U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Teaching
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-05-2011, 08:23 AM
 
27,075 posts, read 18,512,640 times
Reputation: 16016

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by tgbwc View Post
Were you saying that 7,000 students is a large or small district? I was thinking that is small, but we are on county-wide systems.
I thought it was a decent size until I looked at all of the areas it encompassed. Now, it does seem small.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-05-2011, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Virginia
7,672 posts, read 11,659,944 times
Reputation: 3338
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magritte25 View Post
I thought it was a decent size until I looked at all of the areas it encompassed. Now, it does seem small.
I understand. It's all relative. You have a county broken up into smaller districts. My wife is from NW PA and her school district was much smaller than 7,000 students. That would be a big district. Now we are in a district with 177,000 students. Can you imagine? I don't know which way is better. It is amazing to me that people are even willing to run for the school board. I'm sure there are a lot of good people who don't because it is a full-time job being in charge of a district that large and they only get paid $20k a year.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2011, 07:30 AM
 
1 posts, read 1,640 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
I never said the bellyaching and complaining from teachers is here on this board. It's every single teacher I know in both PA and NJ. They complain about it all the time. Their spouses do to.
Then after hearing this so much from teachers, non-teachers around PA and NJ who don't know the facts talk about it all the time as if it's fact.

They mention it here and there as a "given" that teachers are very underpaid. So I posted this link so that perhaps a few people would look up the facts and stop making such claims.

Maybe it's just an NJ and eastern PA thing. Maybe teachers in the rest of the country never complain. Must be just geography and the circles I move in.

But I somehow doubt that. We hear it in the media, on TV shows, in general conversation all the time. How often do you hear "...and on a teacher's salary" or "..and you know what a teacher's salary is like"? As if everyone accepts that teachers are tossed a few peanuts for all their hard work. Some probably are underpaid for their performance, but most, at least in my geographic area, are not.
No, it is a western PA thing too. Same thing here. I think there may be some states where teachers are underpaid. PA is not one of them. Work it out on an hourly basis and include benefits, and I think you will be amazed. I am glad to see at least a few states are cracking down on these excessive benefits.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2011, 09:30 PM
 
Location: Central FL
1,382 posts, read 3,068,815 times
Reputation: 1174
PA is known for being the best state for teacher pay (compared to the cost of living). From what I hear, it's pretty much impossible to get a teaching job there for just this reason!

Now here in FL, it's a different story. My district is a revolving door of teachers. You can always get a job here. You will make $38,600 after 10 years, and insurance is a joke. ($800 a month for family insurance and you don't get dental, vision, or disability.) Oh and FL doesn't have tenure anymore either.

Teachers in places like PA, NJ, and WI are giving the profession a bad name and causing the public to revolt against education in general. Heck, in FL teachers haven't had raises in years. My husband is still making the same as last year, while $150 more is being taken out of his check each month for insurance. In Georgia, our district laid off 150 teachers, and gave the rest 10 unpaid furlough days PLUS a 2.8% pay cut. They are still doing that now, years and years later. (and they still have 600 resumes for a teaching job in a "bad" middle school).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2011, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Virginia
7,672 posts, read 11,659,944 times
Reputation: 3338
Quote:
Originally Posted by MovedfromFL View Post
They are still doing that now, years and years later. (and they still have 600 resumes for a teaching job in a "bad" middle school).
. 600 applications for 1 position is probably a reason why they don't feel a need to increase pay or benefits. For some reason we still have unfilled teaching positions. If I can find someone who wants to drive a bus there is a $1000 referral bonus.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2011, 09:24 AM
 
14,777 posts, read 12,349,614 times
Reputation: 18609
Quote:
Originally Posted by MovedfromFL View Post
PA is known for being the best state for teacher pay (compared to the cost of living). From what I hear, it's pretty much impossible to get a teaching job there for just this reason!

Now here in FL, it's a different story. My district is a revolving door of teachers. You can always get a job here. You will make $38,600 after 10 years, and insurance is a joke. ($800 a month for family insurance and you don't get dental, vision, or disability.) Oh and FL doesn't have tenure anymore either.

Teachers in places like PA, NJ, and WI are giving the profession a bad name and causing the public to revolt against education in general. Heck, in FL teachers haven't had raises in years. My husband is still making the same as last year, while $150 more is being taken out of his check each month for insurance. In Georgia, our district laid off 150 teachers, and gave the rest 10 unpaid furlough days PLUS a 2.8% pay cut. They are still doing that now, years and years later. (and they still have 600 resumes for a teaching job in a "bad" middle school).
Bad name?

NJ has one of the best public education systems in the country. How exactly are we giving it a bad name?

