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Old 06-19-2012, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Somewhere over the rainbow in "OZ "
23,655 posts, read 21,987,948 times
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Master link for all Chamber of Commerce with in the State of Tennessee. The Chambers are a great resource of information.
Tennessee Chamber of Commerce :: Home
And this is a link for all counties in the State. http://www.tn.gov/local/ hoover your mouse over county,then click on that county.
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Old 06-19-2012, 09:44 AM
 
41 posts, read 74,745 times
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Originally Posted by TN Tin Man View Post
Master link for all Chamber of Commerce with in the State of Tennessee. The Chambers are a great resource of information.
Tennessee Chamber of Commerce :: Home
And this is a link for all counties in the State. TN.gov hoover your mouse over county,then click on that county.
Very helpful, thank you!
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Old 06-19-2012, 10:27 AM
 
6,385 posts, read 10,374,828 times
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Originally Posted by AppalachianAngler View Post
Spring Hill, IMO, is not desirable. Just your typical cookie cutter houses clogged next to each other that were just built within the past couple years. Again, it's personal preference, but to me there is no character.
There's character in Spring Hill. About 2 blocks worth.
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Old 06-19-2012, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Crosstown *****
1,050 posts, read 1,609,595 times
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Originally Posted by NYC_Gal_88 View Post
Very helpful, thank you!

Honestly I get sick of sticking up for Memphis against other Tennesseans in theis forum. I realize not all feel the same way as some posters who I question if they have even been here. One thing I will say, I love all parts of the state. It's all unique. But Memphis is where the culture is, and yes the Evil Herenton is now gone, and since the new mayor has taken office, things are on the upswing again. I will not say anything bad about the state, but I have lived in East TN as well as Memphis so I have experiences in both. I have many friends in Middle TN. All great people. My wife is from Chicago, I have spent so much time there I thought about moving, actually, I met her there in Greektown at UC watching a Widespread Panic show.

But I think some questions and comments can be summed up in this post, by Infidel in the Memphis forum, who actually visited the city...some ironies here for sure.

'Nice thread going on here, it's been an interesting read. At the risk of hijacking this thread, I thought I'd give my impression from my afternoon of driving and walking around a few parts of the city.

This has been my first visit to the city. I grew up in New England, went to school in upstate NY (Troy, which was a real ex-garment-manufacturing dump of a city at the time), worked in Boston and the extended 'burbs, 12+ years in the greater Seattle area, 10 years in Spokane, WA. I'm on a 'round-the-country car trip right now, and have so far had the pleasure of visiting Bozeman MT, Boulder, Denver, Austin, New Orleans, and now Memphis.

From reading these forums, I had very low expectations of Memphis. In fact I thought that I might find largely a dangerous ghetto here. I'm at the Hilton out east just off 240, an enormously generic place to be it seems. This afternoon, after visiting the wikitravel site, I made a short list of destinations. The first was Burke's bookstore which is, I guess, in an area called Cooper-Young(?). What a cool little neighborhood! I mean, it's modest for what it is, not entirely city-hipster, but with the “right” kind of vibe. The girl in the bookstore had read Hitchens' “God is Not Great” and loved his writing, who'd have thought I'd encounter THAT here (again, bear in mind my incoming expectations)? The coffee shop there was really groovy, as character-laden as any arty-coffee place in any other city I've seen. The restaurants there seemed to be doing pretty well judging by the volume of customers.

Speaking of character, on my way from there downtown, I found myself on Peabody Ave, and WOW. Unbelievable, beautiful big historic houses, as nice as I've seen anywhere. I'm guessing that if I'd taken a few loops along the side streets there I'd have found more of the same. So that was the dark, urban core of Memphis? Sign me up!

