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Old 10-27-2007, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Eagan, Minnesota
751 posts, read 902,192 times
Reputation: 151

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Has anybody here gone from corporate America jobs to teaching and what was the experience like? Any regrets? I have a background in Economics and I have been searching for a good MBA program in Finance, but lately, I have been thinking that maybe I am in the wrong field. I love Economics, financial research and I am very analytical, but I dislike the BS aspect of the corporate world. I would not mind making 50% less, if I knew that I could go to a job that I truly enjoy and maybe have a job that has some "true meaning" other than pleasing your boss or increasing "shareholder's value". Any thoughts?
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Old 10-27-2007, 05:19 PM
 
Location: in a house
3,574 posts, read 13,114,113 times
Reputation: 2341
Quote:
Originally Posted by lukeache View Post
Has anybody here gone from corporate America jobs to teaching and what was the experience like? Any regrets? I have a background in Economics and I have been searching for a good MBA program in Finance, but lately, I have been thinking that maybe I am in the wrong field. I love Economics, financial research and I am very analytical, but I dislike the BS aspect of the corporate world. I would not mind making 50% less, if I knew that I could go to a job that I truly enjoy and maybe have a job that has some "true meaning" other than pleasing your boss or increasing "shareholder's value". Any thoughts?
you'll be trading to the BS in education..... and little respect, depending on what level you teach secondary/post-secondary. Be sure your eyes are wide open, because it is not any easier.
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Old 10-28-2007, 08:37 AM
 
474 posts, read 2,333,574 times
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Default As Mm_mary Mentions...

People are people everywhere. So you will find some good ones and also bad ones in any vocation. On the positive side, if you are a teacher, nobody is going to constantly look over your shoulder and tell you to 'hurry up, hurry up... we are behind our deadlines'.

In the past, I went through something like this in my electronics career. My boss kept putting pressue on me to 'hurry up' but then I finally realized that he had this particular assignment sitting on his desk for about three weeks - - without doing anything about it. So then, I was less concerned about the situation when he shouted 'hurry up'.

As a college instructor, the only thing you have to do is to present the subject to students who may or may not care. With a corporate scenairo, you will always have to work with a very nerve - racking (sp?) time table.

Carter Glass
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Old 10-28-2007, 12:47 PM
9/9
 
Location: Durham, NC
383 posts, read 473,291 times
Reputation: 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by HOWELL_STREET View Post
People are people everywhere. So you will find some good ones and also bad ones in any vocation. On the positive side, if you are a teacher, nobody is going to constantly look over your shoulder and tell you to 'hurry up, hurry up... we are behind our deadlines'.
True, you will just hear "hurry up, hurry up ... we are behind our pacing guides."
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Old 10-28-2007, 03:27 PM
 
Location: St Augustine
604 posts, read 4,308,825 times
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I am going thru the "transition to teaching" program in florida. Its meant for non ed majors so they can get certified for K-12 school teaching. It is about 21 credits. Check if your state offers a similiar program.
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Old 10-30-2007, 02:28 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,323 posts, read 55,131,075 times
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I did that for 2 semesters at a California Community College-taught Political Science.

I taught mainly just-outta-HS teenagers and older adults going back to college.

Being 31 myself at that time, I thought it was a neat experience and when I decided to return to private enterprise, I felt refreshed and refocused. It was like a vacation, only not.

Dont get me wrong, it wasnt easy, but it was worth it.
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Old 10-30-2007, 05:12 AM
 
431 posts, read 1,977,420 times
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I feel your pain. I jumped ship from corporate america and currently working for a nonprofit and let me tell you, it's the same B.S. and there is a lot of "profit" to be made in a non profit as well. so now i make less money and in the same boat. so do your research. teaching is no walk in the park.
I have a friend that was an MBA (accountant) working at Goldman Sachs--about as corporate as you can get. He was sick to his stomach from dealing with them and quit and joined the Peace Corps. Talk about drastic! He met his wife in Uzbekistan and now he's back in the states. He is working as an accountant again though but he found a middle ground for himself. He worked for the govt, and recently found a new job working for a small private construction company. he is much happier. Maybe you should stay within your field that you already love but somewhere a little bit more laid back. Trust me, the B.S. you will find everywhere.
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Old 02-10-2009, 10:27 AM
 
1 posts, read 10,671 times
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Jumped into education 5 years ago. I am now earning the same pay as I did back then as a general manager for YUM Brands Inc. I would recommend teaching to anyone who has a good track record with kids. There is definitely alot less BS in education than in corporate life.
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Old 02-14-2009, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Unfortunately, in the south US
169 posts, read 503,798 times
Reputation: 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by lukeache View Post
Has anybody here gone from corporate America jobs to teaching and what was the experience like? Any regrets? I have a background in Economics and I have been searching for a good MBA program in Finance, but lately, I have been thinking that maybe I am in the wrong field. I love Economics, financial research and I am very analytical, but I dislike the BS aspect of the corporate world. I would not mind making 50% less, if I knew that I could go to a job that I truly enjoy and maybe have a job that has some "true meaning" other than pleasing your boss or increasing "shareholder's value". Any thoughts?
I can tell you this... I taught with a lady who came from"corporate America" a few years back and all she could tell people is that she used to be in "corporate America". I dont think she could get past the lower pay, lack of respect, and amount of demands that were put on her as a teacher. She was quite negative about the whole thing and luckily moved on to something else. I agree with the previous post, just make sure you are fully aware of what you are getting into. It is not all peaches and cream. I think people that love teaching have it in their blood. I would suggest volunteering or better yet do some substitute teaching to see the real world behind it. Good luck!
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Old 02-14-2009, 01:39 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,875 posts, read 42,085,992 times
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Hmmm, a degree in Econ. No education background except you've attended school? Ok-with your Econ background you'll be teaching US History, maybe World History, possibly Government. Or all three. Five or six classes per day times 45 minutes times thirty students per class. By the averages, each class will have three or four students with Individual Education Plans that require you to individualize their instruction. Depending on the course it may also be one that is tested for NCLB which means you will be observed regularly for best practice and pacing adherence. Also by the averages you will probably also have at least three students in each class who have already failed the course at least once, one homeless/foster home child and about half who do not have both parents in the home.
Point is this: as a teacher I applaud your exploring that option but please do not fall into the "anyone can teach, we've all gone to school" mindset. Oh by the way, I also left the corporate world for teaching but my degree was education.

Last edited by North Beach Person; 02-14-2009 at 01:40 PM.. Reason: grammar
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