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Old 02-06-2013, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Sango, TN
24,889 posts, read 20,327,161 times
Reputation: 8606

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Interesting, if not ironic, posts. Just for a frame of reference, how does the state or counties keep taxes low, while providing the services that the people need? How would you compare pay in relation to former locations, for those coming from other states? What industries have been growing in the state in recent years?
Services people need, such as?

If you're thinking public transportation, large libraries, parks, and recreation areas, you're barking up the wrong tree. Even the county health department isn't funded well where I came from.
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Old 02-06-2013, 04:06 PM
 
375 posts, read 924,821 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brentwoodgirl View Post
You might want to read the boards a little more. There are a lot more transplants coming and staying than there are leaving.
My statement is backed by census data. Between 2000 and 2010 the population of the town I'm from declined 6.5% while the county population gained about 0.7%. According to 2011 census estimates the county declined in population by 1.1% between 2010 and 2011, stats on the town not available for 2011 but from casual observation it's not going up. In fact, although Tennessee as a whole grew 0.7% between 2010 and 2011 a total of 45 counties lost population. While it's true that the complaints I've heard from transplants who have left this county are anecdotal, I'm not seeing evidence of a mass migration into Tennessee. Not sure how reading the boards more often would change any of that.
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Old 02-06-2013, 04:36 PM
 
6,385 posts, read 10,381,162 times
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Just a quick note...a lot of these comments hold true for certain areas and not others. Services vary statewide. Population change varies statewide. Pretty much like everywhere else.

Most rural areas are seeing stagnant or negative population change...but it's not true with all of them. Same goes for small towns. These areas also typically have the worst employment outlook and struggling economies.

The cities and their surrounding areas tend to be doing a bit better. Nashville & area are leading in the growth department. Both Nashville and Knoxville have decently low unemployment rates. Chattanooga is doing pretty well, too...though not as hot as the above two. Memphis lags behind the rest, but isn't really "struggling" IMO. Things seem to be improving there. The mid size cities and towns are somewhere in between pretty good and mediocre.



yarddawg -- Spencer? That's not exactly a good example to use for the state as a whole. And the 2011 Census estimates are just that...estimates. They've been terribly wrong quite a number of times when estimating growth here (and we're not the only place). I will say that those same estimates place Tennessee as the 12th fastest growing state by raw numbers.
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Old 02-06-2013, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Sango, TN
24,889 posts, read 20,327,161 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nashvols View Post
Just a quick note...a lot of these comments hold true for certain areas and not others. Services vary statewide. Population change varies statewide. Pretty much like everywhere else.

Most rural areas are seeing stagnant or negative population change...but it's not true with all of them. Same goes for small towns. These areas also typically have the worst employment outlook and struggling economies.

The cities and their surrounding areas tend to be doing a bit better. Nashville & area are leading in the growth department. Both Nashville and Knoxville have decently low unemployment rates. Chattanooga is doing pretty well, too...though not as hot as the above two. Memphis lags behind the rest, but isn't really "struggling" IMO. Things seem to be improving there. The mid size cities and towns are somewhere in between pretty good and mediocre.



yarddawg -- Spencer? That's not exactly a good example to use for the state as a whole. And the 2011 Census estimates are just that...estimates. They've been terribly wrong quite a number of times when estimating growth here (and we're not the only place). I will say that those same estimates place Tennessee as the 12th fastest growing state by raw numbers.

They said small town city services. Those are generally non existent.

What many people consider small around Nashville, is considered big to a lot of rural folks. It all depends on what you want and are looking for. Most folks moving to rural areas aren't wanting community service. Its why I asked them what they meant by services people need. I suppose I should have asked what they meant by rural.
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Old 02-06-2013, 05:29 PM
 
6,385 posts, read 10,381,162 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Memphis1979 View Post
They said small town city services. Those are generally non existent.

What many people consider small around Nashville, is considered big to a lot of rural folks. It all depends on what you want and are looking for. Most folks moving to rural areas aren't wanting community service. Its why I asked them what they meant by services people need. I suppose I should have asked what they meant by rural.
I don't see anywhere where the OP mentioned rural or small town...just county services in general. If that's what they meant, then yes, you are at least mostly right. Most rural areas have scant services...county sheriffs, volunteer fire departments, etc.

But in general, this is considered to be a low tax state...the OP was asking if Tennessee was anticipating a lot of growth as a result. While a lot of transplants move here (and elsewhere) to retire, most people moving here move in and around our cities, not our small or tiny towns. There's a great disparity in what each has to offer...and the population statistics generally show that the cities and even some of the mid sized towns are growing, while most of the rural areas are not (or are losing population). Taking the state as a whole, we have a healthy growth rate...and my take is that it's probably going to stay that way. If Tennessee experiences a (bigger) population boom, it won't be due to rural or small town growth.
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Old 02-06-2013, 05:36 PM
 
4,989 posts, read 4,493,507 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Memphis1979 View Post
They said small town city services. Those are generally non existent.

