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Old 04-22-2011, 09:32 PM
 
Location: southwest TN
8,178 posts, read 14,260,960 times
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I'm looking for 2 related types of information:

The first, dog breeds that do well in the summer heat of south western TN and with the outdoors - farm country (south of Jackson). We will be surrounded by farms, next to, behind, and across from us and I am sure there will be chickens and other farm animals. I don't want trouble with my neighbors or want to worry that my dog escapes to go hunt on the neighbors' property. We also are surrounded by heavy woods, separating us from the neighbors, so there is always the possibility of snakes and other wildlife I need to concern myself with - both with the dog getting hurt by or chasing. While we will be taking in a rescued dog and I'll be getting a mutt, there are characteristics of breeds that will be predominant, so I'm just wondering what I should look for.

Then I'm looking for a trainer to work with me to turn this mutt into an assistance dog. I'm severely hearing impaired with my aids and deaf without them. I've owned dogs most of my life so I'm not unfamiliar with basic training but we're going to need to go a step further and I don't have those skills. Is there a group that trains hearing ear dogs or someone who could teach me how?


So, I know some of this is pet related, but I'm more concerned with the heat and local training issues.
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Old 04-25-2011, 06:58 AM
 
Location: Whiteville Tennessee
8,262 posts, read 15,969,001 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Annie View Post
I'm looking for 2 related types of information:

The first, dog breeds that do well in the summer heat of south western TN and with the outdoors - farm country (south of Jackson). We will be surrounded by farms, next to, behind, and across from us and I am sure there will be chickens and other farm animals. I don't want trouble with my neighbors or want to worry that my dog escapes to go hunt on the neighbors' property. We also are surrounded by heavy woods, separating us from the neighbors, so there is always the possibility of snakes and other wildlife I need to concern myself with - both with the dog getting hurt by or chasing. While we will be taking in a rescued dog and I'll be getting a mutt, there are characteristics of breeds that will be predominant, so I'm just wondering what I should look for.

Then I'm looking for a trainer to work with me to turn this mutt into an assistance dog. I'm severely hearing impaired with my aids and deaf without them. I've owned dogs most of my life so I'm not unfamiliar with basic training but we're going to need to go a step further and I don't have those skills. Is there a group that trains hearing ear dogs or someone who could teach me how?


So, I know some of this is pet related, but I'm more concerned with the heat and local training issues.
Hi Annie! Maybe Jackson School for the Deaf could give you some info on assistance dogs.
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Old 04-26-2011, 12:20 AM
 
Location: southwest TN
8,178 posts, read 14,260,960 times
Reputation: 14779
Well, dang it all, Capt, I didn't know there was a school for the deaf in Jackson. I know that the JCIL is very active and I was/am planning to take some ASL classes soon as I gets me down there, assuming my house hasn't floated away or been sucked into a tornado! I was all set to contact someone in Selmer about becoming a volunteer when we found out we were being delayed in our move.

I'm really getting anxious.

Do you know anyone specific to contact at the school, Capt?
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Old 04-28-2011, 06:03 AM
 
Location: Mountains of middle TN
5,232 posts, read 13,559,938 times
Reputation: 6011
Keep your dog indoors, please! If you're outside and have no fence put them on a leash. Then you don't need to worry about the breed. No breed of dog will enjoy the heat and humidity anymore than a human wearing a fur coat would. Temps can top 100 degrees. Would you want to be in that?

As for a dog that can handle it on walks and such, avoid any of the brachycephalic breeds. They are the ones that look like they've been chasing parked cars; pugs, English bull dogs, Boston Terrier, Boxer, etc. Labs are the most common breed of dog for use as a civilian therapy dog. If you do that route, make sure you have either TONS of experience in raising a dog or you get an adult. Labs don't usually settle down to a normal activity level until they're about 13 years old. Ok, maybe not that old, but you get the idea. They're VERY high drive, high work, high energy dogs, so if you're not crazy athletic and going for MANY walks daily, hiking, and plan on spending a lot of time training a dog, they may not be perfect for you. And keep in mind Goldens fall into the Lab category - they're both retreivers - as are Chessies and such.

