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Old 01-14-2011, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, Tennessee
22,533 posts, read 46,075,513 times
Reputation: 13302

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I'm finding the Knoxville information a little hard to believe. I worked for Comcast for three years and a good portion of the city has high-speed internet service. I've also worked for BellSouth, doing tech support for all of their southern customers. Something just doesn't add up for me. I've seen many more areas with less internet access.

First of all, I'm 49 and own two desk-top computers, one laptop, a Sony Bravia HDTV with 1080p and 120hz, 3 HD-DVRs, we have 3 Blackberrys, and Facebook pages, including a business one. I've been on the internet since 1990 with Prodigy.

Also, we use to live out in Knox County in a very rural area and we had high-speed broadband. Where I live now we can choose between Comcast, Knology and U-Verse and most of the city has Docsis 3.0.

BornTooLate, I truly hope you were kidding with your post. I haven't seen a flip phone in years and as my name indicates I certainly know how to download music. If you truly thought that Tennesseeans are this backward I suggest that you expand your horizons and educate yourself. Smartphones considered geeky? Surely you jest, otherwise your ignorance is showing.
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Old 01-14-2011, 10:06 PM
 
2,063 posts, read 6,242,715 times
Reputation: 2712
Quote:
Originally Posted by Borntoolate85 View Post
Another thing to keep in mind, not just for a career point of view: Here in the DC area, it seems like every other person on the street is holding some mobile device. That's considered "tech savy". Almost everyone has their Facebook page as well. Yes, the gap in terms of "how far behind the times" I suspect in TN way be waning, but I have a hunch that is definately still there. For instance, I perceive that people in TN mainly just have flipphones and still listen to CDs, with MP3s and Smartphones considered "geeky" down there. Many probably still don't have an HDTV as well. Many probably have just basic cable and dial-up Internet, but is that just a myth? Volunteers, give us your thoughts!

If you stopped watching TV for a little while you might find out us backwoods folks actually have Apple stores and know about apps and i-phones and blackberries, and all the other trendoid stuff that matters to those who need to be at the bleeding edge as much as the uber-trendy of DC. Do you really believe the Verizon store here carries "flip phones" just for the backward folk? You need to get over yourself and actually get out in the real world a bit instead of living in your little fantasy world.
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Old 01-15-2011, 06:26 AM
 
Location: Nashville
597 posts, read 1,838,149 times
Reputation: 664
Hey, hold on a minute. I have a flip phone and have for years. Each time I think I might need to jump on the bandwagon with a smart phone I ask myself if that's something I actually need to commit hundreds of dollars a year for. So far, no. My purpose in having a phone is to make phone calls if I need to. Try calling me when I'm out; you won't get me; it's not on. It's a safety net for me and that's all I need.

I use sophisticated design software daily in my work, am never far from a computer with high-speed connectivity, but on the other hand I still get a newspaper in my drive each morning (and supplement, of course, with websites). I live in this world as a man approaching 60 not too far down the road and am well aware of the things available to me and am more than capable of taking advantage of the things I need. But, being convinced by marketing that my life is somehow incomplete by not buying all the toys is something I'm rather proud of. My lifeline to the outside world is around $6 per month. That allows me the luxury of having a new car with no car note, a nearly paid off mortgage, money in the bank. Not to mention an appreciation for the world around me.

My hobby is my landscapes and all that that entails. Just this morning I was out in my yard watching the patterns of the northerly migration of the birds thinking that it truly won't be long until I can get back outside and create my own serenity in my own space. When I'm out, I look up, not at a 2-inch screen. My world is bigger than that. I'm very thankful to still find my surroundings interesting enough and myself smart enough to find my way without a device for assistance. Yes, I'm highly capable and know many highly capable people in this great state of Tennessee. Personally, I'm just not one to overlook my place on the planet and am able to see and feel things around me in a way many people seem to forget. I live my life and am happy about that. I know it makes me a better person.

I don't need an app for that.
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Old 01-15-2011, 08:04 AM
 
Location: somewhere over the rainbow Ohio
2,017 posts, read 4,697,156 times
Reputation: 1527
Whats a flip phone? Sorry, I just have the basic no frills model trac phone and I buy my minutes monthly. I use my cell to call cabs when I'm out, otherwise it is never used and I'm free from a contract that I have to pay an extravagent price per month. I no longer use credit cards, no longer have a car note and rent by choice. In other words I live within my means and I don't miss the burdan of drowning in debt.
Although you tend to think Tennesseans are backwards, your ignorance places you well below the ones you think you are so much better then. Oh yeah, I still listen to CD's and I'm old enough to have had a collection of 8 tracks at one time. I'm also a transplant from NY and I can guarantee Knoxville, Tn. is way more with the times then where I was from.
Pam

Last edited by Pam& Bill; 01-15-2011 at 08:09 AM.. Reason: Added thoughts. P
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Old 01-15-2011, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, Tennessee
22,533 posts, read 46,075,513 times
Reputation: 13302
Some people truly need a smartphone for their business or career. Some people don't need it at all. There is nothing wrong with either scenario. However, just because someone uses technology to earn a living - or even for fun - it does not make them less of a humanist or naturist. I see plenty of kayaking, skiing, gardening, hiking photos on Facebook.

