-tech corridor:


YouTube - USF Polytechnic New Campus Master Plan

I read an article a while back that said Florida could become the new high-tech hub of the US as long as the leaders of the state do not over tax businesses and do not become anti business growth.

This along with the rebound of the tourism and the growth in other areas as you mentioned above could put Florida at the top of states who will rebound from this anti-business, high tax, horrific economy we are currently in.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2010, 08:51 AM
 
5,453 posts, read 7,754,034 times
Reputation: 2141
didn't we already beat this article to death?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2010, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Lincoln County Road or Armageddon
4,224 posts, read 5,675,577 times
Reputation: 5775
Quote:
Originally Posted by housingcrashsurvivor View Post
This is a very good argument for not living in the moment.

Florida has a habit of changing on a dime. Plus when things are bad everywhere, Florida is exemplified as all that can go wrong. But when things are good in the world, they are extolling its virtues.

As I posted in the thread Economist's Optimistic Outlook for Tampa:

Per Tampa's economy should recover faster than much of the state, UCF predicts - St. Petersburg Times

"Tampa Bay's battered economy has ended its free fall and is slowly getting better, with wages expected to grow near the fastest pace in the state over the next three years..."

And I just found this:

Time for Florida to stand up to bashing by media - St. Petersburg Times

...the state is making strides in encouraging new "clusters" of industry more sophisticated (and better paying) than tourism and other business so dependent on population influx. He specifically pointed to the biotech boomlet that's attracted to Florida such high-end research firms as Scripps and, locally, SRI International, and the rising investments made by Tampa's H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute.

...Gov. Charlie Crist and our Legislature, took its eyes off this fledgling biotech cluster. It's too early to assume it can blossom in what is probably the most competitive industry on the planet.
We're not very good at sticking to one thing and seeing it through. Florida: The Attention Deficit Disorder State.

..."Anyone really believe we're done?" asks Carvajal. Florida's old economic model of "cheap land and labor" no longer works in a state now dealing with a higher cost of living, he says. Instead, Florida must rely on its ability to innovate and compete in new markets and industries.

"Fortunately, we have strong footholds in some of these markets and are making inroads in more each day," Carvajal says. "We're well positioned, both literally and figuratively, to be a world leader."

So maybe all hope is not yet lost in paradise.
As long as Florida businesses continues to pay below market wages, it will be a below market state. I've heard this same argument about "moving forward, no longer a low age state, blah blah" over and over for years and we still produce mostly low wage, service jobs. It's fine and dandy to declare that Florida is "no longer a low wage state", but business interests call the shots in Tallahassee, and business likes cheap labor. Always have and always will. But Carvajal (who is ironically some Chamber of Commerce honcho) is right about one thing-cheap labor doesn't work any more. Things will get better as the recession winds down and Florida will plod along pretty much as it always has, relying on population growth, urban sprawl and low wage jobs, and when the next economic crisis arises, we'll again hear the same declarations about "we're no longer a low wage state, we have to move forward, etc". After more than 40 years in Florida, I've learned our state "leaders" (I use that term very loosely) are quite comfortable with the status quo and the privileges it brings them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Florida > Tampa Bay
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top