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Old 08-29-2009, 12:35 PM
 
521 posts, read 1,217,352 times
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I got my RN degree 4 years ago in a suburban area that was saturated with nurses. For jobs I pretty much had to take what I could get but that was my choice in order to live in this locale. However I decided I really wanted to work in a ICU but knew without experience it would be very competitive, quite time consuming and perhaps not possible to get hired with the area hospitals. I figured out I would need to relocate. I did and i got hired on the spot in a rural hospital in a neighboring state.

No the pay is not as much as I would make in a large hospital but I am working in the type of job i really wanted to be in all along and I have gained valuable experience.

I don't think the OP should be complaining about not finding a job if she is not willing to relocate.
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Old 08-29-2009, 12:52 PM
 
2,180 posts, read 3,172,144 times
Reputation: 838
Quote:
Originally Posted by JS1 View Post
Nothing against career teachers, but there is another point of view available and I was happy to provide... free of charge.
Plenty of chances for that, I am sure, especially with your new job that I anticipate has far less 'homework' for you to do. I'm sure you can find an inner city enrichment or tutoring program near you that would love to have a man of your experience and perspective helping out!

Quote:
Originally Posted by JS1 View Post
I realize that while that alone does not entitle me to a teaching job, I just don't understand why schools don't take things like that into consideration when it comes to hiring. I have zero experience as a classroom teacher but I have 12 years experience using math in the real world. Apparently that doesn't matter. OK.
They do take those things into consideration. It matters.

That does not mean that it is enough.
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Old 08-29-2009, 12:56 PM
 
2,180 posts, read 3,172,144 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rya700 View Post
I don't think the OP should be complaining about not finding a job if she is not willing to relocate.
I'm not sure that's totally fair, either.

While I don't agree with many of the OP's perspectives on the job, job market, or employment issues, I think the urge to avoid either uprooting or abandoning family is totally legitimate.

I love teaching, but during the years when I could not find work in my field, I worked in high tech while teaching in volunteer spots, rather than seeking work that would force my wife to leave her family.
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Old 08-29-2009, 02:09 PM
 
29,359 posts, read 33,435,114 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JS1 View Post
EXACTLY! I have 12 years experience using math in the real world. The most common question asked in a non-honors course is "when am I ever going to use this?", and I was able to relate to that during my week at Trimble Tech High School, which the teachers of record were unable to do because they are career teachers.

Nothing against career teachers, but there is another point of view available and I was happy to provide... free of charge.

I realize that while that alone does not entitle me to a teaching job, I just don't understand why schools don't take things like that into consideration when it comes to hiring. I have zero experience as a classroom teacher but I have 12 years experience using math in the real world. Apparently that doesn't matter. OK.
If fully certified that can be a big plus. However if not it is a big negative because of NCLB requirements to have certified teachers. Often the biggest negative for teaching candidates is not their resume or portfolio but their personality. Especially at the building level the interviewers are trying to measure personality and how it will play out with:
Teachers within the department
Teachers in the school
Students who are focused and on task
Students who are not focused and tend to not be on task
Parents

These things are not in any order of rank or importance however the last assessment is probably number one.

Am I as the building level administrator going to consider them to be a significant asset or a pain in the asset.

Folks who share their issues in public forums are often of the sort who would share their controversy and upset and spread it to others in the school and community. Right or wrong, true or false, do you really want that to be the reason you might not get hired?
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Old 08-29-2009, 02:22 PM
 
29,359 posts, read 33,435,114 times
Reputation: 10983
Quote:
Originally Posted by JS1 View Post
I'm perplexed. Why would a school, of all places, expect someone to disobey the instructions prominently displayed on their website?

If a student flagrantly violates the principal's rules, he gets tossed into suspension. But teaching applicants are supposed to do the opposite, making them and the principal a bunch of hypocrites starting August 24?

I don't doubt what you are saying, I'm just saying that the system makes absolutely no sense.

I went to a seminar by an HR rep who said that if you are certified to teach math, you can pretty much just leave the seminar now because you don't need his advice on how to get a teaching job. I stuck around anyway but relied on his advice that you don't need to sneak around the rules and brownnose the principle. How wrong I was.

