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Old 10-08-2007, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Signal Mountain, Tennessee
849 posts, read 2,032,372 times
Reputation: 351

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What are the types trees you want to keep when clearing a lot? I know the dogwoods are keepers(any other trees that flower?), but I'm interested in the types of trees to keep so that I don't eventually clear the wrong ones when planning my home site.

Are there certain trees that you want on certain sides of the home? What works best on the west side, the east side, etc. Not sure if there is much difference throughout Tennessee, but I am interested in what works best on the Cumberland Plateau.

Are there certain trees that lumber companies are interested in that they would clear for no charge??

Thanks for all of your responses in advance.
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Old 10-08-2007, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
2,173 posts, read 5,023,839 times
Reputation: 1435
You can get a bunch of information at UT extension
The University of Tennessee Extension
If you want more focused help, contact the UT Arboretum in Oak Ridge
The University of Tennessee - Forest Resources Research and Education Center
I've found the UT plant folks (UT is an ag college) to be extremely helpful and very responsive to phone calls and e-mails.
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Old 10-08-2007, 07:03 PM
 
Location: South of DAYTON
1,109 posts, read 3,049,886 times
Reputation: 502
Default Your the Customer.

G.B.: Mostly your the owner, inspect what looks straight and healthly.
Doubt any more contractors will cut / haul for free, but keep advertising, may meet a nice neighbor. One of our church carvers interested in HIckory. We lost some Hickory this year with late spring freeze and this 20 year drought. .Most of the lumber companies sold off their land , and the Pine blight had killed most of trees. Heard it comes every 7 years.?
Anyhow REDBUD (Heart shape leaves) are beautiful pink early spring flowers and grow in the wild, very decorative. TULIP - POPULAR (Palm shape leaf) , fast growing, TALL (SailBoat Masts), are interesting, some spring color, autumn shape pistol pedistals,?
. Large variety up here, Sweet Gum, Oaks, Elms, Maples, etc. Some people are leery to leave tall trees near any side of house. Can always cut stuff year after move in if they start to die with the drainage pattern changed, or your septic system. .Enjoy . Bradford PEAR are very early spring WHITE flower bloomers and common, have a weakness to break limbs in wind, NO Fruit, Cleveland PEAR are more sturdy if you buy from Nursery, almost look like covered in SNOW.
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Old 10-08-2007, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Signal Mountain, Tennessee
849 posts, read 2,032,372 times
Reputation: 351
Split - You rock, Knox- Thanks also. Great info. Now I have to do some studying to see what these trees look like.
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Old 10-08-2007, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Somewhere over the rainbow in "OZ "
12,737 posts, read 12,016,790 times
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If you see any Palm Trees feel free too cut them down!!..........
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Old 10-08-2007, 09:21 PM
 
Location: On the plateau, TN
13,670 posts, read 7,217,728 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tinman313 View Post
If you see any Palm Trees feel free too cut them down!!..........
They are "Roach Hazzards"....
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Old 10-08-2007, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Somewhere over the rainbow in "OZ "
12,737 posts, read 12,016,790 times
Reputation: 14270
Exclamation Roach Hazards

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bones View Post
They are "Roach Hazzards"....
Really their Pimento Bugs.Yes their nasty and the tree is just usless for any thing.........
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Old 10-08-2007, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Atlanta suburb
4,733 posts, read 6,613,187 times
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Exclamation All trees are worth keeping, but some not near your house!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grizzlybear34 View Post
What are the types trees you want to keep when clearing a lot? I know the dogwoods are keepers(any other trees that flower?), but I'm interested in the types of trees to keep so that I don't eventually clear the wrong ones when planning my home site.

Are there certain trees that you want on certain sides of the home? What works best on the west side, the east side, etc. Not sure if there is much difference throughout Tennessee, but I am interested in what works best on the Cumberland Plateau.

Are there certain trees that lumber companies are interested in that they would clear for no charge??

Thanks for all of your responses in advance.
There are 2 trees that I have always enjoyed having on our property, but would definitely keep at least 40 - 50 yds. from the house. If you don't have 40 -50 yds. to play with, get rid of these trees: Swamp Oak and River Birch.

I love both of these trees, but their root systems are going to find a water source even if it is your septic system 150 feet away. They develop amazing roots and the trees themselves demand enormous amounts of water. They are great in a low-lying, perpetually wet area of your property where they will gobble up the standing water. Just keep the thirsty green things far away from your domestic water lines or septic system! They are like unstoppable aliens munching their way through concrete, cast iron, and PVC - forget it - it's like a paper bag to these roots.

Many builders just automatically cut them at the get-go and haul them off. Even then, if enough of the stump is left, the swamp things will be back in 2 years looking for your water!

Leave them on the back forty, but remove them any closer than the 50 yard line.

Btw, Redbuds are a thing of beauty in the Spring as are the Bradford and Cleveland pear trees. And, as Split said the Bradford pear are beautiful, but are not very flexible in winds or ice storms. All of the flowering ornamental trees bloom and thrive with lots of sun, although I have seen some Redbuds put out beautiful flowers in partial shade, like dogwood, under tall tree canopies. Dogwood actually do better under a tall tree (like oaks) canopy. Their brachs are not actually a flower and it will be showier in partial shade. Enjoy all of those beauties. They will keep you cool and clean the air around your new home.
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Old 10-08-2007, 11:00 PM
 
411 posts, read 1,017,970 times
Reputation: 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grizzlybear34 View Post
What are the types trees you want to keep when clearing a lot?
If you have any honeylocust, get rid of it FAST!! Also known as crown of thorns, they have oodles of 2-3" spikes that will go right through the sole of a shoe (first hand experience). They are invasive and spread fast (birds eat the seed pods then poop). I no longer live in TN, but those trees were my nemesis when I was there!!!
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Old 10-09-2007, 04:12 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
6,291 posts, read 15,822,862 times
Reputation: 1605
Well, we could give you a whole list of trees to keep, but that's maybe going about it in the wrong direction.

If the lot is more or less a natural area, then probably most of the trees can be left except if they're unhealthy or damaged. Or if you just want to thin out the woods a little; sometime a wooded hillside look nicer and healthier if it is thinned out just a bit.

Very few native trees are "bad trees". Most people here don't want sassafras or cedar trees (actually junipers) in their actual yard, and a few people don't like sweet gum because of the balls they drop, and there's a few others. But it's still up to the individual.

The first thing I think I would suggest is learning exactly what trees you do have. Books would help, also possibly the county extension agent, and also a friendly old-timer who lives in the area. It used to be that anyone who lived in the country could tell you what just about any tree was (a friend and I once got out of part of a ninth grade science class about trees because we already knew what all the trees were). They can tell you a little bit about each type of tree and whether you might want to keep them or remove them.
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