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Old 02-07-2013, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Knoxville, Tennessee
22,533 posts, read 46,060,389 times
Reputation: 13302

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Unfortunately, I am now at work and can't give a detailed reply. However, I apologize if you thought I called you a name. I didn't as far as I know. If I didn't care, I wouldn't have posted a thoughtful message, complete with a link.

I will say, very quickly, that Knox County's unemployment rate is 5.3 and Syracuse's is 8.9.
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Old 02-07-2013, 08:11 AM
 
4,989 posts, read 4,485,827 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Why is the name calling necessary? I'm actually trying to see how things operate for a state with low taxes. What is interesting is that even in parts of the Northeast, the overall cost of living can actually be at or below the national average. With that said, taxes/tax rates can be high and was wondering as to what examples from a low tax state could be used here, as I think it can have an effect in terms of business climate/jobs. Personally, I think there is some give and take, pro and con to both and can vary. There are different dynamics at play too(i.e.-snow removal or the educational attainment requirement for teachers). So, I'm not here to knock Tennessee or anything like that. Besides, my parents are from the South originally.

It is also tough to compare schools between cities like say Knoxville and Syracuse because one is under a county school system and the other is a city school district. Meaning that children in many county districts can come from various parts of the county versus districts here where they are localized. Rankings are generally test scores based and I also think about the make up of urban schools in the North versus such schools in many Southern cities.

As for industries, I knew about the auto industry, but I was wondering about other industries. Are there any job incubators in the state, for example or are many of the jobs just companies that relocate due to the lower taxes?
And it's even tougher to compare schools by states. Most people focus on ACT scores as a measure of how states compare. But that's not a good measurement because the percentage of students taking the ACT is so different in each state. TN is one of 9 states that requires 100% of students to take the ACT, while less than 10% of students in Maine take the ACT.

All 9 states that require 100% to test are below the national average (CO, IL, TN, KY, LA, MI, MS, ND, WY).
Of the 16 states that have less than 30% taking the ACT, only one is below the national average (HI). Most of the others are 1-2 points above the average.

I don't doubt that rural schools in TN are behind rural schools in some of the NE states, but it's hard to tell exactly where the schools fall unless all the schools test 100%.

Our superintendent did a very good analysis to MA showing if we had only the top 25% testing in our district their scores would be much higher than the 25% that test in MA. (Although in fairness, we have no way of knowing that it is all the top 25% testing in MA, but we know it is a self-selecting, presumably college bound group.)

As far as companies founded here, I don't know that offhand. Fed Ex is definitely a Memphis company through and through, but I think it had some roots in Little Rock.
Here are some others that came to mind:
HCA
Martha White
Vanderbilt
Cracker Barrel
Holiday Inn
Gaylord Enterprises
Corrections Cooperation of America
Community Health Systems
Eastman Chemicals
St. Jude
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Old 02-07-2013, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Knoxville, Tennessee
22,533 posts, read 46,060,389 times
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Quickly, again...

Some in East Tenn.

Pilot Travel Centers
Ruby Tuesday
Denso
Vanderbilt Mortgage
Clayton Homes
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Old 02-07-2013, 08:47 AM
 
52,614 posts, read 75,426,573 times
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Originally Posted by hiknapster View Post
Unfortunately, I am now at work and can't give a detailed reply. However, I apologize if you thought I called you a name. I didn't as far as I know. If I didn't care, I wouldn't have posted a thoughtful message, complete with a link.

I will say, very quickly, that Knox County's unemployment rate is 5.3 and Syracuse's is 8.9.
Syracuse is in Onondaga County, which has a 7.4% unemployment rate. While higher, I believe that it is below the national average.

brentwoodgirl, very good points about schools and testing. That is also what I was trying to find out in terms of industries in the state.

Does Tennessee have any potential technology startups or companies that could be developed considering some of the major universities or colleges in the state like Vanderbilt, UT and Memphis, among others? Or even forming incubators for students to form companies or create jobs in other industries organically? I ask because I could see how the state could form a location within regions in the state where students from colleges/universities in those regions could do this. Nashville has other colleges like Tenn. State, Lipscomb, Belmont, etc. that could have students come together to do that. So, if this isn't happening, that could have an effect on population growth in Tennessee as well, given that you see such activity in states like TX and NC.
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Old 02-07-2013, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Knoxville, Tennessee
22,533 posts, read 46,060,389 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Syracuse is in Onondaga County, which has a 7.4% unemployment rate. While higher, I believe that it is below the national average.

brentwoodgirl, very good points about schools and testing. That is also what I was trying to find out in terms of industries in the state.

Does Tennessee have any potential technology startups or companies that could be developed considering some of the major universities or colleges in the state like Vanderbilt, UT and Memphis, among others? Or even forming incubators for students to form companies or create jobs in other industries organically? I ask because I could see how the state could form a location within regions in the state where students from colleges/universities in those regions could do this. Nashville has other colleges like Tenn. State, Lipscomb, Belmont, etc. that could have students come together to do that. So, if this isn't happening, that could have an effect on population growth in Tennessee as well, given that you see such activity in states like TX and NC.
We do.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory has a partnership with UT-Knoxville, the flagship state school.

