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Old 09-26-2007, 11:15 PM
 
1,650 posts, read 2,354,251 times
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Has anyone ever made a successful transition out of teaching? I teach first grade in Arizona and truthfully after dealing with the class I have this year, I want out. I have one student with bipolar disorder, one with some other neurological condition, and the other two are friends with the other two. They do nothing other than cause trouble when they are together and I am sick of it. I have tried all sorts of discipline. Nothing works. I have actually had to take a day off just to get away from them. I have bills I have to pay and I just want to know how one could possibly make a transition out of teaching.
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Old 09-27-2007, 12:57 PM
 
Location: SD
896 posts, read 3,063,886 times
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I don't know if it's about making a transition or just giving up. In 2000, I didn't renew my contract with my school for the following year. Luckily, I had a financial cushion (a husband) and spent two months job searching. I landed a position doing special events for an association. One of my friends decided to open a tutoring company and she enjoys it, picking and choosing her own students. Good Luck. Every job change is stressful.
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Old 09-27-2007, 01:12 PM
 
474 posts, read 1,824,657 times
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Default Apparently A Different System In Illinois?

Dear 'Bluebelt'.

A few years ago, my son became a teacher's aid to several handicapped grammar school children. In that public school system, the handicapped kids were in a special group with a special teacher and several certified teacher's aids for support. So in this sense, the regular teacher's didn't have ADDITIONAL problems with the ruling of "No child left behind".
Incidentally, many teachers in Illinois feel it is a bogus situation with "No child left behind".
So rather than giving up, why not 'start a fight' (I am trying to be humorous) to convince your school district to separate the handicapped kids from the normal ones?
School teaching is definitely a vocation to keep. Because nobody (in the usual sense) can eliminate your job. For example, a typical company cannot down size you due to lost sales volumes and profits. And there are many company layoffs. What is the most increasing product in the U.S.? Well, it is new generations of kids.
So with teaching, you are basically guaranteed employment for your lifetime - - if you hang in there.
Perhaps the grass looks greener on the opposite side of the fence. However, once you get there perhaps you are convinced otherwise. Normally, it takes a new employee about two years to discover all of the skeletons (internal problems) inside a company.

Carter Glass
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Old 09-27-2007, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Sacramento
13,462 posts, read 16,199,890 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HOWELL_STREET View Post
So rather than giving up, why not 'start a fight' (I am trying to be humorous) to convince your school district to separate the handicapped kids from the normal ones?
Carter Glass
Handicapped kids come in all shapes and sizes. Placing kids with ADD or bipolar into classes with kids suffering from spina bifida, downs syndrome and cerebral palsy doesn't work, and is unfair to both sets of disadvantaged kids.
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Old 09-27-2007, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Hollywood/Brookfield, IL
677 posts, read 3,092,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewToCA View Post
Handicapped kids come in all shapes and sizes. Placing kids with ADD or bipolar into classes with kids suffering from spina bifida, downs syndrome and cerebral palsy doesn't work, and is unfair to both sets of disadvantaged kids.
Plus, the trend in education right now is inclusion rather than exclusion. My guess is that within the next fifty years most schools won't have separate special ed classes at all.
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Old 09-27-2007, 03:02 PM
 
8,241 posts, read 10,481,603 times
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Default every teacher knows what you're talking about...

Some years it seems like you are being pulled in a million directions. It's hard (impossible) to be everything to every child, especially in the public schools. I would suggest that you think hard about WHY you want to be a teacher. Then list the down side to being a teacher. Decide which outweighs the other. If it's the 'kind of kid' you've been getting in your classroom (no judgement here), then look into private schools. The pay might be lower, but *usually* you'll get a more homogenous group.
Take a deep breath and good luck.
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Old 09-28-2007, 09:25 AM
 
284 posts, read 1,201,601 times
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Check your contract, and then, decide if you need to leave ASAP or if you can stay to the end of your contract. When you decide to leave, look for something you want to do, something you have a passion for doing.

I recommend that you really look at your classroom situation. Are you using all the available resources that you may have in your school and in your district? For example, is there a teacher in your building or even in the district who is known for being able to handle all discipline and special need situations? If so, get advice from that teacher immediately. Go observe his/ her class. Do whatever you have to do to make this a successful situation for you and for your class. You might be surprised how many untapped resources schools and districts have to help with these types of situations.

If you decide to stay thru the year, you do not have the right to give up. You have a group of kids at a very critical point in their educational journeys who are depending on you to get control of your classroom and not let your stress get the best of you. I know this may sound harsh, but I really hope that focusing on all the kids that need you to be strong and in control will give you the fortitude to make your situation a success.
I wish you the best in making the right decision for not only yourself, but also for your students.
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Old 09-28-2007, 06:18 PM
 
2,106 posts, read 5,531,992 times
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if you're miserable, get out and do it now if you can. some people seem to expect teachers to put up with all sorts of crap that no other professional would have to tolerate because they work with children. i think too many people think of teaching as a vocation in the clerical sense, rather than as a career choice with the same potential for satisfaction or misery as any other. if the latter is what you are experiencing more often than not, then it's time to move on. the good of all child-kind should not enter into your decision-making; you are not a sacrificial lamb. you have to do what is best for yourself and your own family, if you have one. if being a teacher makes you unhappy, you won't be a good one, anyway.

good luck, whatever you decide.
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Old 02-13-2010, 10:22 AM
 
2 posts, read 17,167 times
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I have been teaching for over 14 years. I would recommend that you figure out why you are unhappy where you are at and what is causing it. For many, it is the lack of support from the administration. In many cases, it is actually the pressure from the administration that causes the stress and frustration, not the kids. When I first started teaching I was about to quit teaching. Switching to a different district with a new administration made all the difference in the world. Good luck.
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Old 02-13-2010, 11:48 AM
 
20,797 posts, read 32,418,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewToCA View Post
Handicapped kids come in all shapes and sizes. Placing kids with ADD or bipolar into classes with kids suffering from spina bifida, downs syndrome and cerebral palsy doesn't work, and is unfair to both sets of disadvantaged kids.
But it is fair to the non-handicapped/LD kids


Quote:
Originally Posted by ahava View Post
Plus, the trend in education right now is inclusion rather than exclusion. My guess is that within the next fifty years most schools won't have separate special ed classes at all.
I sure hope not. What a horrible thing for everyone involved. It eliminates the one on one the special ed kids NEED and disrupts the classroom for the non-special ed kids. The over the top demands of families with kids with special needs is one of the main reasons schools are struggling so much now. Schools have to bend over backwards to provide everything and anything for a handful of kids at the expense of the rest of the school.
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