And speaking of which, the internet, if used in a certain way, can bring people closer together. In the past year I have seen plenty of people find long-lost friends and family members. It has happened to me as well.

In fact, use of this forum is often an act of reaching out to others in a useful way.
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Old 01-15-2011, 06:16 PM
 
Location: Nashville
597 posts, read 1,838,149 times
Reputation: 664
hiknapster, you summed it up beautifully. You said the things I'd wished I'd added to my first post, but said it much better than I could. Cheers.
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Old 01-15-2011, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Nashville
597 posts, read 1,838,149 times
Reputation: 664
This has all given me a chance to think back to times long before today's technology gave itself to the world. So, I'm in a trance right now about it all. Highlights of my trip down memory lane include my first computer chat sometime around 1984, then came the TI on which I'd write 2000 lines of code so it would play music and scroll type...until I turned it off and it all disappeared. I had no cassette at the time for memory (and a 19 inch b/w TV as a monitor). My first real IBM PC in 88. I remember my typesetting business with two typesetting machines with no WYSIWYG screens, only scrolling code, photo setting on film and stinky chemical processing prior to paste up. A side note, those machines cost $25,000 each and each font family (reg, reg ital, bold and bold ital) set me back $400 EACH! They used 8-inch floppy disks capable of holding 327k of information, maintenance contract was $4500 a year, paper and chemicals were outrageous and if you needed service (no matter how small) without the m-contract, the minimum charge was $400. Okay, now I'm about to faint thinking about it. But alas, as time went by, the machines ended up in my backyard with ivy growing on them and the 60 font strips and cards (remember, $400 each) ended up in the garbage.

That was all replaced with my first Mac. All 30mb of hard drive space and 5mb of RAM and a 14" color monitor. That little prince of machine (turtles are faster) with the $1400 HP black and white printer set me back almost $4000. I'm going to faint again.

I had friends on AOL whose account numbers were 3-digits long. For you Facebook folks that's like knowing numbers 2231 and 4543 out of 500 million.

I'm not even going into how "uptown" I felt with the 2400 bps modem (I even ordered a pizza). Of course I could have ground the flour and made it myself faster.

Then, blah, blah blah...it's all so distant now. Everything is fast, everything is fancy, home and office. The little machine I'm on right now could run Tunisia (and hopefully do a better job) and my work computer does calculations and things I can't even fathom, and I totally take them for granted.

I think that although I rely on sophisticated software to live my life and do my job, I'm really, really glad that I lived through much of the development of what actually became our extra hands, ears and eyes. I wouldn't ever want to go back (I did love my electric typewriter though). Not being able to know where these things came from and thinking it's cool to think of some of us as backward old farts is simply just another reason to smile at entry number one on this thread.

I just can't help but grin when I think that my first stab at ad design was a propped up door in a warehouse for a "drafting table", a box cutter for an Exacto blade and a bottle of glue for paste-up (I was an English and Business major; I had NO IDEA what I was doing). Now, with the pushing of the right buttons, enormous files fly off my desk into some heavy hitting corporate offices and end up in millions of copies of various print and electronic media. But I'm still the goof ball, sitting in a chair, doing my job (and looking at C-D) at the same time.

Sorry about that, folks, it's made me feel good to think back. Hope you don't mind my sharing a little.

Dave
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Old 01-16-2011, 01:25 AM
 
Location: Knoxville, Tennessee
22,533 posts, read 46,075,513 times
Reputation: 13302
IngleDave, you and I must be about the same age. I remember my ex-husband begging for a Commodore 64 and then he taught himself to write code. Now he has a big job in Boston and he taught everything he knew to one of our sons who does alright for himself, too, as a network administrator.

But I remember playing games on the thing where you took one step north and one step west and you could find a treasure. Remember those great PC games? And then Leisure Suit Larry came along...

I started out as a newspaper reporter that either filed from home on a word processor and drove it in or filed at the office on a manual typewriter. We'd edit with a pen.

Then we got the IBMs and we used MS-DOS to write and send our stories. What a process! Sometimes it worked. Sometimes, not so much.

The first laptop I have was from the newspaper and it was enormous! It had a huge metal case and was very difficult to carry by yourself! And the first cellphones! They were almost as bad as the laptops! Remember the carrying cases they had?
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Old 01-16-2011, 05:19 AM
 
Location: Nashville
597 posts, read 1,838,149 times
Reputation: 664
Ha, I do. I didn't have one, but had a friend who did who'd carry his phone into a restaurant and it looked like small luggage. Let's not get into the video camcorders of the day where everyone at Disneyworld looked a part of a news crew. Poor dads.

But, one thing about it, the cost of today's goodies is remarkably CHEAP in comparison. To think so much became available to so many in such a short time is mind-boggling.

hiknapster, this must be like today's version of our grandparents' stories about trudging 9 miles to school through heavy snow, each way. We have it pretty good, don't we? Woo hoo.
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Old 01-16-2011, 07:24 AM
 
14,934 posts, read 26,640,695 times
Reputation: 18141
Please, this is not about personal stories; although they are very fun to read! We have a chat thread for that Back on topic of the OP. Thanks!
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