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Old 05-31-2012, 08:53 PM
 
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I will be graduating in December 2012 with my bachelors degree in Science in Education. I will be able to teach K-3 and also obtaining my 4-5 endorsement. I also live in Ohio (Graduating from Bowling Green State University!!)

OK my two questions
1. Which more likely to hire private schools or public schools?
2. Which states are more likely to hire teachers in 2013?

I also know all about the pay difference between private and public schools

Please Help!!

When I say private do not mean boarding schools
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Old 05-31-2012, 09:58 PM
 
1,830 posts, read 2,804,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by middles View Post
I will be graduating in December 2012 with my bachelors degree in Science in Education. I will be able to teach K-3 and also obtaining my 4-5 endorsement. I also live in Ohio (Graduating from Bowling Green State University!!)

OK my two questions
1. Which more likely to hire private schools or public schools?
2. Which states are more likely to hire teachers in 2013?

I also know all about the pay difference between private and public schools

Please Help!!

When I say private do not mean boarding schools

Univ. of Toledo grad here. graduated December of 2003. student taught in toledo public (bowsher high school). small world haha.

as to your questions

1.) tough question - having never applied for a private school job i really can't say. i would imagine private school jobs since they are looking for an exact candidate and have more flexibility would be tougher. like for instance if you read the job board for the diocese of cincinnati. all the elementary jobs say "catholic candidate preferred". not being catholic myself that right there limits me. i guess the easy answer would be since there are way more public school students than private ones you need fewer teachers meaning the market itself is slim as it is for private school jobs. plus since urban catholic dioceses such as toledo are seeing decreases in enrollment that limits you right there.

2.) anything south of the ohio river is your best bet or west of the mississippi. i have friends who went to BG who ended up in Raleigh, NC area and the Charlotte, NC area. I left Ohio in 2004 for Greenville, SC due to Ohio's ever so difficult job market for teachers.

side note - a friend of mine from high school went back to school at BG to get her k-12 art license. just finished her student teaching i think either last semester or this spring semester. she's married and is unlikely to relocate job wise. i told her good luck finding an art teacher job in the area as her and her husband are almost firmly planted in BG.

advice - be open to any employment possibility within reason. also don't settle for just a job. i had some small rural districts in NC offer me but i politely declined since i knew i would not be happy personally. female friend of mine who went to OU (athens) got a job in Durham, NC and left 1 month into it due to being home sick (even though she moved down there with a friend from high school / college who got a job in the same district).
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Old 05-31-2012, 10:01 PM
 
Location: mass
2,905 posts, read 6,422,327 times
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Depends on where you live and what you are considering "private".

I would imagine a prestigious private school would be the hardest to get into.

Here in Massachusetts, you probably would have an easier time getting a job at a "private" Catholic school because they are not required to hire teachers who have passed the teacher exam.

However, the pay is much lower than public school.
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Old 05-31-2012, 10:35 PM
 
1,830 posts, read 2,804,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mommytotwo View Post
Depends on where you live and what you are considering "private".

I would imagine a prestigious private school would be the hardest to get into.

Here in Massachusetts, you probably would have an easier time getting a job at a "private" Catholic school because they are not required to hire teachers who have passed the teacher exam.

However, the pay is much lower than public school.

but wouldn't a lax in licensing requirements open up the candidate pool making it tougher to get hired? she may have an easier time fulfilling the employment requirements but so too will everyone else presumably.
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Old 06-01-2012, 06:05 AM
 
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For experience, I would apply to the catholic schools. Yes, it does not pay as well, but here in Ny (at least in our school) they are looking for teachers. We have had a horrible time in the last two years getting suitable candidates.
From just getting out of college, I would look for experience first.
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Old 06-01-2012, 07:00 AM
 
12,455 posts, read 27,084,912 times
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I'm not sure you can really narrow it down to state, or private vs. public. For instance, you are more likely to get a job in any of the city schools in Pennsylvania but because we have a glut of teachers in our state all the time and the vast majority of them are certified, you would be pretty far down the list for even those jobs. Oh, and because many of the city schools have had budget cuts and firings, those recently fired teachers would be the most likely to be hired. And all of those certified teachers that can't find jobs will also be applying for jobs at private schools. Pennsylvania has a very strong teachers union too so our ed major grads often want to stay in state. I would scratch Pennsylvania off the list.

My best suggestion would be to stay in Ohio and get in the system by subbing. Look for a long term sub position. You are most likely to get a job where you student taught or your own home town. It's hard for administration to fire teachers, so they are more likely to hire someone with a good track record that they know.
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Old 06-01-2012, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
3,677 posts, read 3,257,433 times
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A friend of mine got a job at a Catholic school a few years ago. She would've killed for a public school job but you pretty much have to have a relative on the school board to get those jobs right out of college. This is in NJ. Pay is way, way lower than public school which is why there's a lot of turnover in Catholic schools. As soon as a Catholic school teacher has built up a resume they are off to the lucrative public schools (unless they stick around for free tuition for their own kids)!
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Old 06-01-2012, 12:50 PM
 
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Maybe look at various Charter Schools?

Was just reading some raw numbers -- Texas Charter schools -- there are over 170 of them now, covering areas from Alternative and Drop Out Recovery to Upper End Serious College Prep -- have something like 120,000 students, but (here is the Ka-Ching for you) there are at least another 50,000 to 60,000 -- and more -- students backlisted and waiting in line, waiting on Schools, AND (here is where you come in) Teachers!

The harvest is great, but the workers are few.
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Old 06-01-2012, 08:22 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
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I don't know about your area, but there are plenty of private schools that aren't catholic. There are college-preparatory schools, alternative schools, Waldorf schools, etc. Some have their own educational philosophy that would be different from what you've been trained in. It would pay to do some research.
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Old 06-02-2012, 07:37 PM
 
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Thanks for all of that information, I appreciated any tips and advice I can get!
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