U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Teaching
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-15-2010, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Leaving fabulous Las Vegas, Nevada
3,835 posts, read 6,595,033 times
Reputation: 7254

Advertisements

Senator Tom Harkin, an Iowa Democrat, wants to create a $23 billion jobs fund to prevent teachers in the U.S. from being fired because of budget shortfalls.

Senator Harkin Proposes $23 Billion Fund to Save Teacher Jobs - BusinessWeek

This might really help some states that are hurting. What do you think?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-15-2010, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Central FL
1,382 posts, read 3,154,002 times
Reputation: 1180
I would be for it. You can think of it as preventing extremely overcrowded classrooms. Most people don't seem to care if teachers lose their jobs or not, but at some point, parents will notice when their child is lost in a sea of 34 other kindergarteners in a classroom. Ditto for a high school science class of 35 kids trying to do hands on experiments. Forget it. My sister in law teaches science in NJ and she says it's not really safe above 17 students for most labs. I laugh about that because she is so fortunate that she still has a pretty good situation there.

The budget situation for most states is a lot worse than anyone thought it would be. Revenues continue to sink. Thousands of teaching jobs have already been lost. My district cut over 100 last year (most in special ed) and we have another 65 classroom teachers who will be displaced in May. It really is too late for this bill because districts have already approved cuts for the 2010-2011 school year. I guess teachers are just expected to be laid off, sit around praying for a job, and then be rehired at the last minute for next school year.

I think education is a worthly spending category for our country. In my state of Georgia, lawmakers are considering cutting a full week from the student school year to save money. That means kids will just sit home when they should be in school and learning! That is outrageous. Teachers here face up to a 15% pay cut (10 more furlough days and a local pay cut) on top of huge cuts & 6 furlough days last year.

There seems to be a huge disconnect between Main Street and Washington these days about just how dire things are in many states. Kindergarten programs are being cut in NJ. Phoenix has been hit hard. FL proposes to cut funding from the state pre-K program. GA wants to keep kids home for a full week. Metro Atlanta counties will cut hundreds of teachers on May 28. These are just a few examples that I can think of right off the bat.

Last edited by MovedfromFL; 04-15-2010 at 12:03 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2010, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Washington, DC
605 posts, read 1,919,743 times
Reputation: 377
This is excellent news. I hope that Sen. Harkin can get political buy-in on this initiative.

It is the height of undemocracy to tie school funding to local taxes. Even in times of prosperity, the differences between well-funded and underfunded schools are staggering.

An interesting quote on the matter from The Forum for Education and Democracy's 2008 article "Democracy at Risk":

Federal initiative has made a major difference in both school quality and access in the past. Education legislation in the 1950s and ’60s led to an era of substantial improvement in schools and gains in equity. By the mid-1970s, achievement had improved, college-going rates for African American and Hispanic students were equivalent to those for white students, and teacher shortages had been nearly eliminated. The United States led the world in education.

However, many of these initiatives were ended in the 1980s and the gains lost when the federal share of education spending was sharply cut in half. Although modest progress was made in the 1990s, other countries have surged ahead with strategic investments in systems that promote top-flight teaching for higher-order skills in every school.

I know that the populist cry right now is to cut government spending, but I see so many strong arguments for increased federal funding for schools.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2010, 12:56 PM
 
Location: On a Slow-Sinking Granite Rock Up North
3,637 posts, read 5,257,159 times
Reputation: 2650
Quote:
Originally Posted by photobuff42 View Post
Senator Tom Harkin, an Iowa Democrat, wants to create a $23 billion jobs fund to prevent teachers in the U.S. from being fired because of budget shortfalls.

Senator Harkin Proposes $23 Billion Fund to Save Teacher Jobs - BusinessWeek

This might really help some states that are hurting. What do you think?

Okay, I see the point of it, but I question where is the money going to come from?

States are indeed hurting. That's because people are hurting and revenue is lacking. Where does the federal government get their money?

Yes, I know - it's a rhetorical question. We pay taxes and borrow it from other countries.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2010, 01:00 PM
 
4,047 posts, read 4,369,977 times
Reputation: 1321
I don't know why so many people just don't get that investing in education is a better investment for the country than anything else.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2010, 05:16 PM
 
1,650 posts, read 3,361,216 times
Reputation: 1121
Quote:
Originally Posted by reloop View Post
Okay, I see the point of it, but I question where is the money going to come from?

States are indeed hurting. That's because people are hurting and revenue is lacking. Where does the federal government get their money?

Yes, I know - it's a rhetorical question. We pay taxes and borrow it from other countries.
It would be a good idea if we didn't have to borrow the money or raise taxes to pay for it. The stimulus was supposed to prevent teachers from losing their jobs. It was passed last year. Even with the stimulus, myself and 10 of my coworkers all lost their jobs.

I can see some schools wasting the extra money instead of using it to save teachers' jobs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2010, 01:09 AM
 
2,693 posts, read 3,739,584 times
Reputation: 2840
Typical politician of the tax-and-spend school.

Let's see, at an annual salary of $50,000 each, Harkin's $23 billion could support 460,000 teachers for one year. That would take a large burden off the taxpayers in those states. But wait; which other taxpayers are being taxed to take the burden off those taxpayers??

Silly....stupid....idiotic....ridiculous.....any other adjectives we can use??

Of course, a large part of that $23 billion would be swallowed up in administrator salaries, pension payments, retirement benefits, perks, diversity consultants, and etc. Thus, perhaps, only around 37 teachers would be employed for that year.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2010, 09:50 AM
 
Location: On a Slow-Sinking Granite Rock Up North
3,637 posts, read 5,257,159 times
Reputation: 2650
Quote:
Originally Posted by LogicIsYourFriend View Post
I don't know why so many people just don't get that investing in education is a better investment for the country than anything else.

Nothing would make me happier than to invest heavily in education, but I just happen to realistically know that one can't fund anything without money.

IMHO, one can "spin" the economy however positively they want, but whether we truly want to believe it or not, we're broke.

Until such a time that we can dig ourselves out (which I'm sure will happen eventually due to necessity) there is no funding IMO. We have to learn to work with what we have.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2010, 09:52 AM
 
Location: On a Slow-Sinking Granite Rock Up North
3,637 posts, read 5,257,159 times
Reputation: 2650
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebelt1234 View Post
It would be a good idea if we didn't have to borrow the money or raise taxes to pay for it. The stimulus was supposed to prevent teachers from losing their jobs. It was passed last year. Even with the stimulus, myself and 10 of my coworkers all lost their jobs.

I can see some schools wasting the extra money instead of using it to save teachers' jobs.
I agree.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2010, 01:08 PM
 
1,946 posts, read 4,627,357 times
Reputation: 852
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebelt1234 View Post
It would be a good idea if we didn't have to borrow the money or raise taxes to pay for it. The stimulus was supposed to prevent teachers from losing their jobs. It was passed last year. Even with the stimulus, myself and 10 of my coworkers all lost their jobs.

I can see some schools wasting the extra money instead of using it to save teachers' jobs.
Yep, which is exactly why I take propositions like this with a grain of salt.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education > Teaching
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top