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Old 09-25-2007, 06:50 AM
 
Location: florida
443 posts, read 1,041,855 times
Reputation: 110
Default I adore all of you..

I just have to say that because you are all so helpful. I am taking these posts and officially starting my Tennessee home notebook. Plan on going to Office Depot today to get a biiiiig binder with all my ideas after reviewing them with hubby.

Our previous home to the one we are in was 4200 on an acre. This one is 3200 on an acre and 3/4. We want to build 2200-2500 on an acre and are thinking of maybe purchasing the lot next to us too..waiting to see if it is sold yet. I dont want any bigger than that. Really. Too much to clean and take care of. I want to do all the fun things retirees do plus as a nurse I will probably continue to work part-time somewhere.

 
Old 09-25-2007, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Atlanta suburb
4,733 posts, read 6,466,426 times
Reputation: 3404
Smile Have a great time, Robbied!

Robbied, I am glad that you were able to get some help from the forum. I depend on it so much myself.

It is great to see that you are so enthusiastic about your new upcoming home. It will be a great experience for you and your husband.

We are doing the same thing as the two of you are with downsizing for retirement. I, too, will be so happy to leave this 4500 sf box to someone who will love it and go back to a reasonably sized, cozy home for two! We hope to build a home with either a walkout and/or a second story that can be inviting for the 4 sons and their families to spread out in when they are all with us for our big family get-togethers. Then, we can close that section of the house off when it is just the two of us. I think I have the plans pretty well worked out.

Please keep us up to date on your photo and note collecting, the progress of your build, and all of the good and frustrating (yes, there will be a few) experiences of your new home.

We're very happy for you both.
 
Old 09-25-2007, 11:02 AM
 
30 posts, read 77,248 times
Reputation: 13
This is such a useful thread. Thank you so much for alll the info.
I am currently in the UK and hope to move to Tn, hopefully near Cookeville in a year.
We are researching the area, but we have never had a new build, and it is a little scary as well as exciting.
 
Old 09-25-2007, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Alabama!
5,003 posts, read 10,604,623 times
Reputation: 2677
gemthornton, it's so much fun to read your posts! Why NOT become a contractor yourself? I wish there were more female contractors...architects...carpenters, electricians & plumbers...maybe then we would not have homes with all the bedrooms on the 2nd floor, but the washer/dryer in the basement LOL! I have always had to argue with the folks doing my cabinets. They insist on mounting them for a 6' tall person. I'm 5' tall...
I loved your suggestion about putting extra 2 x 4s for mounting towel bars etc. How about for mounting handicap bars? We installed several in our house for my mom, and they've been so useful...especially after I had knee replacement surgery. It would be WAY cheaper to build in some accessibility features when the house is built, rather than having to retrofit.
 
Old 09-25-2007, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Atlanta suburb
4,733 posts, read 6,466,426 times
Reputation: 3404
Smile I'm glad some of the suggestions help and give you ideas!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Southlander View Post
gemthornton, it's so much fun to read your posts! Why NOT become a contractor yourself? I wish there were more female contractors...architects...carpenters, electricians & plumbers...maybe then we would not have homes with all the bedrooms on the 2nd floor, but the washer/dryer in the basement LOL! I have always had to argue with the folks doing my cabinets. They insist on mounting them for a 6' tall person. I'm 5' tall...
I loved your suggestion about putting extra 2 x 4s for mounting towel bars etc. How about for mounting handicap bars? We installed several in our house for my mom, and they've been so useful...especially after I had knee replacement surgery. It would be WAY cheaper to build in some accessibility features when the house is built, rather than having to retrofit.
Southlander, that is exactly why I started to get so involved in the building process. One, I love doing it. Secondly, I grew up in a family where if you wanted a new winter coat, you made one. If you needed a lamp repaired, you rewired it yourself (Did one for a speech class in jr. high school!).

But, the biggest reason is the one that you mentioned - a woman needs to make her family nest. And, there are very few men who get what women really want in a house.

Upper cabinets are always mounted too high and if they just dropped 1 - 2 inches (which I had done in our last house by 1.5") most women could actually use the upper shelves. And, how many women want all of the bathrooms to be interior spaces without windows? Not me or anyone I know. But, that is where you find so many of them now. If women are always running into the trash cans in the garage, why don't architects just make the garage 22' deep instead of 21' - even worse, some are only 20'.

Now, you got me started, Southlander. I could go on and on about all the little goofs that don't bother anybody but the woman who has to live with it or around it.

I may try to general our next homebuild, but only if we are renting in the area and I can be at it 24/7 because it does take a tremendous amount of time, supervision, and research. Sounds like a lot of fun to me, huh?
 
Old 09-25-2007, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Atlanta suburb
4,733 posts, read 6,466,426 times
Reputation: 3404
Quote:
Originally Posted by taniaxx View Post
This is such a useful thread. Thank you so much for alll the info.
I am currently in the UK and hope to move to Tn, hopefully near Cookeville in a year.
We are researching the area, but we have never had a new build, and it is a little scary as well as exciting.
It can be very exciting, taniaxx. Lots of prep work and research make it so much easier, but many people (including my husband) would rather have a root canal than try to build a house. He has always turned everything over to me to handle when we have remodeled or built. He cannot handle the stress of making so many decisions - for a house. Now, for his job, that is a different story.

Hope you make it to Cookeville, next year. We hope to be settled in by then ourselves. Best of everything to you.
 