What many people consider small around Nashville, is considered big to a lot of rural folks. It all depends on what you want and are looking for. Most folks moving to rural areas aren't wanting community service. Its why I asked them what they meant by services people need. I suppose I should have asked what they meant by rural.
The orginal post that you replied to didn't specify small town services, they just asked about services in general. Nashville and many of its surrounding areas have good services. The public library system in Davidson and Williamson are both excellent. Nashville has one of the top magnet schools in the country, although their regular schools have some good schools and some that face the urban problems of any city.
Williamson County has fantastic schools. We live in Brentwood, and after much researching for a possible relocation last summer, we realized there are very few places that have the same level of services with the same combination of low taxes, good schools, and similar house prices.

Nashville and Memphis both have great parks.

The issue is that services vary wildly between the big cities, small towns, and rural areas. I think you may have mentioned before that you are from somewhere in Obion County, is that right? The land of the famous pay to spray fire protection that has made national news twice recently when houses have burned down while the fire dept watched. People from cities didn't understand how that could happen. But even after those incidents, the residents of that town have still voted to keep the pay to spray. They want to choose the level of service they receive (in the country, Union City has fire protection) rather than raise everyone's taxes.

So somewhere liek Williamson County you get great schools, great parks, great libraries and great police/fire protection with low taxes, and as one of the wealthiest counties in the country, you also have good salaries.
But in the country outside of Union City, you will also have low taxes, but since it's not close to a big city, and you have less tax base from businesses, you will also have almost no services.

People moving here can choose what is important to them.

As an FYI- I'm pretty sure Union City and Brownsville were the only 2 MSAs in the state that are losing population, and both have lost major manufacturers, but both are some of the smaller MSAs in the state. Nashville is the largest MSA in the state, and it is growing quickly.

Survey ranks Nashville as the No. 1 growth city in the U.S. in 2011 The Commercial Appeal
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Old 02-06-2013, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
39,195 posts, read 37,806,900 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brentwoodgirl View Post

Nashville is the largest MSA in the state, and it is growing quickly.

Survey ranks Nashville as the No. 1 growth city in the U.S. in 2011 The Commercial Appeal

Yep, the population of Nashville's MSA is supposed to grow by 1 million in the next 25 years.
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Old 02-07-2013, 12:11 AM
 
13,470 posts, read 14,467,280 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Interesting, if not ironic, posts. Just for a frame of reference, how does the state or counties keep taxes low, while providing the services that the people need? How would you compare pay in relation to former locations, for those coming from other states? What industries have been growing in the state in recent years?
I would think that the lack of powerful public worker's unions with strong bonds to the political classes (e.g. NJ, CA, IL) are a factor with the lower taxes in TN.
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Old 02-07-2013, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Knoxville, Tennessee
22,538 posts, read 46,113,418 times
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I love how northeasterners snicker when they find out that something might be different than what they've been told. Throw money at the problem and hope for the best? How's that been working out for places like New York and New Jersey? People are hitting the exits.

Now, not all of Tennessee is filled with fabulous government services. Small towns with barely any tax base can be severely lacking in things like decent schools. But some places in Tennessee have great services and a fabulous standard of living.

Granted, our pay is usually a lot lower than up north. However, that is very offset by the cost of living. By northern standards, living here is dirt cheap. And if you work for a northern company - mine is based out of Hartford, Conn. - your pay can be quite good. It's the reason I can thrive here as a single mom dealing with a deadbeat dad.

And bear in mind that I've had children in schools up in the northeast and Florida. I saw the schools as a student myself, and as a reporter, over the years. Knoxville schools are very, very good. In fact, the Mass. school that I graduated from has SEVERELY slipped in the rankings. Money doesn't seem to be working for it.

The other thing is manufacturing and other big businesses are moving here to get away from the money-grubbing states. Nissan, VW and Amazon are now firmly entrenched here along with lots of white collar jobs like mine. In fact, Tennessee is now considered the top automotive state in the country.

I'm sorry that the bedtime story they told you northerners isn't true. Throwing money into a pit doesn't work.

Irony, indeed.
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Old 02-07-2013, 08:25 AM
 
52,717 posts, read 75,627,145 times
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Why is the name calling necessary? I'm actually trying to see how things operate for a state with low taxes. What is interesting is that even in parts of the Northeast, the overall cost of living can actually be at or below the national average. With that said, taxes/tax rates can be high and was wondering as to what examples from a low tax state could be used here, as I think it can have an effect in terms of business climate/jobs. Personally, I think there is some give and take, pro and con to both and can vary. There are different dynamics at play too(i.e.-snow removal or the educational attainment requirement for teachers). So, I'm not here to knock Tennessee or anything like that. Besides, my parents are from the South originally.

It is also tough to compare schools between cities like say Knoxville and Syracuse because one is under a county school system and the other is a city school district. Meaning that children in many county districts can come from various parts of the county versus districts here where they are localized. Rankings are generally test scores based and I also think about the make up of urban schools in the North versus such schools in many Southern cities.

As for industries, I knew about the auto industry, but I was wondering about other industries. Are there any job incubators in the state, for example or are many of the jobs just companies that relocate due to the lower taxes?
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