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Old 02-24-2008, 10:36 PM
 
Location: NC
43 posts, read 324,976 times
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Is it true that after getting a license, it is possible to take Praxis II and add other subjects to it?

For example, my Master's degree was in ESL. I have to take Praxis II... then I can apply for a license (I am thinking about teaching in NC, AL, GA or TN).

If I take different Praxis II in the future.... would it allow me to teach other subjects (like Math, Spanish, Early Childhood)? Or would I have to get another Master's degree in that area??

I am not sure that ESL is in demand (i know for sure that they need Math, Science and Spec. ed).... and I am thinking about a second specialization ...just in case.

I am confused here... Help me, please!

Thanks for any ideas!
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Old 02-24-2008, 11:04 PM
 
Location: Camberville
11,386 posts, read 15,968,745 times
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ESL is definitely in demand, however often the ESL teacher has little experience. In my high school, the Latin teacher was basically "strongly encouraged" to take TEFL courses over the summer and was in a classroom the next day. If you could pair ESL with special ed though, that's certainly a plus.

Spanish is also a very highly sought after specialty. More and more schools are ramping up their foreign language departments and there aren't enough foreign language teachers to fill these positions. If you excel at Spanish and are comfortable teaching it, that sounds more up your ally as an ESL specialist than math or science.

Sorry... I can't help you with the Praxis info! I *think* (at least for Georgia) you just take the exam with a reasonable amount of experience in an area. I've known English teachers to take the social studies Praxis and then teach a social studies course the next (and the teacher in question had degrees in philosophy and education, not English OR history). Special ed is definitely different, however, and the rules are probably more nuanced than I understand as an outside observer.
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Old 02-25-2008, 12:07 AM
 
Location: NC
43 posts, read 324,976 times
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Thank you for your answer, charolastra00!

I was thinking about going into Spanish teaching, as my Major was in Teaching of Foreign Languages and English as a Foreign (second) Language. I studied Latin and German at my Unuiversity as well, so maybe I could take some more classes in Latin and specialize in it . My native language is Russian, but it's definitely not in demand in the South.

P.S.: I do not have any experience in teaching yet. I have just completed my Master's degree. I am going to take Praxis soon (I cannot get a license without it).

Last edited by NataliNC; 02-25-2008 at 12:20 AM..
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Old 02-25-2008, 12:25 AM
 
Location: Camberville
11,386 posts, read 15,968,745 times
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You might actually be surprised about Russian language. I predict that it's going to get more popular again. Very few high schools have it- just like few schools offer Chinese- but that's more due to lack of qualified teachers than lack of demand. Latin is on the backslide and will probably be replaced with Chinese soon.

Just anecdotally, my high school in suburban Georgia (over 2500 students) had 10 Spanish teachers, 3 French teachers, and 1 Latin and German teacher... and I think they're beginning to build a Chinese program but they only have one teacher as of yet. But in any case, you can see where the demand lies. In just 4 years, we added 5 Spanish teachers. I think that's the general trend. Still, Russia's prominence on the world scale is rising again and more schools might begin adding Russian courses (though, to be sure, we're at least a decade- if not more- behind in our handling of Chinese language in public schools).
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Old 02-25-2008, 12:41 AM
 
Location: NC
43 posts, read 324,976 times
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Chinese's popularity is not surprising, they have a great population. Chinese is getting its place everywhere. The ranking of foreign languages is very interesting.
For example, the most common foreign languages (in secondary schools) in Russia are:
1. British English
2. German
3. French
4. Latin, Greek
5. Chinese or Japanese or Turkish (recently added)
Spanish and Italian are very rare.

It's a little bit different here, in the USA. I would love to teach Russian, but I don't think it'll be popular in the nearest future.
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Old 02-25-2008, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Midwest transplant
1,984 posts, read 4,777,897 times
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In most states, once you complete a major, receive a teaching degree and you've passed your subject praxis, you can take the Praxis II in other subjects, and if you pass it, it will be added to your certificate.
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Old 02-25-2008, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Boston
137 posts, read 904,670 times
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It depends on the state. My masters was in ESL but Massachusetts allowed me to add a second early childhood license. What state are you in?
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Old 02-25-2008, 07:35 PM
 
Location: NC
43 posts, read 324,976 times
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I am curently living in Alabama. But we are planning to move soon. We haven't decided where to yet... we're choosing between Georgia, Tennessee and North Carolina. North Carolina and Georgia are our numer one and two priorities.
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Old 02-25-2008, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Leaving fabulous Las Vegas, Nevada
3,836 posts, read 6,596,351 times
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It varies from state to state but you will have to take the coursework as well as take the Praxis for licensure. Some states/districts will pay for you to get the licensure in high needs areas, e.g. math, science, special education.
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Old 02-24-2009, 09:36 AM
 
1 posts, read 5,304 times
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i am a english teacher .i was graduated in cuba ,and in this moment i am living in the states .how can i be a teacher here ?.it has been a long time since i do not teach any student.i would like to.some people say that i have to do some tests like an essay .could you help me concerning it?
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