Downtown, I parked just off Main, near the Civil Rights museum. Saturday afternoon downtown in a big city, and parking was trivially easy to find. What's up with that anyway? Where's the hassle that I so look forward to when I go to the heart of a city? Walking north on Main, I took in all the beautiful historic old buildings and had to smile at the streetcars. Clearly the city has been working on making downtown a destination. Saturday afternoon, but the sidewalks were mostly empty! A great many of the storefronts were empty too but there were also a fair number of interesting looking boutique shops and restaurants. The heart is still beating. As I walked, the thought that came to my mind was “wow, this is just begging for renovation and (mixed-use) development”. What's been done with Omaha's riverfront comes to mind. It's kind of astonishing that in a city this big, with what appears to be a functioning economy, that this has not happened by now. In my mind's eye I see condos in those tall, closed-up old buildings. I see indie bookstores on the corner (ala Seattle's Elliot Bay, Spokane's Aunties, Denver's Tattered Cover), I see independent coffee shops sprinkled amongst the boutiques. Why not?

I've been here for almost exactly 24 hours now, have all of about six hours of experience looking around, have probably missed a huge part of both the good and the bad. And sad to say I'm leaving tomorrow morning. But in that time I haven't seen anything awful, I've seen some things that were really great, and I've sensed the seed of that somewhat liberal, educated, professional, somewhat younger culture that well-off cities seem to have these days (apologies to conservatives out there).

It seems to me that Memphis has enormous potential. I'm curious to know what you think is missing that would prevent the transformation of the city proper into a poster-child for urban renewal. Is the nature of the economy a hindrance? Are there too few good colleges/universities turning out educated people who want to stay? Is there some other “attitude problem” that I'm missing?

I hope to visit again and spend some more time exploring.'
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Old 06-19-2012, 12:18 PM
 
41 posts, read 74,745 times
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Originally Posted by knucklehead_vol View Post
Honestly I get sick of sticking up for Memphis against other Tennesseans in theis forum. I realize not all feel the same way as some posters who I question if they have even been here. One thing I will say, I love all parts of the state. It's all unique. But Memphis is where the culture is, and yes the Evil Herenton is now gone, and since the new mayor has taken office, things are on the upswing again. I will not say anything bad about the state, but I have lived in East TN as well as Memphis so I have experiences in both. I have many friends in Middle TN. All great people. My wife is from Chicago, I have spent so much time there I thought about moving, actually, I met her there in Greektown at UC watching a Widespread Panic show.
[/i]
Thank you for that, it was definitely a very informative and interesting article. I keep on getting mixed reviews on Memphis, so I'm planning on taking some extra time to explore it in September to figure it out for myself. After all of the research, it seems like Memphis is similar to Brooklyn (where I spend a lot of time). One area is really nice, but the next few streets over is a ghetto broken down area. Maybe I will end up liking it since I won't feel as much of a culture shock as say, moving to somewhere like Lynnville where it's a small rural town (I told you, I did my research lol).

I phoned a friend today that moved to NYC from Memphis about 5 years ago. He also told me to stay in a city, such as Memphis, Nashville, Knoxville. He also told me a lot of good things about Cookeville, but that's one place that I haven't looked into yet.

My main concern of course is finding a job, but it's also finding a place where I can feel comfortable. Since I don't know anyone that currently lives there (except for one relative that lives in Germantown that I haven't seen in a long time), I'm hoping that I can become comfortable with the locals quickly. I have only heard wonderful things about Tennesseans, so hopefully it all goes well.

I do have a question though. What do Tennesseans think about people from the Northeast? I keep hearing mixed reviews about that. I don't want to be afraid to speak to people because of my Yankee accent and don't want to be judged as being a hot-headed, rude, inpatient psychopath from the North because of it.
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Old 06-19-2012, 03:26 PM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
9,519 posts, read 13,357,488 times
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The accent is fine, most people won't have a problem with it and the few yokels that do won't be worth your bother anyway. You might get some questions, some people might call you a yankee. Some people seem to get offended by that, but take it with a grain of salt. Most people won't mean anything by it, and usually you can tell whether they are kidding around with you.
What might take some adjustment is the manner of speaking. People from other places sometimes are...abrupt is not quite the right word, but they are more likely to just get to business and be done with it. Down here it's more drawn out. For example if you walk into a McDonalds you don't just go up to the counter, place your order, pay your money and go. Instead you're likely to get a big "Hey, how y'all doing?" and a little bit of chitchat to go with your meal.
It's nice but it can take some getting used to, especially if you in line at the grocery store and it seems like the cashier wants to chat up everybody in front of you, lol.