Old 09-25-2007, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
6,300 posts, read 15,488,923 times
Reputation: 1597
Quote:
Originally Posted by gemthornton View Post
Upper cabinets are always mounted too high and if they just dropped 1 - 2 inches (which I had done in our last house by 1.5") most women could actually use the upper shelves.
I understand, for the opposite reason. If I ever build a house I'm going to have at least one run of base cabinets in the kitchen which are higher than 36". I'm a tall guy; working at a 36" counter is like a shorter person working at thigh level (no joke, a 36" tall counter comes right to my crotch level). It's very uncomfortable. If you're short, try working at a countertop where you have to always stoop slightly; say, down to a workspace about 28" or 30" tall.

And if I ever build a custom house, I've going to do the counters differently along one wall. With all the small appliances now, I want a double level countertop, a narrow strip to the back and a lower countertop in front with lots of electrical outlet in the wall behind. The taller counter would be used for small applances like coffee grinders, and food processors, and whatever.
 
Old 09-25-2007, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Atlanta suburb
4,733 posts, read 6,466,426 times
Reputation: 3404
Thumbs up Excellent points, alleycat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by alleycat View Post
I understand, for the opposite reason. If I ever build a house I'm going to have at least one run of base cabinets in the kitchen which are higher than 36". I'm a tall guy; working at a 36" counter is like a shorter person working at thigh level (no joke, a 36" tall counter comes right to my crotch level). It's very uncomfortable. If you're short, try working at a countertop where you have to always stoop slightly; say, down to a workspace about 28" or 30" tall.

And if I ever build a custom house, I've going to do the counters differently along one wall. With all the small appliances now, I want a double level countertop, a narrow strip to the back and a lower countertop in front with lots of electrical outlet in the wall behind. The taller counter would be used for small applances like coffee grinders, and food processors, and whatever.
Those couple of inches do make a tremendous difference, alleycat. Most of the time when base cabinets are raised to accommodate taller people (me, too - 5'8") they only have to come up 3 -4 inches and it is a great help.

When I handled our first bath remodel about 18 years ago, I asked the cabinet maker to make the vanities 35" for both my tall husband and myself. Boy, did that ever reduce the splash factor when washing one's face! Now, you can get taller vanity cabinets very easily, but our cabinet maker then thought I was crazy. We have done it with every house since.

With kitchen upper cabinets getting taller 42 -48", if you don't make some accommodation for most women, you might as well forget the top shelf. I do like the principle behind dedicated higher countertops with standard height countertops, but they do infringe a bit on spread workable counter space, like baking lots of cookies with three kids helping. But, they are quite useful. I bet all of us together could put together an interesting manual for the builders out there to make life easier for all of us. (Like Southlander's handicap bars being put in with a new build. They could look like and be used as towel bars when not needed as handicap bars. And, get them mounted on a STUD - good to go!)
 
Old 09-25-2007, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
6,300 posts, read 15,488,923 times
Reputation: 1597
Quote:
Originally Posted by gemthornton View Post
Those couple of inches do make a tremendous difference, alleycat. Most of the time when base cabinets are raised to accommodate taller people (me, too - 5'8") they only have to come up 3 -4 inches and it is a great help.

When I handled our first bath remodel about 18 years ago, I asked the cabinet maker to make the vanities 35" for both my tall husband and myself. Boy, did that ever reduce the splash factor when washing one's face! Now, you can get taller vanity cabinets very easily, but our cabinet maker then thought I was crazy. We have done it with every house since.

With kitchen upper cabinets getting taller 42 -48", if you don't make some accommodation for most women, you might as well forget the top shelf. I do like the principle behind dedicated higher countertops with standard height countertops, but they do infringe a bit on spread workable counter space, like baking lots of cookies with three kids helping. But, they are quite useful. I bet all of us together could put together an interesting manual for the builders out there to make life easier for all of us. (Like Southlander's handicap bars being put in with a new build. They could look like and be used as towel bars when not needed as handicap bars. And, get them mounted on a STUD - good to go!)
I designed an adjustable counter one time, but it was never put in the house.

I think the strangest house plan I ever designed was a house for an executive whose children had already left home. It was a huge house . . . but with only two bedrooms (but with a bath that was about 480 square feet). Oh, I did design a solar house one time . . . but I don't want to talk about that. ;-)
 
Old 09-25-2007, 02:24 PM
 
9,020 posts, read 21,171,941 times
Reputation: 5795
Quote:
Originally Posted by alleycat View Post
I understand, for the opposite reason. If I ever build a house I'm going to have at least one run of base cabinets in the kitchen which are higher than 36". I'm a tall guy; working at a 36" counter is like a shorter person working at thigh level (no joke, a 36" tall counter comes right to my crotch level). It's very uncomfortable. If you're short, try working at a countertop where you have to always stoop slightly; say, down to a workspace about 28" or 30" tall.

And if I ever build a custom house, I've going to do the counters differently along one wall. With all the small appliances now, I want a double level countertop, a narrow strip to the back and a lower countertop in front with lots of electrical outlet in the wall behind. The taller counter would be used for small applances like coffee grinders, and food processors, and whatever.
You're not kidding about the short cabinets. I'm not as tall as you, but when I go to China I feel like the jolly green giant. I stay in an apartment with a Chinese kitchen, meaning very short cabinets, and I usually end up taking food to the dining room table and sit down to work, otherwise my back kills me having to bend over so much in the kitchen.

So I'm with you, a custom house should have a kitchen designed for men as well as for women.
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