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Old 12-19-2009, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,659,751 times
Reputation: 14495

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hypocore View Post
I agree with you on the first part. I think what you want to offer for teaching isn't what's needed in the schools.

On the second, your definition of cheapest seems to the person with the lowest education level and that's not my definition at all.

As a I said here, it doesn't matter where you come from or how long you've taught, you will start at the same starting pay as any other teacher who is new to any particular school district. Our area districts start teachers around $47,000 and that's where you would start. If you had a Master's then it would bump up to only around $48,500. Period.

The only areas for varying that pay is for stipends for extra assignments such as coaching, trainers, certain sponsors, or fine arts.

So anyone with a BS would come out with the exact same starting pay no matter how they came about getting that teaching certification, what grades they made, where they went to school or how long they've been teaching. There is no 'cheapest'.
Here, union rules set wages. Before you tenure, they can set your wage at whatever they want but once you tenure, you get credit for your years and all of your education. So cheapest does mean least education.

Some districts start masters level teachers at masters level pay, others do not. If they do, they are encouraged to hire the BS over the MS. My school has a reputation for replacing MS level teachers with BS level teachers because BS to MS is the only raise you ever get and they can save $2000 a year by replacing an MS teacher with a BS teacher. I'm sure I'll be replaced just as soon as they have someone with a BS who can teach both chemistry and physics. That's the way it goes around here.

Because I teach in a charter, I'm not covered by a union and I will not ever receive credit for the years I taught in charter schools. We also don't get a state teacher's pension. We have no retirement plan other than what we save on our own. Charter positions are pretty bad pay and benefits wise. Even bachelors level one, in a district, is more than I'll ever make working for a charter.
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Old 12-19-2009, 06:01 PM
 
2,920 posts, read 2,901,211 times
Reputation: 3504
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivorytickler View Post
Here, union rules set wages. Before you tenure, they can set your wage at whatever they want but once you tenure, you get credit for your years and all of your education. So cheapest does mean least education.

Some districts start masters level teachers at masters level pay, others do not. If they do, they are encouraged to hire the BS over the MS. My school has a reputation for replacing MS level teachers with BS level teachers because BS to MS is the only raise you ever get and they can save $2000 a year by replacing an MS teacher with a BS teacher. I'm sure I'll be replaced just as soon as they have someone with a BS who can teach both chemistry and physics. That's the way it goes around here.

Because I teach in a charter, I'm not covered by a union and I will not ever receive credit for the years I taught in charter schools. We also don't get a state teacher's pension. We have no retirement plan other than what we save on our own. Charter positions are pretty bad pay and benefits wise. Even bachelors level one, in a district, is more than I'll ever make working for a charter.
Why don't you join a union so that you can take advantage of the "it's not what you know, it's who you know" situation?
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Old 12-19-2009, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,659,751 times
Reputation: 14495
Quote:
Originally Posted by lhpartridge View Post
Why don't you join a union so that you can take advantage of the "it's not what you know, it's who you know" situation?
Because you have to get a job in a union district to get in a union. You can't just join a union. You have to get a job somewhere that has a union. If I had the job I wouldn't need the union. Catch 22.

While I dislike unions, I understand why they exist. The disparity between wages in union districts and charters is shocking. Someone in the district I live in with my credentials would top out at $65K in 15 years, have decent benefits and a pension. I was topped out for my charter on day one at $32K, have lousy benefits and no pension. There are no raises at my school.
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