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Old 10-30-2010, 09:19 AM
 
Location: compton
138 posts, read 295,469 times
Reputation: 77

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jasper12 View Post
When I taught high school, I had an african american female, who would sit in her desk, with her legs spread out wide. She managed to make a school uniform of white shirt, and blue skirt look like a hootchie mama hooker outfit. She did not do any assignments, and was as dumb as a rock. She would make derogatory comments to me about my clothing, and once asked during class when the last time was that I had "any"...When I sent her to the Dean for that remark, she stated she was just asking about any pencils, as she needed one. Then, when I flunked her, she stated that I called her a "dumb N-word". We had to have a meeting with the school principal and her Mother, and this girl flat out lied about me. Guess what? She was passed in the class, and I was written up...It was the last straw of a 20 year teaching career. I decided to leave...and don't regret it at all...
That girl is cool as hell
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Old 10-30-2010, 09:51 AM
 
2,911 posts, read 2,880,131 times
Reputation: 3498
I feel you. I teach a college prep subject with the kind of rigorous curriculum that all the studies show helps build readiness for university level classes. Last year our district re-instituted formal tracking, but the default mode is college prep, which requires four more credits than the general track and which is based on the state four-year university entrance requirements. The only way to switch tracks is for the parents to come to the school to sign them out in the counselors' office.

Our school's freshmen typically enter reading on a fifth-grade level. They have serious deficiencies in their basic subjects, a situation that results in their being enrolled in classes designed to help them pass the state exams rather than in the courses usually associated with their grade level. The administration also places more capable students in "double-dose" classes, not to help the students pass, which they would do without any help, but to increase their scores to higher Advanced and Proficient levels in order to help the school's quality rating. I find these practices to be egregious examples of what Diane Ravitch calls institutionalized fraud.

Where it affects me in the classroom, is that I now have super-large classes of students who lack basic skills and who have no desire or interest in either my subject or in college (at this point in their lives). These students frequently compensate for this mismatch by being disruptive. In some classes, the critical mass has been reached, and things are deteriorating quickly.

First term report cards were issued yesterday. More than half of the students are failing, despite me giving them unlimited retakes on proficiency tests and extended time on written exams. I gave them required progress reports at mid-term, then two additional progress reports-- two weeks before the end of the term, when there was still time to bring up their grades, and this week, when the grades had been turned in for the report cards to be printed.

Fortunately, the administration deals swiftly and firmly with serious transgressions--fights, assaults, arson, thefts, etc. We've already had about 15 expulsions so far this year. But the minor stuff that doesn't translate well on a discipline referral is more elusive to deal with. Our parents are not generally supportive, but fortunately I've been at this school for 18 years, and I taught many of my students' parents. That doesn't help so much with the conduct issues, but it does help prevent the parents' blaming me for their children's misbehavior, which, as jasper describes above, is all too common.

I probably have about 5-10 disruptive students in each of my basic classes, which average 29 students.
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Old 10-30-2010, 10:34 AM
 
20,793 posts, read 52,052,222 times
Reputation: 10463
Quote:
Originally Posted by antredd View Post
For me, I have mainly 7. Four boys and three girls. I can call their parents, take their recesses, time them out, even send them to the principal, and the end result is the same.

Student 1 likes to crawl, yes under his desk.
student 2 gets up out of his seat every two minutes just to go and talk to his friend sitting across the room.
Student 3 watches me the entire time so that she can pass notes to her friends, and I have to stop to tell her to pay attention to me, especially when I am instructing the class.
Student 4 doesn't do any work and talks to anyone I move her next.
Student 5 yells across the room and always needs to go to the bathroom, and just sits there and draws.
Student 6 plays with her girly toys and note pads that I have to take from her daily instead of doing her classwork.
Student 7 likes to bother girls by calling them names and making funny faces at them.

Some of you may think that this isn't quite bad, but, my other students feed off these 7 students' behavior, and I waste a lot of precious instructional time on disciplining them and getting them back on task.

