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Old 04-09-2012, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Kingsport, TN
1,697 posts, read 5,716,285 times
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Many of our magnificent forests will be permanently changed:

Only a small portion of the state’s hemlocks — many that are hundreds of years old and stand 10 stories or higher — are expected to survive a scourge of tiny insects that has advanced here from the Northeast.

Chemical treatments are needed one tree at a time, and there’s only so much money and time available.

Many of the long-lived evergreens already have died or are dying in Great Smoky Mountains National Park and elsewhere, leaving needleless gray hulks that no longer shade creeks and threaten to fall on whatever is nearby.

Mighty hemlocks falling to tiny, hungry insects | The Tennessean | tennessean.com
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Old 04-09-2012, 04:36 PM
 
Location: IN
20,170 posts, read 34,488,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kamoshika View Post
Many of our magnificent forests will be permanently changed:

Only a small portion of the state’s hemlocks — many that are hundreds of years old and stand 10 stories or higher — are expected to survive a scourge of tiny insects that has advanced here from the Northeast.

Chemical treatments are needed one tree at a time, and there’s only so much money and time available.

Many of the long-lived evergreens already have died or are dying in Great Smoky Mountains National Park and elsewhere, leaving needleless gray hulks that no longer shade creeks and threaten to fall on whatever is nearby.

Mighty hemlocks falling to tiny, hungry insects | The Tennessean | tennessean.com
Yes, it is horrible to see The only thing that stops the rapid march of the adelgid is very frigid winter temperatures, which the southern Appalachians doesn't see much of at all.
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Old 04-09-2012, 06:31 PM
 
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Same thing is and has been happening to our Fraser Firs, from a different woolly adelgid.

Damn immigrant bugs!
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