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Old 06-25-2010, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
83,394 posts, read 96,318,274 times
Reputation: 30066

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texasbound77 View Post
I'm confused where the OP and others are getting the idea that teachers all over the country are making this high salary (70,000 and up.) I have lived in Texas, Oklahoma, Kentucky, and Missouri, and am familiar with all the surrounding states as I have looked into teaching in many areas (husband's job moves around often), and have not found any salaries that exceed 47,000 (I have my bachelor's degree and four years teaching experience at the high school level). The districts that pay 47,000, the most desirable districts in Texas, are *extremely* competitive, and you can only get in with connections and usually a Master's degree (when there are even positions open - this summer has been awful in the teaching market, and schools are all on hiring freezes). I have not made more than 27,000 each year I have taught, and my friends in education in this are of the country all have similar salaries. So yes, with the exception of maybe a few districts in PA, teachers ARE incredibly underpaid, especially for the work they do (and I'm sorry, if you have *not* worked in education and have not been a teacher, you have NO IDEA what the job requirements entail). I stopped in at my local McDonalds on a fund-raising night and noticed the manager's salary (posted due to recent hiring) exceeded my 4 year Bachelor's degree and four years teaching experience salary. SAD.
That is a little hard to believe.

Teacher Salaries By State | Average Salaries For Teachers | Beginning Salaries For Teachers | Teacher Raises | TeacherPortal.com

Of the states you mentioned:

Kentucky: Starting salary: 30,619 Average sal: 45,592

Missouri: Starting. . . . : 29,281, Average 40,462

Oklahoma: Starting. . . . : 29,174, Average 38,772

Texas: Starting. . . . : 33,775, Average 41,774
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Old 06-25-2010, 01:45 PM
 
5 posts, read 10,239 times
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Considering my family and friends are in this area of the country, we have chosen to stay. I know my response is not convenient to those who argue about how "overpaid" teachers are, but it is a fact that teachers in my area of the country (OK, MO, KS, KY, TN - even Texas, in some areas) are severely underpaid. I graduated with a 3.9 GPA from a highly academic private school, and yes, the public schools in the states where I live choose to pay their teachers less than or right at 30,000 dollars (at least at my level of experience). I know in OK, where I have taught the longest, salaries really never hit higher than the 50,000 level, and that would be for a veteran (20 years plus experience) teacher.

To the poster that suggested I leave teaching to become a manager at McDonalds: I had to laugh! All of my colleagues know that we are underpaid, but really, what are the alternatives? I think I will continue using my hard-earned degree and do what I love - teach. All teachers are selfish and in it for the "money" and the time off, right? Please. This is not the experience of ANYONE that I know. I recognize that things may be different in other areas of the country, but I hope those that seek to criticize teachers, even when they are not in the field of education at all, do the same. Here's hoping our government can come up with some solutions to pay ALL teachers around the country what they deserve.

And for what it's worth: I don't think I am any less of a quality teacher because I am paid less in OK than I would be in PA, NY, CA, etc. Of course, that is not a popular opinion either, right? Obviously, being born, raised, and gifted a full scholarship to a univ. in OK makes me far less of a teacher than if I had been born, certified, and paid more in PA, right? Right....
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Old 06-25-2010, 01:47 PM
 
5 posts, read 10,239 times
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Yes...like I said...starting out in OK: less than 30,000 dollars. I was paid 27,000 my first year. Sorry you find that hard to believe.
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Old 06-25-2010, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
83,394 posts, read 96,318,274 times
Reputation: 30066
I very carefully avoided saying I found your personal salary hard to believe. After all, you are the one who knows that information. However, I do find it hard to believe, given the salaries listed in the link, that you know no one making more than 47K/yr. The average salary in KY is almost that high, and averages tend to be distorted a bit by extremes, such as low starting salaries, more people at the lower end of the salary spectrum, etc.
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Old 06-25-2010, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,387 posts, read 29,052,330 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I very carefully avoided saying I found your personal salary hard to believe. After all, you are the one who knows that information. However, I do find it hard to believe, given the salaries listed in the link, that you know no one making more than 47K/yr. The average salary in KY is almost that high, and averages tend to be distorted a bit by extremes, such as low starting salaries, more people at the lower end of the salary spectrum, etc.
There are some high salaries for teachers and there are some low salaries for teachers. I know teachers who make upwards of $80,000 but they could make half again as much in industry so they are working for peanuts. If I get the job I'm interviewing for next week, I'll top at $85,000 in 13 years assuming I continue taking classes. I was making more than that in industry 4 years ago. It's relative.
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Old 06-25-2010, 03:50 PM
 