On the bright side, my business job is the best job I have ever had, so I'm staying. I don't want to hear schools whining "we're desperate for math teachers" because it only means that they are so full of bull crap it's coming out their nose. If I hear that again, I may have to write a letter to the editor to straighten them out.

p.s. I was told by a career counselor that the way to get a job in the business world is networking, that applying on-line rarely results in a job. Yet the job I got was from applying on their web site. I tried to network the best I could but I don't know a lot of people. A company representative contacted me, arranged an interview, and two months from uploading my resume, I got my company badge. Hmmmmm....
The issue is ego and power. In most districts the school Principal has the final say in hiring with Human Resources screening candidates and sending he best candidates out based on the perspective of the HR person who may have had limited school based experience and VERY LITTLE IF ANY school based administrative experience. What each considers to be desirable is often not the same. HR wants the people they want to get jobs to get them and Principals have a different set of criteria which is based on their on the ground assessment of their needs and the personality of their community and staff. It can be a real tug of war and H.R. hates having Principals go around them. However when it comes right down to it the Principal usually wins almost all of the battles. Why does the Principal win you might wonder? Well when the do do hits the fan and the teacher is a problem if they were hired over the objection of the Principal, H.R. will be minus a person. If H.R. sent the person out they should have done a better job screening. If the person met first with the principal and then was screened it is still in the lap of H.R. for the screening unless they noted the hiring was against their recommendation in the file.
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Old 08-29-2009, 02:29 PM
 
29,359 posts, read 33,435,114 times
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Remember most discussions of teacher shortages are big picture discussions and not individual districts or schools. It varies from state to state, district to distric and school to school. A state may only have 3 certified applicants for every five vacancies but some districts may have five applicants for every 3 vacancies. Also their are differences school to school within those districts. You have resignations occuring during the summer and some vacancies open up close to the start of the school year. School districts have their top applicants and until they are hired and off the market the next tier below them might be waiting to be hired etc etc etc. Eventually you reach the end of the summer. Some great candidates may still be available in early August as they were waiting for their dream job to come through and it didn't. It is all one big chess match.
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Old 08-29-2009, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,476 posts, read 16,886,374 times
Reputation: 4304
I have not read the comments, but you do realize that Texas like almost every other state has budget shortfalls right now?

The states in general are not hiring much unless its absolutely essential. You'd likely have much better luck if you applied when your states finances were in better shape.

Regardless, given how easily you took a job in the private sector its probably good that you are going that direction. You're likely to make more money too.
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Old 08-29-2009, 10:59 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,311 times
Reputation: 10
It seems that nepotism is a universial problem for most Countries, but i think the nepotism is more serious in country.
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Old 08-30-2009, 06:14 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,391 posts, read 29,501,513 times
Reputation: 14480
Why is it when a teacher complains about wages, it's assumed they are not dedicated? Are only people willing to go broke teaching dedicated teachers?

Count me among those who want to teach but are not willing to go broke doing it. I have way too much going for me to do that.

Some of us heard the call when they said there was a teacher shortage. The bad assumption we made was that we'd be able to find jobs that would, eventually, lead us to the average wages posted for our state. Those of you judging us have no idea the dissapointment we go through when we find that the only jobs are in low paying charter schools that start you out 25% below districts and NEVER give raises. I hired in at 25% below what I could get as a first year teacher in a district and have no hope of ever making more. I have no retirement plan. I have lousy benefits. Why does complaining about that make me an undedicated teacher? Why should I accept this for my family? Would you accept it for yours?

Whether I stay in teaching or not depends on whether or not I can find a decent paying job. Because of the issue with my certs, I doubt I will. No one warned me that districts prefer the lesser integrated science cert because holders can teach anything 6th - 12th grade whereas I'm single subject and can teach 10th - 12th grades but not 6th -9th. Yeah, I'm ticked off. I feel mislead. Had I known I wouldn't be able to make a living teaching, I wouldn't have gone into the profession. Why does that make me undedicated as a teacher? No matter what we do for a living, being able to make a living at it is kind of necessary to stay in the profession.

If by chance I had landed a job in a district out of the gate, I'd be happily working my way towards tenure and no one would question whether or not I'm dedicated but because I landed somewhere with no financial future and think that's a crock, I'm not dedicated?
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Old 08-30-2009, 11:01 AM
 
2,180 posts, read 3,172,144 times
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What we say is not dedicated are not the people who cannot find jobs or need a living wage, but the folks who say "I couldn't find a job during the three months I was searching before I had finished my certification, so I am going to blow off the entire profession forever, take that, you!"

Why?

Because, based on the information that has been presented, that seems to be the case.
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