Please share some your stories.
Quote:
Originally Posted by antredd View Post
This school year has been very challenging for me. I have a group of students who are totally needy. I have not ever had a class where almost all of my students are dealing with something, and can't focus, can't sit still, and can't complete assignments given without me standing over them 24/7. I am dealing with kids who are emotionally disturbed, defiant, and totally rebellious.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasper12 View Post
When I taught high school, I had an african american female, who would sit in her desk, with her legs spread out wide. She managed to make a school uniform of white shirt, and blue skirt look like a hootchie mama hooker outfit. She did not do any assignments, and was as dumb as a rock. She would make derogatory comments to me about my clothing, and once asked during class when the last time was that I had "any"...When I sent her to the Dean for that remark, she stated she was just asking about any pencils, as she needed one. Then, when I flunked her, she stated that I called her a "dumb N-word". We had to have a meeting with the school principal and her Mother, and this girl flat out lied about me. Guess what? She was passed in the class, and I was written up...It was the last straw of a 20 year teaching career. I decided to leave...and don't regret it at all...
Quote:
Originally Posted by lhpartridge View Post
I feel you. I teach a college prep subject with the kind of rigorous curriculum that all the studies show helps build readiness for university level classes. Last year our district re-instituted formal tracking, but the default mode is college prep, which requires four more credits than the general track and which is based on the state four-year university entrance requirements. The only way to switch tracks is for the parents to come to the school to sign them out in the counselors' office.

Our school's freshmen typically enter reading on a fifth-grade level. They have serious deficiencies in their basic subjects, a situation that results in their being enrolled in classes designed to help them pass the state exams rather than in the courses usually associated with their grade level. The administration also places more capable students in "double-dose" classes, not to help the students pass, which they would do without any help, but to increase their scores to higher Advanced and Proficient levels in order to help the school's quality rating. I find these practices to be egregious examples of what Diane Ravitch calls institutionalized fraud.

Where it affects me in the classroom, is that I now have super-large classes of students who lack basic skills and who have no desire or interest in either my subject or in college (at this point in their lives). These students frequently compensate for this mismatch by being disruptive. In some classes, the critical mass has been reached, and things are deteriorating quickly.

First term report cards were issued yesterday. More than half of the students are failing, despite me giving them unlimited retakes on proficiency tests and extended time on written exams. I gave them required progress reports at mid-term, then two additional progress reports-- two weeks before the end of the term, when there was still time to bring up their grades, and this week, when the grades had been turned in for the report cards to be printed.

Fortunately, the administration deals swiftly and firmly with serious transgressions--fights, assaults, arson, thefts, etc. We've already had about 15 expulsions so far this year. But the minor stuff that doesn't translate well on a discipline referral is more elusive to deal with. Our parents are not generally supportive, but fortunately I've been at this school for 18 years, and I taught many of my students' parents. That doesn't help so much with the conduct issues, but it does help prevent the parents' blaming me for their children's misbehavior, which, as jasper describes above, is all too common.

I probably have about 5-10 disruptive students in each of my basic classes, which average 29 students.
And most people in the general public can't comprehend WHY teachers are not in favor of merit pay based on student performance
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Old 10-30-2010, 12:03 PM
 
2,911 posts, read 2,880,131 times
Reputation: 3498
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
And most people in the general public can't comprehend WHY teachers are not in favor of merit pay based on student performance
One of the most frustrating aspects of my situation is that most of my students really could do the work if they had the intention, did the work, and tried to learn it. They would still need the extended time and opportunity for retakes, but most of them aren't "dumb". They just haven't had the prior knowledge and skills nor the academic habits that they need to be successful in advanced math, sciences, foreign languages, etc., BEFORE being put in these courses.

Then there are others who are just not up to the mental level and who, in my opinion, would benefit more from classes that will help them excel at the kinds of jobs they are more likely to seek. These are usually very good kids who don't blame the teacher when they fail.

The last group are the thugs, but forturnately, most of them do end up getting expelled fairly quickly. Even many of these are sweet kids who make the wrong choices when growing up in a gang-oriented culture. For the most part, they don't really involve the teachers in their disputes, even when the trouble spills over into the school.

I might go for merit pay if it also included combat pay!
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Old 10-30-2010, 01:10 PM
 
3,259 posts, read 5,062,728 times
Reputation: 1470
Quote:
Originally Posted by lhpartridge View Post
One of the most frustrating aspects of my situation is that most of my students really could do the work if they had the intention, did the work, and tried to learn it. They would still need the extended time and opportunity for retakes, but most of them aren't "dumb". They just haven't had the prior knowledge and skills nor the academic habits that they need to be successful in advanced math, sciences, foreign languages, etc., BEFORE being put in these courses.

Then there are others who are just not up to the mental level and who, in my opinion, would benefit more from classes that will help them excel at the kinds of jobs they are more likely to seek. These are usually very good kids who don't blame the teacher when they fail.

The last group are the thugs, but forturnately, most of them do end up getting expelled fairly quickly. Even many of these are sweet kids who make the wrong choices when growing up in a gang-oriented culture. For the most part, they don't really involve the teachers in their disputes, even when the trouble spills over into the school.

