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Old 01-23-2011, 01:39 PM
 
17 posts, read 28,476 times
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Is there anyone that has had success with this? How did the process work? Did you just look at the County website? Did you mail to the districts of choice? Any info on this I would appreciate.
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Old 01-23-2011, 02:39 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
249 posts, read 459,567 times
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I know someone that applied to a district in Alaska from out of state. They did all the paperwork electronically and interviewed over the phone first, then met up at a job fair where they were offered the position.
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Old 01-23-2011, 03:23 PM
Status: "FEAR won in 2014." (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Mid-Town
7,616 posts, read 10,281,883 times
Reputation: 5229
Look at several sites...

Some states have a search like this

Look for Jobs - North Carolina Public School Jobs

some local counties districts have their own like these

WCPSS: Job Openings

or

Human Resources

or national sites like

Teaching Jobs US, Education Jobs, Special Education Teacher Jobs

or

Teaching Jobs - Where School Teachers & Administrators Find Jobs - USREAP



It's a lot of ground to cover IF there are any jobs.


I did a few state sites and the teachers-teachers site. The school saw my application and contacted me 24 hours later. We did a phone interview and FAXED my references.
They did all the paper work for licensing. (On a side, I have left that district for ethical reasons and went to another system).
I just cut a check for the fees. Depends on the districts and how well you sell yourself...
Focus on one or two areas you would like to go and work the schools close to there.
COntact the counties / districts through HR or directly to the school principal...

Try Alaska or Northern Virgina (NoVA)...
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Old 01-23-2011, 06:24 PM
 
2,596 posts, read 2,689,564 times
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The first thing I would advise is to look for jobs in the area where you currently live, or the area where you went to school. You will be at a much greater advantage because of your ability to network, to meet people in real life and to use contacts in the school system. The likelihood of landing a job through randomly applying in far-away states is not strong... not impossible, but not strong, particularly in this economy.

When I had to move out of state years ago, I looked up every school district in a 30 mile radius of where I was going to be living. You have to remember that every school district does their own thing and you have to approach them directly. Yes, some states may have databases that list available jobs, but probably not all districts use them. You should put in your application (usually done online) and wait to see if there are any available vacancies. You will need to check every day because once a vacancy is posted, the principal will probably have 60 resumes by the next day, more by the end of the week, and that is without counting the people who actually live near that school, who heard about the vacancy via word of mouth months before it posted and had a chance to let the principal know they would be interested.

It's notable that this process will be very time consuming (many applications can take hours to complete) and expensive (many districts want original copies of your transcripts, original letters of reference, etc.) If you are not certified in that state, it's less likely you will be hired. In the past, that wasn't true, but in this economy, the principal will have plenty of fully qualified applicants. In many states, schools have to report how many faculty aren't fully certified, including teachers on probationary or one-year temporary certification.

It's also important to realize that your chances in this economy are pretty low. 5 years ago, 10 years ago, it was much easier to move out of state and find something. Simply put, many MANY teachers have gotten laid off in the past 3 years. There is high competition for any job, sub lists are full in many states and great, experienced teachers sit unemployed because there just aren't any positions. That's why your chances are better if you network in your area, try to get in to meet the principals, try to sub if you can get on the list. Often these jobs are "posted" for legal reasons, but the principal already knows who they plan to hire before they even start the interviews--usually someone with an inside connection.
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Old 01-23-2011, 07:48 PM
Status: "FEAR won in 2014." (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Mid-Town
7,616 posts, read 10,281,883 times
Reputation: 5229
And newer teachers should complete the PRAXIS II. Many states require that or extensive experience.
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Old 01-23-2011, 08:10 PM
 
10,381 posts, read 16,668,174 times
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I would not suggest the praxis II for any state except the one you live in until you have a good idea of where you may move to. There is not one Praxis II for all states and many will not reciprocate the different tests. And, of course, they are not inexpensive.
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Old 01-23-2011, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Leaving fabulous Las Vegas, Nevada
1,566 posts, read 3,413,520 times
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When I moved, I got my leads from Education Week and USREAP. In my current position, I get a lot of unsolicited resumes from job seekers. I have to delete them because they aren't following the process outlined by Human Resources which has a web page. I wouldn't waste my time by doing that for sure.
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Old 01-23-2011, 10:06 PM
 
11,151 posts, read 9,502,015 times
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I was hired for a job in California while I was still teaching in New York City. I completed an online application, then had a phone interview and, after checking my references via phone and/or fax, the district offered me a job. So it can be done, but I imagine it's pretty rare.
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Old 01-24-2011, 06:26 AM
 
2,596 posts, read 2,689,564 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark of the Moon View Post
I was hired for a job in California while I was still teaching in New York City. I completed an online application, then had a phone interview and, after checking my references via phone and/or fax, the district offered me a job. So it can be done, but I imagine it's pretty rare.
Out of curiosity, was this recently, like in the last year? I had a similar experience, but it was more than 5 years ago before the economy tanked. Looking back, I have to attribute it to a fair amount of luck and fortunate circumstances, even though I was well qualified for the job. I don't imagine I would have the same success if I was trying to do the same today when most areas have a glut of qualified teachers already living there and searching for work
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Old 01-24-2011, 07:19 AM
Status: "FEAR won in 2014." (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Mid-Town
7,616 posts, read 10,281,883 times
Reputation: 5229
Quote:
Originally Posted by toobusytoday View Post
I would not suggest the praxis II for any state except the one you live in until you have a good idea of where you may move to. There is not one Praxis II for all states and many will not reciprocate the different tests. And, of course, they are not inexpensive.

I just know that Ohio, TN, NM, and NC all wanted to know if I had passed the PRAXIS II. I had originally thought my test was not praxis (took it 1991 and MI had changed over to the MTTC around 1995) and Ohio would not even talk to me without it. The other states all wanted a copy before going to far into an interview--and I had over 10 years experience. If I had not taken the PRAXIS II NC would not have hired me.
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