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Old 10-28-2012, 12:16 AM
 
Location: Seattle
6,486 posts, read 13,779,346 times
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There are also the urban poor in Tennessee. Memphis has pockets of very poor, and Nashville, Knoxville, and Chattanooga all have big projects and poor neighborhoods.
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Old 10-28-2012, 06:44 AM
 
Location: Knoxville, Tennessee
22,533 posts, read 46,060,389 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jabogitlu View Post
There are also the urban poor in Tennessee. Memphis has pockets of very poor, and Nashville, Knoxville, and Chattanooga all have big projects and poor neighborhoods.
But every state has big cities with that. It kind of goes without saying. But very poor rural areas? Some states have that but a lot of states don't.
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Old 10-28-2012, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Seattle
6,486 posts, read 13,779,346 times
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Sorry, guess I didn't formulate my thought very well. It was, "the general urban poor combined with the rural poor makes TN a higher participatory state." So, I agree with you hik.
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Old 07-12-2013, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Hendersonville
367 posts, read 772,446 times
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Americans on food stamps - The Washington Post

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv...a/usmap@2x.png
Food stamp monthly averages


Participation
In millions of people

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv...ipation@2x.png

Individual benefit
Received per person

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv...enefits@2x.png

January grocery bill
“Thrifty” plan for men, ages 19-50

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv...grocery@2x.png


Note: USDA’s “thrifty” food plan contains the lowest amount of purchased fats and sweets.

Last edited by JMT; 07-12-2013 at 09:45 PM..
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Old 07-12-2013, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
20,947 posts, read 15,267,317 times
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I'm not at all surprised by this. Outside the big four cities, job opportunities and wages drop drastically. Memphis' reputation is well known. Out in the rural areas, unemployment, low wages, a cycle of dependency, and substance abuse are ways of life. This is completely consistent with food stamp usage.
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Old 07-12-2013, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Tennessee at last!
1,870 posts, read 1,719,956 times
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It also may have to do with how the states administer the program. I live in CA in a County that is know to be 'difficult'. A friend lost her job, no fault of her own and was found to have breast cancer shortly thereafter. She qualified for SNAP with her unemployment. However she had to check back in by going to the office every 60 days. When in chemo they would not allow her to call in, or 'check in' except in person, so she lost SNAP for her and her children until she could schedule an appointment at the county office, after being released from the hospital. She was on and off SNAP for about 6 months as she got treatment and NO understanding from the County. Us friends helped her family with food. And other perfectly healthy folks may be able to call in every 6 months. I know of a person who is allowed to call in and she has not even lived in CA for nearly a year. No rhyme or reason or understanding to who gets what requirements as best I can tell.

So the higher numbers in some states may be because they are administering the program better, nicer, more fairly, and other states have lower numbers because many people just give up and use the food banks. My County has very good food banks, the local community donates to them often as do many groups-scouts, churches, etc.
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Old 07-12-2013, 09:40 PM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
9,480 posts, read 13,334,142 times
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The 'big four' accounted for roughly one third of TN food stamp usage last month, with Memphis far and away in the lead.
http://tennessee.gov/humanserv/adfam...s/FSPP0613.pdf

(anyone good with math and bored enough to break it down by % of county residents on SNAP?)
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Old 07-20-2013, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
20,947 posts, read 15,267,317 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
The 'big four' accounted for roughly one third of TN food stamp usage last month, with Memphis far and away in the lead.
http://tennessee.gov/humanserv/adfam...s/FSPP0613.pdf

(anyone good with math and bored enough to break it down by % of county residents on SNAP?)
I bet the big four metros are more than a third of the state's population. If they are only using a third of the SNAP benefits that come into the state, the rural areas seem to be worse off proportionally.
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Old 07-28-2013, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Western North Carolina
4,741 posts, read 7,533,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hiknapster View Post
But every state has big cities with that. It kind of goes without saying. But very poor rural areas? Some states have that but a lot of states don't.
Rural areas used to be supported by plants, mills, manufacturing - the types of jobs they sent overseas.

The shipping overseas of the textile industry has absolutely devastated small towns in rural North Carolina for example.

Those lost jobs have mostly been replaced by low wage jobs at places like Wal-mart and restaurant chains.

Unless one can get a successful business of their own going, where are people in rural areas going to work for enough wages to provide for the costs of today's housing, food, etc.? This is why there is the high reliance of food stamps and other goverment assistance in rural areas.
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Old 08-01-2013, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Here
2,581 posts, read 5,471,896 times
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I'm surprised no one has brought up the race percentage.
For 2010, ~22% of blacks are on the program vs ~6.5% of whites.

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Quote:
Fiscal Year 2010.......
36% of participants are White, 22% are African-American, 10% are Hispanic, 2% are Asian, 4% are Native American, and 19% are of unknown race or ethnicity.
SNAP Annual Persons Partipating - Average
Quote:
FY 2010.....40,301,878
So at 36% that means 14,508,676 Whites and 8,866,413 blacks.

Demographics of the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Quote:
White or European American 223,553,265. Black or African American 38,929,319


So basically, 6.49% of whites use it vs. 22.77% of blacks.





http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2...amps.html?_r=0
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