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Old 09-06-2013, 11:05 AM
 
Location: New York
167 posts, read 121,393 times
Reputation: 184

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Hey teachers!

I'm a current teacher-candidate enrolled in a graduate ED program (Master's in Teaching to be specific) and as you can imagine our profession is seemingly glorified in these classes. I come from a diverse district and I know, as well as from what I read here, that everything is not always controlled by teachers. What I mean is, my ED classes preach that there are a lot of choices we can make (skills we learn(ed) in our teacher preparation) in the classroom that influence our students' success. What I'm asking you guys here is: in what circumstances in your classroom do you feel mitigated by administration? Choices you'd like to make that you feel would work, but are not supported/prevented from doing by your administration? Obviously a huge example of this would be with standardized testing. A lot of teachers have plenty of material they'd like to include in their lessons; however, it is not necessary for the all mighty standardized tests. What say you?
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Old 09-06-2013, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,101 posts, read 67,354,306 times
Reputation: 27477
You barely have enough time to cover what's on the tests never mind extra material.
Save that for after the testing because if the scores drop they are going to look at you first.
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Old 09-07-2013, 07:11 AM
 
1,741 posts, read 2,673,883 times
Reputation: 1267
Quote:
Originally Posted by STB1220 View Post
Hey teachers!

I'm a current teacher-candidate enrolled in a graduate ED program (Master's in Teaching to be specific) and as you can imagine our profession is seemingly glorified in these classes. I come from a diverse district and I know, as well as from what I read here, that everything is not always controlled by teachers. What I mean is, my ED classes preach that there are a lot of choices we can make (skills we learn(ed) in our teacher preparation) in the classroom that influence our students' success. What I'm asking you guys here is: in what circumstances in your classroom do you feel mitigated by administration? Choices you'd like to make that you feel would work, but are not supported/prevented from doing by your administration? Obviously a huge example of this would be with standardized testing. A lot of teachers have plenty of material they'd like to include in their lessons; however, it is not necessary for the all mighty standardized tests. What say you?

speaking from experience all that matters is test scores. if you have the scores the admins are looking for they will let you run your classroom however you want and will barely stop by to eval you and or check on whats happening. i for example have a VERY high pass rate on the South Carolina US History End of Course Exam which is state administered so my admins pretty much leave me alone and let me do what I want as long as my scores remain where they are or higher. this allows me to sneak outside stuff in when i want to without penalty because well i know how to incorporate that stuff into the standards.
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Old 09-07-2013, 08:10 AM
 
Location: NoVA
13,477 posts, read 9,062,932 times
Reputation: 17827
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenvillebuckeye View Post
speaking from experience all that matters is test scores. if you have the scores the admins are looking for they will let you run your classroom however you want and will barely stop by to eval you and or check on whats happening. i for example have a VERY high pass rate on the South Carolina US History End of Course Exam which is state administered so my admins pretty much leave me alone and let me do what I want as long as my scores remain where they are or higher. this allows me to sneak outside stuff in when i want to without penalty because well i know how to incorporate that stuff into the standards.
That has been my experience.
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Old 09-07-2013, 09:12 AM
 
439 posts, read 777,118 times
Reputation: 564
Quote:
Originally Posted by STB1220 View Post
Hey teachers!

I'm a current teacher-candidate enrolled in a graduate ED program (Master's in Teaching to be specific) and as you can imagine our profession is seemingly glorified in these classes. I come from a diverse district and I know, as well as from what I read here, that everything is not always controlled by teachers. What I mean is, my ED classes preach that there are a lot of choices we can make (skills we learn(ed) in our teacher preparation) in the classroom that influence our students' success. What I'm asking you guys here is: in what circumstances in your classroom do you feel mitigated by administration? Choices you'd like to make that you feel would work, but are not supported/prevented from doing by your administration? Obviously a huge example of this would be with standardized testing. A lot of teachers have plenty of material they'd like to include in their lessons; however, it is not necessary for the all mighty standardized tests. What say you?
Even though the Labor Department classifies teachers as salaried, exempt professionals, teachers, especially in public education, DON'T have wide latitude in decision making. It is ALL top down, and teachers MUST follow orders, thanks to the fact principals have complete control over teachers (administrators are the only ones who really DO have professional decision-making ability but without any accountability for their actions since they are not supervised closely).

You don't follow orders from administrators, you can be "charged" with "insubordination" and written up or even fired for it.

You can supplement your required curriculum as long as it aligns with the district, state, and national standards, but you better not do things in LIEU of it.

There hasn't been true autonomy for teachers for several decades, not since the fraudulent A Nation at Risk report during the Reagan years. It has been downhill ever since. It has gotten worse in the past five years. If you teach in a Title I school, you basically have to jettison every other subject in order to teach to the test (math and language arts and has been expanded to include science and social studies, assuming there is ANY time at all to teach those). It made me sick the way the teachers and the kids were treated in the Title I school where I worked and from which I was illegally sacked.

They don't teach you ANY of this in ed school. I had to learn the truth the hard way.
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Old 09-07-2013, 09:21 AM
 
439 posts, read 777,118 times
Reputation: 564
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenvillebuckeye View Post
speaking from experience all that matters is test scores. if you have the scores the admins are looking for they will let you run your classroom however you want and will barely stop by to eval you and or check on whats happening. i for example have a VERY high pass rate on the South Carolina US History End of Course Exam which is state administered so my admins pretty much leave me alone and let me do what I want as long as my scores remain where they are or higher. this allows me to sneak outside stuff in when i want to without penalty because well i know how to incorporate that stuff into the standards.
That's increasingly less the case these days. In the old days, meaning just a few years ago, that was true.

If you are in a Title I school, you have NO freedom at all to do whatever you want. A lot of schools have mostly scripted curriculum.
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Old 09-07-2013, 02:50 PM
 
3,216 posts, read 5,090,077 times
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Teaching has become so automated that we're not that far off from a few technological innovations making the profession almost completely obsolete.
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Old 09-11-2013, 07:35 PM
 
1,741 posts, read 2,673,883 times
Reputation: 1267
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonysam View Post
That's increasingly less the case these days. In the old days, meaning just a few years ago, that was true.

If you are in a Title I school, you have NO freedom at all to do whatever you want. A lot of schools have mostly scripted curriculum.


I don't teach in a title 1 school. Our district is moving towards scripted curriculum but our building principal of 6 years now has talked to those of us who have a "proven system" that he'll back us up and support us in what we do again so long as results don't suffer.
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Old 09-12-2013, 04:24 AM
 
3,072 posts, read 3,864,403 times
Reputation: 6476
On the other hand, you might want to view Ivory's latest thread to see WHY such discretion is under control.
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