Just because things are bad in Florida they should be bad everywhere? Have you heard the term race to the bottom? Besides look how well treating teachers is working for their education system. By almost every measure Florida isn't even in the top half.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2011, 09:40 AM
 
2,612 posts, read 4,428,879 times
Reputation: 3925
Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
You obviously aren't looking in Bucks County. I think you need to check out a couple more school disticts. I'm financially supporting several teachers in my district who make over 70, who have NOT been working 25 years. In fact I just found some making 88,500 who have only worked 11-15 years. In my mid-30s I certainly didn't make 88 grand with my Master's!

This argument seems to be "I don't make that much so no one should." Does that also apply to engineers and computer science majors? I don't understand the logic that just because one person doesn't earn a certain amount of money with their degree, then no one should. Some degrees and careers pay more than others. If one person got a degree that doesn't pay as much as a teaching degree, then that's not the teacher's problem.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2011, 10:24 AM
 
3,252 posts, read 5,838,045 times
Reputation: 1575
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
You don't understand the 1/2 day Kindergarten model- up to 30 kids in the AM, up to another 30 in the PM, many of whom can't yet tie their shoes, button their coats or control their bowels and bladders when excited.
As you seem to be the expert on classroom issues without being a teacher I think you need to do a week long teaching internship somewhere and add to your knowledge base. Maybe Kindergarten, maybe a 9th grade resource class (since you're the expert here I don't have to tell you that means you have regular ed kids and mainstreamed Special Ed kids in the same class, usually about 33 or so total).
---------------------------------------------------------------------

(JMHO) I have to agree with ZZ4guy...

Though he/she is a better person than I am, for I could not contain my laughter.

So the skill set you state for Kindergarten (based on your post) is:
--Ability to tie someone else's shoes
--Button their coats
--Clean up after bowel/bladder issues

I could find you many a health care aide that would do it for likely half your salary.

I am glad someone is willing to do this, as it would never be me. Though I do dabble with teaching college students, that don't have any of the issues listed above (though there are other much more complex issues).

One thing that concerns me is the 30-kids-in-the-class thing, or the mainstreaming special ed with regular ed... Don't know where your school is, but I am glad I didn't grow up there. (We averaged around 6, and special ed didn't even go to the same school)

Though directed at the OP, a week-long teaching internship for me would be as valuable as learning the behavioral habits of the Peruvian tree frog.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2011, 02:07 PM
Status: "Keep your friends close and your enemies closer" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
30,271 posts, read 36,663,072 times
Reputation: 37506
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperSparkle928 View Post
---------------------------------------------------------------------

(JMHO) I have to agree with ZZ4guy...

Though he/she is a better person than I am, for I could not contain my laughter.

So the skill set you state for Kindergarten (based on your post) is:
--Ability to tie someone else's shoes
--Button their coats
--Clean up after bowel/bladder issues

I could find you many a health care aide that would do it for likely half your salary.

I am glad someone is willing to do this, as it would never be me. Though I do dabble with teaching college students, that don't have any of the issues listed above (though there are other much more complex issues).

One thing that concerns me is the 30-kids-in-the-class thing, or the mainstreaming special ed with regular ed... Don't know where your school is, but I am glad I didn't grow up there. (We averaged around 6, and special ed didn't even go to the same school)

Though directed at the OP, a week-long teaching internship for me would be as valuable as learning the behavioral habits of the Peruvian tree frog.

Sure you could put a Health Aide in to do those things. Then you'd complain that the Kindergarten class was costing too much because you'd still have the teacher there. Doing the things that they do which, in today's education world, means that when when that kid leaves Kindergarten he/she has the skills that a 1st grader had leaving that grade 20 years ago.

Last edited by toobusytoday; 12-04-2011 at 05:24 PM.. Reason: removed rude comment
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-04-2011, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,371 posts, read 28,765,792 times
Reputation: 14385
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
Bad name?

NJ has one of the best public education systems in the country. How exactly are we giving it a bad name?

Just because things are bad in Florida they should be bad everywhere? Have you heard the term race to the bottom? Besides look how well treating teachers is working for their education system. By almost every measure Florida isn't even in the top half.
I think the point was that people look at salaries elsewhere and assume that's what it's like everywhere and then they look around (as the OP was doing) and see what that salary buys where they are and think that teachers in those states are over paid. If memory serves me correctly, PA requires subject matter experts in the classroom. They'd better pay well or they'll just lose them to industry. I've had more than one cold call from school districts in PA wanting me to come down and interview for chemistry/physics positions. Apparently, there is a shortage in those areas (My resume was in the Michigan job bank both times.).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Teaching
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:39 PM.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top