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Old 01-05-2009, 02:18 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
1,881 posts, read 4,942,093 times
Reputation: 1650

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I know this has probably been discussed, but let me give you a little background.

I have two associate degrees, a Bachelor's in Managment, and am thinking about getting a Master's in Education.

I teach full time for the Air Force right now. My students get college credit, 10 credits per session, acredited through the Southern Association of Colleges, and those credits are fully transferable to a 4 year University. I have an "occupational teaching certificate" from the Air Force (not sure if that is a real thing in the "civilian" world), and have over 3000 classroom hours.

In about 10 years, when I retire, I would like to teach in the public school systems.

My mom is convinced I'll be overqualified if I get a Master's degree.

Tuition is free for me, why not go? But will I be shooting myself in the foot?

Thanks!
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Old 01-05-2009, 02:46 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
16,842 posts, read 16,628,873 times
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Depends on your subject, masters command higher salaries so that may be an impediment. But, most systems require a MS after a few years of employment.
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Old 01-05-2009, 02:57 PM
f_m
 
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Most teacher payscales including info on MS and PhD, in that usually you get a bump up in pay. This is going to depend on location and subject of course.
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Old 01-05-2009, 02:59 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
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I understand that many schools want you to have a Masters after a few years, but what about entry level?
Thanks!
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Old 01-05-2009, 03:16 PM
 
11,151 posts, read 9,618,008 times
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If you don't have a state-issued teaching credential, you probably won't be able to find employment as a teacher -- certainly not in a public school. The exception would be if you were hired into a high-needs subject (typically math, science, special ed) under a temporary license. In that case, you'd have to complete coursework for your credential, within a specified length of time, while teaching. That coursework often ends in a Masters' Degree.

Would you be over-qualified starting out as a teacher with a Masters' Degree? Possibly. But, yes, you'd most likely have to get one within a few years anyway. More importantly, though, since you won't be able to find a job without some teacher preparation, you need to decide whether to take an undergraduate teacher prep program (a waste of time, IMHO), or complete it at the graduate level.
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Old 01-05-2009, 11:30 PM
 
Location: The Land of Lincoln
2,522 posts, read 2,775,720 times
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In financially strapped school districts, they opt for the teacher with fewer degrees to whom they can pay a smaller salary. That is the only disadvantage as I see it.
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Old 01-06-2009, 12:09 AM
 
51 posts, read 125,952 times
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In my state, a masters degree is required within five years of receiving an initial certification to teach. Without it you cannot get re-certified. A masters is a must. Overqualified? No way!
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Old 01-06-2009, 12:19 AM
NCN
 
14,087 posts, read 12,457,266 times
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Our county public school system has the same type of college credit classes. If you are in the education system, the higher the education qualifications the better. You could end up in a small community college at a higher pay scale. Don't ever turn down the opportunity to get more education. I am retired, but I am still planning to take classes just to keep my mind occupied. You can never learn too much.
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Old 01-06-2009, 12:32 AM
 
Location: mass
2,905 posts, read 4,602,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by accept-logic View Post
In my state, a masters degree is required within five years of receiving an initial certification to teach. Without it you cannot get re-certified. A masters is a must. Overqualified? No way!
Same here in Mass.

If you've got it from the start, it won't matter.
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Old 01-06-2009, 12:41 AM
 
51 posts, read 125,952 times
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Mass is where I teach too.
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