Rotties are known for their desire to do anything to please their handler. A friend of mine has raised some of the top show rotties for decades and had one as her assistance dog when she got older. On a walk on her property she fell and broke her ankle. Her dog immediately positioned itself under her and allowed her use to it for weight bearing and leverage to get up and back to the house. The only problem is you'll have to deal with BSL. For that reason I'd suggest and also warn about using shepherds and the bully breeds. Both amazing breeds of dogs, totally dedicated to their handler, very intelligent and have excellent temperaments but BSL is always an issue.

If you don't mind a crazy amount of fur and slobber, a Great Pyrenees would be good. They really should be kept indoors because of all that fur, but they were bred to be livestock guardians. If they were to escape they'd be less likely to bother livestock in the area. On the other hand, because they were bred to guard livestock they're not as likely to be bonded to humans either. Shaving them solves the hair problem and though they were bred to be outdoors, they LOVE being in the house. I've got a friend that has seven of them in her home. Keep in mind these dogs easily reach and can exceed 120 pounds each.

Newfoundlands and Standard Schnauzers are large breeds that seldom have any BSL. Both are very intelligent and have great temperaments. If you're looking for a large breed they may be a good option. If you're only looking for a small or medium size breed, your choices are enormous! If you're not experienced with raising a puppy, or don't have much training under your belt, avoid terriers. They tend to be much more high drive than other breeds and are very stubborn and can challenge a new owner. I've been training dogs 17 years and most of the issues I see in little dogs are terriers.

Beagles are wonderful smaller size dogs. Not really known for their intelligence, but they can be trained. They've got fantastic little personalities. You'd have to be very careful that they only go out on a leash though as they were bred for hunting so could be an issue if they get loose. I've got a friend that has three of them and they're always bringing home a dead animal of some kind.

The Schnauzer comes in a smaller size too, so that's an option. They have the fewest number of genetically passed diseases and medical problems of the dogs I've worked with. Very strong, healthy little things with great temperaments and wonderful, clown like personalities. They do require grooming and if you're not really good with clippers, you'll have to take them in to a groomer every four to six weeks. Depending on the area you're in, it could run up to $75 or so for each grooming. Just an expense to keep in mind. But they're very easy to train, very intelligent, and bond very closely to their handler. They're really a great little breed, and seldom do you see them on a BSL list.

ETA: Hubby wanted to add BSL = Breed Specific Legislation. He didn't know what it was when he met me so he wanted me to make sure I included the info!
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Old 04-28-2011, 05:03 PM
 
24 posts, read 32,567 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrs1885 View Post
Keep your dog indoors, please! If you're outside and have no fence put them on a leash. Then you don't need to worry about the breed. No breed of dog will enjoy the heat and humidity anymore than a human wearing a fur coat would. Temps can top 100 degrees. Would you want to be in that?

As for a dog that can handle it on walks and such, avoid any of the brachycephalic breeds. They are the ones that look like they've been chasing parked cars; pugs, English bull dogs, Boston Terrier, Boxer, etc. Labs are the most common breed of dog for use as a civilian therapy dog. If you do that route, make sure you have either TONS of experience in raising a dog or you get an adult. Labs don't usually settle down to a normal activity level until they're about 13 years old. Ok, maybe not that old, but you get the idea. They're VERY high drive, high work, high energy dogs, so if you're not crazy athletic and going for MANY walks daily, hiking, and plan on spending a lot of time training a dog, they may not be perfect for you. And keep in mind Goldens fall into the Lab category - they're both retreivers - as are Chessies and such.

Rotties are known for their desire to do anything to please their handler. A friend of mine has raised some of the top show rotties for decades and had one as her assistance dog when she got older. On a walk on her property she fell and broke her ankle. Her dog immediately positioned itself under her and allowed her use to it for weight bearing and leverage to get up and back to the house. The only problem is you'll have to deal with BSL. For that reason I'd suggest and also warn about using shepherds and the bully breeds. Both amazing breeds of dogs, totally dedicated to their handler, very intelligent and have excellent temperaments but BSL is always an issue.

