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Old 06-21-2013, 07:30 AM
 
8,241 posts, read 10,441,355 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skoro View Post
Because they select the students who attend their schools, rather than being forced to accept all who appear at their door.
That's right. It's called PRIVATE education.
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Old 06-21-2013, 07:30 AM
 
Location: Middle America
17,706 posts, read 15,126,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mimimomx3 View Post
Woah, I must disagree. Why are some of the best schools in the US private schools? I refer to schools like St. Pauls, Deerfield, and a host of other independent, college prep schools? There's nothing wrong with private schools that are run like a business. They're very effective at giving parents and students what they want, and letting teachers teach in a way that best meets the needs of their students.
I specifically stated that I was talking about for-profit entities, not simply private schools, many of which are nonprofit, and speak exclusively from my own experience. I have seen the meeting of student needs sacrificed when meeting the needs stands in the way of making the most cash possible. When you are for-profit, your bottom line is king, regardless of what it means for the welfare of the students.
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Old 06-21-2013, 07:32 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Octa View Post
If I recall from many months ago, you're the poster who's a staunch libertarian. Of course you would believe that.
You are correct. I would love nothing more than to privatize education. Parents have lost sight of the value of education. Schools are paid for by taxes and parents don't actually write a check for that education. Many parents don't even pay taxes....so they don't value education- or teachers. When parents actually see how much money they are paying for their schools, teachers, supplies, and the cursed administrators, you will see that education and teachers will be respected more, as they are in most other foreign countries where education is not a "right", it's a privilege.
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Old 06-21-2013, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Middle America
17,706 posts, read 15,126,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mimimomx3 View Post
No teacher in his/her right mind would ever diagnose a student. A teacher can- and should- give factual information to a parent about their child's classroom behavior and academic performance.

Uh oh, did a teacher tell you your child wasn't a) gifted or b)couldn't focus or c)couldn't sit still? Those are big issues for parents that they usually don't want to hear. Of course, it's the messenger's fault....
And means that the teacher is "DIAGNOSING WITH ADD OR AUTISM!!!" It's amazing how many parents don't want to accept behavioral data when it's right in front of them, and, when presented with the opportunity to advocate for their children's needs, choose not to do so.
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Old 06-21-2013, 07:33 AM
 
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Originally Posted by skoro View Post
Because most who gripe long and loud about teacher salaries have been in classrooms and think they know what teaching is like, but they've never analyzed systems.
Exactly. I suggest everyone find their school district's payroll and take a look. It's shocking.
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Old 06-21-2013, 07:34 AM
 
8,241 posts, read 10,441,355 times
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Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
I specifically stated that I was talking about for-profit entities, not simply private schools, many of which are nonprofit, and speak exclusively from my own experience. I have seen the meeting of student needs sacrificed when meeting the needs stands in the way of making the most cash possible. When you are for-profit, your bottom line is king, regardless of what it means for the welfare of the students.
Ok, my mistake. I'm talking about private, non profit schools. Big difference, you're correct.
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Old 06-21-2013, 07:41 AM
 
1,285 posts, read 716,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mimimomx3 View Post
You are correct. I would love nothing more than to privatize education. Parents have lost sight of the value of education. Schools are paid for by taxes and parents don't actually write a check for that education. Many parents don't even pay taxes....so they don't value education- or teachers. When parents actually see how much money they are paying for their schools, teachers, supplies, and the cursed administrators, you will see that education and teachers will be respected more, as they are in most other foreign countries where education is not a "right", it's a privilege.
The US is probably the only developed country where education is the most privatized. In other countries, education is heavily subsidized from pre-k through the university level. Those countries you are talking about must be somewhere in the third world.
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Old 06-21-2013, 08:04 AM
 
8,241 posts, read 10,441,355 times
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Originally Posted by Octa View Post
The US is probably the only developed country where education is the most privatized. In other countries, education is heavily subsidized from pre-k through the university level. Those countries you are talking about must be somewhere in the third world.
Access and availability of education throughout the world is NOT a given, unlike in the US. Even if schools are subsidized, some families simply cannot afford to send their children to school. This is a great TED talk about education overseas: When education is not a given: 8 inspiring TED Talks | TED Blog
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Old 06-21-2013, 08:26 AM
 
1,445 posts, read 666,104 times
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Originally Posted by mimimomx3 View Post
Exactly. I suggest everyone find their school district's payroll and take a look. It's shocking.
Shocking in what way? I can easily find payroll information for most of my kids teachers. The ones who I predict are around my own age generally make more money than I do.

The part that I find shocking in that a couple teachers who have been teaching for a long time, and really don't belong in the field make nearly twice what some of their younger counterparts make.
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Old 06-21-2013, 08:41 AM
 
1,445 posts, read 666,104 times
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Originally Posted by Sound of Reason View Post
Do you think that teachers are considerably underpaid for the amount of work that they do?


I look at people without an education who happen to have found work in fields such as real estate, construction, lawn maintenance, and the like, and many of them are pulling home six figures a year, whereas teachers who work far harder, it would seem, are pulling home less than fifty thousand dollars. Something seems wrong with this picture, especially when one considers that teachers take their work home with them, but many of these professions do not. Which profession has the most impact on the world? Would you say that teachers are paid "peanuts" for their workload?
Lawn maintenance workers make six figures? Maybe, and that would be a huge stretch, if you are the owner of a very large company that does lawn maintenance. That is maybe a $10 an hour job where I live, probably with very poor benefits.

How do you know how hard someone in real estate works or if they take their work home with them. I'm not a fan of the real estate profession at all. However to be successful and make six figures where I'd live you'd have to work very hard, and almost be continuously available to prospective buyers. Because if you won't someone else will. Do you have data supporting your point about those working in real estate. Real estate agents have to be available on weekends and evenings to show properties etc.

Where I live if I was a teacher at my age and assuming I'd worked in the field since graduating college I'd be making between $70 and $80 K.

I don't begrudge teachers what they make, but I don't support the assertions made in your thread. People also often tend to compare things from their own vantage point. All professions have good and bad points.
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