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Old 11-28-2012, 06:20 PM
 
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We are from Northern Indiana and get quite a bit of snow and an occassional ice storm. I know Tennessee gets a subtantially smaller amount of snow. So, do you get more ice instead?
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Old 11-28-2012, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Kingsport, TN
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The state's topography and winter weather vary greatly. But I think it's safe to say that ice storms (i.e., freezing rain) are not significantly more common anywhere in TN than what you experience in Indiana, even with the moisture that sometimes flows into the state from the Gulf. Our icy roads usually come about from melted snow or rain that (re)freezes at night.
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Old 11-28-2012, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
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We do get icy conditions fairly often, but the problem is that people here do not know how to drive in bad conditions.

In general people don't slow down and don't understand physics.

Is this really something that will affect your decision to move here??
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Old 11-29-2012, 05:34 AM
 
Location: Sango, TN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2mny View Post
We are from Northern Indiana and get quite a bit of snow and an occassional ice storm. I know Tennessee gets a subtantially smaller amount of snow. So, do you get more ice instead?

I've lived in the snow belt of Michigan, Kalamzaoo for 2.5 years. 3 winters.

Ice is far worse then snow to drive on. Yes, we get more ice then Michigan did. However, its less often. Does that make sense?

When it does get nasty, it gets real nasty, it just doesn't happen that often. What you've got to look out for here, is people don't know how to handle a car when it gets bad outside. Two inches of snow here is a shut down event.
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Old 11-29-2012, 06:02 AM
 
Location: Chattanooga, TN
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What part of TN are we talking about? There are huge differences between the western farm lands and the eastern mountains. Also, larger cities generally have more funds and equipment available for clearing/salting roads than rural areas. My subdivision is partly in Chattanooga and partly in the county. The city snow plows always stop at the city limits sign; the county residents have to either deal with it or hire a private plow operator.

But in general, there will be far less ice or snow than northern Indiana. I used to live in Kansas City and we had road-affecting winter storms several times every winter (2-3 minor ones lasting less than a day plus 1-2 major ones lasting multiple days). I've lived in Chattanooga 7 winters now and I believe it's snowed/iced a total of 4 times where it affected the roads. The last time was 2 years ago and the roads were bad for 3 days, which was the worst event in those 7 years. It didn't ice or snow at all last year.
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Old 11-29-2012, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Cumberland Co., TN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wmsn4Life View Post
We do get icy conditions fairly often, but the problem is that people here do not know how to drive in bad conditions.

In general people don't slow down and don't understand physics.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Memphis1979 View Post

When it does get nasty, it gets real nasty, it just doesn't happen that often. What you've got to look out for here, is people don't know how to handle a car when it gets bad outside. Two inches of snow here is a shut down event.
Having driven here for 34 years I have to comment that what I see is the transplants from FL and CA and south of the boarder are the ones that do not know how to drive in snow and ice.
Story: Where I had my horses boarded there was a big hill that was also a curve. On my way back down the hill from feeding there was a 4-wheel drive truck backing in and out of a drive. I stopped to assess what was going on. A lady that had recently moved here from FL got out and approached me. She was afraid (almost in tears) to drive down the hill. She wanted me, apparently, to drive her in her truck down the hill, then walk back up to get my car.

Another thing people dont realize is that the roads are not cleared like they are many areas of the north. The roads are often hilly, curvy and there are places its seems the sun never shines.
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Old 11-29-2012, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, Tennessee
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I've lived in Knoxville for seven winters and up North, where I am from, it is far, far, worse. They have ice storms of epic proportions along with snowstorms, blizzards and nor'easters galore. In Knoxville I only saw a bad ice storm once, in 2007, and it melted in a few hours.

But as jwkilgore said, Tennessee is a very large state with very different topography and weather. It ranges from flat to mountainous, from brutally hot and muggy to much cooler, although nothing like up north, even in the mountains. The economy across the state can be very different as well. I think you need to do more research and possibly take a trip, mom2mny.
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Old 11-29-2012, 07:22 PM
 
6,385 posts, read 10,368,030 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wmsn4Life View Post
We do get icy conditions fairly often, but the problem is that people here do not know how to drive in bad conditions.

In general people don't slow down and don't understand physics.
Or they slow down too much and get stuck going up hill. Or they slam on their brakes and slide. Or they don't realize that if they are sliding, it's probably not a good idea to try to still make that turn. Or they *still* follow too closely.

Ice + curvy roads + hills makes a lot of Tennessee roads more treacherous than many of their northern or midwestern counterparts (certainly there are some exceptions). Factor in that some people drive it like it was any other day and you have disaster.

FWIW, I think it's everybody -- even the people who claim they are used to driving in such conditions -- that don't know how to handle it.

Except me, of course.
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Old 11-29-2012, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, Tennessee
22,533 posts, read 46,075,513 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nashvols View Post
Or they slow down too much and get stuck going up hill. Or they slam on their brakes and slide. Or they don't realize that if they are sliding, it's probably not a good idea to try to still make that turn. Or they *still* follow too closely.

Ice + curvy roads + hills makes a lot of Tennessee roads more treacherous than many of their northern or midwestern counterparts (certainly there are some exceptions). Factor in that some people drive it like it was any other day and you have disaster.

FWIW, I think it's everybody -- even the people who claim they are used to driving in such conditions -- that don't know how to handle it.

Except me, of course.
Yeah. These mountains go clear up through New England so plenty of us northerners know how to drive on hills, mountains, curves, etc. The big difference is there is an ENORMOUS amount of snow removal and road clearing and safety equipment up there and there needs to be. No matter what year, what the history is, what record that was broke, you all get a FRACTION of the snow and ice that they do up there. Period. And after driving on icy, slippery roads for at least three months or more every darn day you get use to it. So it makes sense when a few inches or so shuts down a Southern city.
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Old 11-29-2012, 10:30 PM
 
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I was a bit worried about ice if I ever find a job in Eastern Tennessee, so its great that I found this post as it answered some questions for me. We are from Minnesota, we are use to driving on snow, and on ice, but the ground driven on could be different due to more curves and hills in Tennessee. We do have hills and curves here, but after the visits to your beautiful state I can say, the degree of hills and curves are more in Tn, along with some being steep and/or hairpin in nature depending on where your driving. I guess simple rule of thumb for us is, try to stock up and watch the weather channel alot!
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