I might go for merit pay if it also included combat pay!
Yeah I agree, I am all about combat pay for any teacher who is willing to risk his or her life everyday at an inner city gang neighborhood.
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Old 10-30-2010, 03:49 PM
 
18,856 posts, read 30,196,784 times
Reputation: 25966
Check this link out...Teen Bullies Nun-Teacher
Caught On Tape: Teen Allegedly Bullies Teacher, Nun - News Story - KVIA El Paso

This is why teaching is just out of control. I did it for 20 years, and decided to get out. There is not enough money in the world to go to work and put up with this kind of abuse.
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Old 10-30-2010, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,754 posts, read 38,863,446 times
Reputation: 48430
All of them!

I work at a private school that exclusively enrolls students with behavioral issues. Most are autism spectrum disorders and are referrals from public districts who are not equipped to meet their needs. But we also have students whose behavioral concerns don't stem from ASDs. Overall, though, most of our students are at our school because their public schools did not have the appropriate resources to handle their extreme behavior.
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Old 11-01-2010, 01:37 AM
 
Location: VA
549 posts, read 1,681,723 times
Reputation: 334
Quote:
Originally Posted by antredd View Post
This school year has been very challenging for me. I have a group of students who are totally needy. I have not ever had a class where almost all of my students are dealing with something, and can't focus, can't sit still, and can't complete assignments given without me standing over them 24/7. I am dealing with kids who are emotionally disturbed, defiant, and totally rebellious.
At the beginning of the year, how much time did you spend going over procedures and class rules?

In my first year of teaching, I taught in a county (school district) that was very rigid. Lessons had to be taught by a certain time... which began immediately. It stressed me out because I never had the chance to spend an adequate amount of time teaching my students what I expected out of them. Instead, we had a quick discussion on it and reviewed it here and there. As a result, I had 3 very disruptive boys (out of 18). At least one of them would ruin everyone's day each day.

This year (my second year of teaching), I'm in a new county. The school district I'm in encourages spending the necessary time to explain procedures and rules. All new teachers were given a book called The First 30 Days. We were all also given a great classroom behavior management book as well. Contrary to where I taught last year, I felt like I was given an opportunity to teach these necessary foundations, rather than being rushed to teach 2nd graders grammar.

Now, it helps that I have a really good class this year. Some attribute the class' behavior to my instruction, while others admit that I was just blessed with a good class. Personally, I feel that I have good classroom management, but there are just some kids that are unmanageable.

These are some things I've explained to my whole class and have also enforced consistently:
-When correcting behavior, I don't explain myself in front of the class. It ruins the pace of my lesson and gives the student a chance to cause a bigger disruption. I find myself wanting to explain myself frequently, because most of the time the student will respond with "why????". Which leads me to my second point...

-If a student questions my decision in an inappropriate manner, the punishment is worsened. I will talk to my student at a later time, so I don't take up my other students' time but also so he and I have had a chance to cool down. I am also very open to the fact that I may have been wrong and listen to what he has to say. I'll even apologize to him in front of the class. However, I make a point that he knew not to disrupt the classroom with a big "why???" and that, in itself, is an offense. Even if he didn't do anything wrong initially...

-Separation. I know that most places (especially in elementary school) advocate for grouping student's seating. However, some students just can't handle sitting next to other students. Some even like being by themselves...

-When I need my students' attention, I tell them to empty their hands. When I say this, I hold my hands up in the air and shake my hands. I don't tell my students to do this, but they instinctively raise their hands too. I have 26 students now and about 3 or 4 of them will never raise their hands with everyone else. However, at least it's easier to see who's not paying attention

-Reward the good students! In all likelihood, this won't improve the behavior of the bad kids. Positive Behavioral Support (PBS) may say otherwise... but I don't have experience with this. The idea is that the students with behavior issues will see the good kids getting rewarded and will change their behavior so that they get rewarded too. However, I've found that the students with behavior issues are just too impulsive and don't really have a chance to earn those rewards. Whether or not this fixes behaviors, I think it's important to recognize and reward those students that are in control of themselves. They do, after all, choose to behave appropriately.
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Old 11-01-2010, 06:17 AM
 
18,856 posts, read 30,196,784 times
Reputation: 25966
The one issue I have with rewarding the "good" kids, is that a teacher next to me had an ice cream party, and if you turned in all of your homework, you got to have an ice cream sundae, if you did not turn in your homework, you could just watch the other kids enjoy their ice cream.

One little boy in that class, never turned in homework, his home life was the epitome of "dysfunctional". Another kid, who always turned in homework, had a wonderful life living with grandparents who doted on him.

So, I did not like that concept at all.

I agree, give everyone an opportunity to be successful.
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Old 11-01-2010, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Kingwood/Porter
262 posts, read 547,917 times
Reputation: 224
Student number 7 needs a referral to the office wherein you use the word "bullying" about twenty times.

Repeated name calling counts!
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