Memphis-has it's good point and it's bad. It has suffered from a lack of good leadership and has some problems to overcome. It can be a good fit for some people though (too hot and humid for me) and is worth checking out. IMO it has a very different vibe from the eastern part of TN so it's a great idea to take your time and get a feel for the different cities.
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Old 06-19-2012, 03:37 PM
 
6,385 posts, read 10,374,828 times
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Originally Posted by NYC_Gal_88 View Post
I do have a question though. What do Tennesseans think about people from the Northeast? I keep hearing mixed reviews about that. I don't want to be afraid to speak to people because of my Yankee accent and don't want to be judged as being a hot-headed, rude, inpatient psychopath from the North because of it.
Well, I think that pretty much covers it.

I'm a native Tennessean, so I can't speak for what it is like moving here, but I think people generally encounter a lot of different attitudes. Much of it has to do with exposure.

If you move to one of the big 4 cites (Memphis, Nashville, Knoxville, and Chattanooga), you will likely find fewer people that will comment or even care about your Yankee accent, because there are a number of people they come across on a daily basis that share that accent. Nashville has had the highest growth rate and the most transplants, so you are bound to find more people from your area living in the metro. Memphis shouldn't be too bad in that regard. Knoxville, though smaller, has a pretty steady growth rate as well. It also has the state's flagship public university (UT), so it naturally draws quite a few out of state residents.

Places like Cookeville and Crossville have become popular with retirees, so there is some exposure there. I think where you would find the most resistance would be in the smaller, more insular towns that are off the beaten path. Most places have joined the real world at this point, but there are still some out there that are leery of outsiders (even outsiders from within the state of Tennessee).



As for my personal experience with "Yankees"....it's all over the map. In my nearly 27 years living in Nashville (with also a brief stint in college in Knoxville), I have seen quite a bit of change. Early in my childhood, hearing a Yankee accent might warrant a head-turning. Who is this person that's not from here? I'm fascinated by their accent. What are they saying? They talk too fast!

Now it has become fairly normal. (Speaking from a Nashville perspective) We have a lot of transplants living here these days. The big groups that I recognize are from the New York metro (including New Jersey and maybe some Connecticut) area, the Michigan/Ohio area, the Chicago area, and California. I'm not including Southern transplants, because IMO they tend to come and go...and they are usually harder to pick out (except for Floridians).

I try not to be nosy, but when I find out someone has relocated here from elsewhere, I usually ask them about where they came from. I try to keep it conversational and not be prying, so usually I can get a lot of information. What I have discovered is very interesting. From my experience, there are two pretty distinct classes of transplants: those that really like living here as opposed to where they moved from, and those who can't seem to get comfortable because it's too "different" here. Most of the latter category come from the larger cities and are used to a more hectic urban lifestyle, and don't like the fact that you can't take a train from Franklin to work in Nashville (about a 20-25 mile trip), and that most stores and restaurants are closed by 9-10 pm.

From the ones that like living here, there are a variety of reasons why they moved. Weather, politics, cost of living. I've found it interesting that many, especially from the Midwest, are quite down about where they came from. (With the main exception of Chicago) I hear "it's a dump. I'm glad I got out when I could. I love it here. The weather is a lot better" etc. I have also noticed that many from the Midwest (with heavier accents) as well as those from the Northeast often have an apologetic tone. While I try not to come across with a "what are YOU doing here?" vibe, sometimes I get the feeling that some feel ashamed that they have an accent. They like living here, but they wish their accent wasn't such a tell of where they are from...that they don't want to be considered an outsider. I do wonder if some of these people have encountered judgmental people before that assumed what you were saying (hot-headed, rude, impatient) about them.

While all of the transplant groups have an element of "why aren't things like where I came from?" in them, I have noticed most often for this to be true with Californians. It's not true with all of them by any means, but I sometimes wonder if that is actually a bigger culture shock for them than it is for people from the North.

In the end...it might not be answering much, but some love living here, and some hate it and can't wait to get away. I think a lot of it has to do with the attitude you bring in.



To give you some friendly advice, if you end up moving here, you need to recognize that things will be different. Some differences are slight, some are major. You will have to accept wherever you decide to move for what it is. There are tradeoffs. (I'm sure you already know, or have thought about some of this, but I'm putting it in writing.)