28,981 posts, read 32,829,431 times
Reputation: 10487
I know lots of teachers who topped at over 80K none of them could make 120k in private industry, none. Even the ones with science and math degrees. Why, at the point of experience they were making that much they had been teaching 25 plus years and didn't have the field experience. None of the English, Special Education, Art teachers could even make 80K with no field experience. Most in their fields don't make that much with field experience. They made choices many years ago and now have a life based on those choices. For some less income PERHAPS (assumes promotions etc) but they probably wouldn't be able to retire in their 50's with a pension and health care benefits. It is a trade off., Good luck on the job and if you get it folks need to remember in 13 years that not all teachers will be making as much as you. Then again if in 13 years you are making 85K how impressive will that be with 13 years of inflation?
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Old 06-25-2010, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Marion, IA
2,796 posts, read 5,279,225 times
Reputation: 1575
Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
I know lots of teachers who topped at over 80K none of them could make 120k in private industry, none. Even the ones with science and math degrees. Why, at the point of experience they were making that much they had been teaching 25 plus years and didn't have the field experience. None of the English, Special Education, Art teachers could even make 80K with no field experience. Most in their fields don't make that much with field experience. They made choices many years ago and now have a life based on those choices. For some less income PERHAPS (assumes promotions etc) but they probably wouldn't be able to retire in their 50's with a pension and health care benefits. It is a trade off., Good luck on the job and if you get it folks need to remember in 13 years that not all teachers will be making as much as you. Then again if in 13 years you are making 85K how impressive will that be with 13 years of inflation?
And what does that tell you?
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Old 06-25-2010, 04:15 PM
 
Location: St. Paul
198 posts, read 418,375 times
Reputation: 326
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texasbound77 View Post
To the poster that suggested I leave teaching to become a manager at McDonalds: I had to laugh! All of my colleagues know that we are underpaid, but really, what are the alternatives? I think I will continue using my hard-earned degree and do what I love - teach. All teachers are selfish and in it for the "money" and the time off, right? Please.
I did not say you were selfish and in it for the money. In fact, I explicitly said I thought you were very underpaid. Nor do I seriously think you should become a manager at McDonald's. But since you brought it up, it serves an illustrative point - why not do something else for awhile and let it be known that you aren't going to tolerate a salary of $27,000? Unless people vote with their feet, nothing will change.
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Old 06-25-2010, 04:58 PM
 
28,981 posts, read 32,829,431 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zz4guy View Post
And what does that tell you?
What did I write that wasn't clear. Ok I will translate for you.

It tells me that it is difficult to change careers in your mid 50's/60's and go into a related field without specific field experiences equal your years of teaching. It is like that for any field. Geez folks in their 50's and 60"s are having enough trouble finding jobs in their chosen career. What does that tell you? Also pay by field varies when compared with private industry. Thus there is a career path called teacher for those staying with it. Is that surprising? Now had those people gone into the private sector right out of college they would have gotten training for that specific field and would now have field experience there. If they decided to change fields at 60 and go into teaching how much do you think they would make? Hmmmm not as much as the 35 year veteran teacher. Perhaps the same as a first year teacher. Not rocket science seems clear. Is my post suppose to be some startling revelation? It also says that with inflation current entry and top salaries will probably increase. Nothing ground breaking there.
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Old 06-25-2010, 05:00 PM
 
28,981 posts, read 32,829,431 times
Reputation: 10487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I very carefully avoided saying I found your personal salary hard to believe. After all, you are the one who knows that information. However, I do find it hard to believe, given the salaries listed in the link, that you know no one making more than 47K/yr. The average salary in KY is almost that high, and averages tend to be distorted a bit by extremes, such as low starting salaries, more people at the lower end of the salary spectrum, etc.
He didn't say people weren't just that he didn't know them. The easiest thing is for him to post the salary schedule from his district or another district that tops out in the 40's.
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