If you don't mind a crazy amount of fur and slobber, a Great Pyrenees would be good. They really should be kept indoors because of all that fur, but they were bred to be livestock guardians. If they were to escape they'd be less likely to bother livestock in the area. On the other hand, because they were bred to guard livestock they're not as likely to be bonded to humans either. Shaving them solves the hair problem and though they were bred to be outdoors, they LOVE being in the house. I've got a friend that has seven of them in her home. Keep in mind these dogs easily reach and can exceed 120 pounds each.

Newfoundlands and Standard Schnauzers are large breeds that seldom have any BSL. Both are very intelligent and have great temperaments. If you're looking for a large breed they may be a good option. If you're only looking for a small or medium size breed, your choices are enormous! If you're not experienced with raising a puppy, or don't have much training under your belt, avoid terriers. They tend to be much more high drive than other breeds and are very stubborn and can challenge a new owner. I've been training dogs 17 years and most of the issues I see in little dogs are terriers.

Beagles are wonderful smaller size dogs. Not really known for their intelligence, but they can be trained. They've got fantastic little personalities. You'd have to be very careful that they only go out on a leash though as they were bred for hunting so could be an issue if they get loose. I've got a friend that has three of them and they're always bringing home a dead animal of some kind.

The Schnauzer comes in a smaller size too, so that's an option. They have the fewest number of genetically passed diseases and medical problems of the dogs I've worked with. Very strong, healthy little things with great temperaments and wonderful, clown like personalities. They do require grooming and if you're not really good with clippers, you'll have to take them in to a groomer every four to six weeks. Depending on the area you're in, it could run up to $75 or so for each grooming. Just an expense to keep in mind. But they're very easy to train, very intelligent, and bond very closely to their handler. They're really a great little breed, and seldom do you see them on a BSL list.

ETA: Hubby wanted to add BSL = Breed Specific Legislation. He didn't know what it was when he met me so he wanted me to make sure I included the info!


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Old 04-29-2011, 01:10 AM
 
942 posts, read 2,690,218 times
Reputation: 679
I doubt anyone at the tiny West Tennessee School for the Deaf (WTSD) campus would know. Tennessee Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (TCDHH) (JCIL is under TCDHH) and even United Way of West Tennessee are probably the best places around town for information.
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Old 04-29-2011, 08:14 AM
 
Location: southwest TN
8,178 posts, read 14,260,960 times
Reputation: 14779
Mrs, thanks for the info - pretty comprehensive. I actually have mostly ruled out labs and for the reason you state, although I might consider an older/rescue lab. I'm already into my 60s, so we are mostly looking at an older dog - at least not a young pup at any rate. I was leaning towards Dobie but he vetoed all dogs that people associate with being fierce, so out goes the rotties, pitties, weimeraners, and the rest of the "bullies". I don't want a shepherd - the one I raised from a puppy (his mother was my beagle/terrier) had hip dysplasia and I never want to go through that again, aside from the hair issue. I really don't want a huge dog and my arthritis will keep me from doing serious grooming.

I'm experienced in basic training and we have mostly perimeter trained my KITTEN (we're still in the early stages only 2 weeks) as I did with all my dogs, so off-leash and outdoors in my yard with us is what I will teach. You gave me lots of great info.

Do you know of rescue groups/organizations in McNairy Cty? That's where I'd start my search.
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Old 04-29-2011, 08:15 AM
 
Location: southwest TN
8,178 posts, read 14,260,960 times
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Brian, thanks for that info. Much appreciated.
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Old 04-29-2011, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Whiteville Tennessee
8,262 posts, read 15,969,001 times
Reputation: 10024
Ms. Annie you need a dog that can be trained to hunt only when told to do so. Thereby leaving the neighborhood critters alone. Think beagle or bassetthound.
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Old 04-29-2011, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Whiteville Tennessee
8,262 posts, read 15,969,001 times
Reputation: 10024
Jackson School for the Deaf
100 Berryhill Drive
Jackson,Tennessee 38301
731-423-5705
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