People from the North tend to be more abrupt and to the point...more blunt than people from the South. While I don't think that is necessarily a sign that someone is rude or impatient, it can be taken as such. Mannerisms are a bit different here than in New York. While not everyone uses them here, it's a good idea to get in the habit of "please" and "yes and no thank you", smiling, waving, and generally chit-chatting during idle time. If you do things like this, even with your accent, I doubt you will come across as rude, hot-headed, or impatient. Not everyone -- Southerner or not, will return the favor. But don't get discouraged. If you are nice and open to other people, most will be nice and open to you.
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Old 06-19-2012, 03:44 PM
 
6,385 posts, read 10,374,828 times
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Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
The accent is fine, most people won't have a problem with it and the few yokels that do won't be worth your bother anyway. You might get some questions, some people might call you a yankee. Some people seem to get offended by that, but take it with a grain of salt. Most people won't mean anything by it, and usually you can tell whether they are kidding around with you.
Very good points (as well as the rest of your post). I think sometimes "Yankees" (and other northerners) are sometimes put off when they are called as such. A lot of the time it's a gentle jab or tease. I get that it can sometimes be too much, or insulting...but a lot of the time it's intended to be harmless. I had a coworker from Detroit that I'm (still) good friends with, and we constantly poke fun at each other about where we are from. It never gets heated. A lot of the time it's a tease when he doesn't quite get something "culturally" about the South. Sort of a back and forth thing.

Not taking offense (and when you get to know the person, possibly returning fire) is the best way to handle it. Being "the Yankee" is better than being nothing at all. It probably means you are becoming accepted into the fold (sort of like having a nickname).
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Old 06-19-2012, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Memphis
344 posts, read 1,037,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knucklehead_vol View Post
Honestly I get sick of sticking up for Memphis against other Tennesseans in theis forum. I realize not all feel the same way as some posters who I question if they have even been here. One thing I will say, I love all parts of the state. It's all unique. But Memphis is where the culture is, and yes the Evil Herenton is now gone, and since the new mayor has taken office, things are on the upswing again. I will not say anything bad about the state, but I have lived in East TN as well as Memphis so I have experiences in both. I have many friends in Middle TN. All great people. My wife is from Chicago, I have spent so much time there I thought about moving, actually, I met her there in Greektown at UC watching a Widespread Panic show.
Are you from Memphis originally?

There are great parts about Memphis, no doubt. I actually love visiting. It's just...when I think about Tennessee, I think there are other parts that are more representative of the state. Of course, this is just my view. Best advice is probably just to take a good old road trip across our long state and see.

(BTW, awesome story! Fellow Spreadhead here. Have seen about 2 dozen shows; never seen 'em outside the South though, unfortunately, but did catch most all of my shows in the Mikey years.)
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Old 06-19-2012, 04:34 PM
 
41 posts, read 74,745 times
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Originally Posted by nashvols View Post

People from the North tend to be more abrupt and to the point...more blunt than people from the South. While I don't think that is necessarily a sign that someone is rude or impatient, it can be taken as such. Mannerisms are a bit different here than in New York. While not everyone uses them here, it's a good idea to get in the habit of "please" and "yes and no thank you", smiling, waving, and generally chit-chatting during idle time. If you do things like this, even with your accent, I doubt you will come across as rude, hot-headed, or impatient. Not everyone -- Southerner or not, will return the favor. But don't get discouraged. If you are nice and open to other people, most will be nice and open to you.
I don't really have a New York accent which I am very pleased about, but I talk VERY FAST. When I talk to people who are not used to the way New Yorkers speak, I am always asked to slow down. I always get embarrassed about it, but I know that t's something that can change. I actually have manners (which is very rare for people from my town) and I'm glad that I will be moving to a place where people say thank you and actually mean it!

I also don't mind being called a yankee, it doesn't offend me the least bit. I know that it's an old-term referring to northerners and not something that will be said to personally hurt my feelings. The best part to me is people asking questions about where someone is from. I think it's wonderful that Southerners generally make people feel welcome and like to make friendly conversations. It's something that definitely lacks up North.
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