Here are some info on various initiatives.

http://www.tennessee.edu/ornl/index.html

Bredesen Center for Interdisciplinary Research and Graduate Education (UTK-ORNL)

UT Knoxville | CBE Partners

http://web.bio.utk.edu/bcmb/faculty/partners.html

http://www.ut-battelle.org/plan.shtml

Let me clarify. I am from the northeast, born and raised and lived there for 33 years. I have family in your area. I've also lived in Florida. I am keenly aware of how things are done in different states and the pros and cons of each. Once again, I can't stress enough the quality of some of the schools in this state. I moved my child to Knox County because of the schools and the quality of life in the area, not to mention the cost. Then again, choose wrong and you could get a very poor educational system. Small-town schools here tend to be some of the worst. Then again, the way things are going in the northeast, the same things seems to be happening.
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Old 02-07-2013, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas
5,221 posts, read 5,573,508 times
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Tennessees population growth is moderate and for the States sake I hope it stays that way.

Nc. Has been booming for years because of pro business laws, colleges and educated population of Raleigh-Durham and Charlotte. Nc. Is not a low tax state! Georgia you've got Atlanta and that name says a lot to a lot of people from around the world.

Many are comparing Nashville to larger and more established urban cities up north and it isn't fare. Nashville is new. They don't have to fund transportation, underground power lines and upgrade infrastructure to accommodate 30k people per square mile. Its not on that level and will never be. There are many areas of the north where the cost of living is low with a thriving economy.

I personally would never live anywhere near the Bible belt. Pentecostalism Evangelical southern Baptist movement has influences the culture to much. I don't like the type of friendliness. There are some cities just as friendly up north. That's why I choose urban cities in the Midwest. OTOH, I see the appeal of Tennessee for those who want a milder climate and take advantage of other great things the state has to offer. Its not going to be everyones favorite place. No place is! My prediction is Tennessee is going to grow like it has been. Nashville leading the way. But in no way will it become Atlanta nor should it want to be.
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Old 02-07-2013, 10:58 AM
 
6,385 posts, read 10,362,926 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjtinmemphis View Post
Tennessees population growth is moderate and for the States sake I hope it stays that way.

Nc. Has been booming for years because of pro business laws, colleges and educated population of Raleigh-Durham and Charlotte. Nc. Is not a low tax state! Georgia you've got Atlanta and that name says a lot to a lot of people from around the world.

Many are comparing Nashville to larger and more established urban cities up north and it isn't fare. Nashville is new. They don't have to fund transportation, underground power lines and upgrade infrastructure to accommodate 30k people per square mile. Its not on that level and will never be. There are many areas of the north where the cost of living is low with a thriving economy.

I personally would never live anywhere near the Bible belt. Pentecostalism Evangelical southern Baptist movement has influences the culture to much. I don't like the type of friendliness. There are some cities just as friendly up north. That's why I choose urban cities in the Midwest. OTOH, I see the appeal of Tennessee for those who want a milder climate and take advantage of other great things the state has to offer. Its not going to be everyones favorite place. No place is! My prediction is Tennessee is going to grow like it has been. Nashville leading the way. But in no way will it become Atlanta nor should it want to be.
I agree with you on growth. Nashville is growing perhaps a little too much, in fact, which is putting a strain on infrastructure. I'm all for having a healthy growth rate, but it is hard to combat sprawl with a high growth rate. I personally don't want to see us hit the Charlotte/Atlanta/Raleigh levels of the 90s/00s. You're right. We don't want to be like Atlanta. I mean, there are certain benefits of being a large city...but the massive scale of growth is not one of them IMO. Nashville as a city is (somewhat) quietly adding quite a bit of residential infill in the core -- something that it lacked for several decades up until now. I would prefer to see the majority of the growth be in the already established boundaries of both the city and the suburbs. There is still a lot of unused/underused land closer to town...which is why it pains me to see massive developments extending the urban/suburban borders.

I do think Tennessee as a whole will continue to see a healthy growth rate...somewhere in the top 20 (top 10-15 in raw number). I don't really want to see it higher than that.

Last edited by JMT; 02-07-2013 at 03:09 PM.. Reason: Deleted the part of your post that was a response to another post which has since been removed.
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Old 02-07-2013, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
39,014 posts, read 37,656,456 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post

Does Tennessee have any potential technology startups or companies that could be developed considering some of the major universities or colleges in the state like Vanderbilt, UT and Memphis, among others? Or even forming incubators for students to form companies or create jobs in other industries organically?
These are all just in Nashville.

Home - Launch Tennessee (LaunchTN)

Startup Tennessee | Creating Jobs by Connecting Tennessee Entrepreneurs with Mentors and Resources

EC Home | Entrepreneur Center

Not our first rodeo.
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Old 02-08-2013, 04:54 AM
 
71 posts, read 94,474 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Memphis1979 View Post
I paid lower taxes in Florida then I do here, counting sales tax. You get a lot of discounts in a lot of places there by flashing your FL drivers license. Tennessee's population explosion has more to do with the cheap labor force, and centralized location. Texas has higher transportation costs due to its size and location, and Florida, insurance will kill you.

But this state is growing, in parts. There are other parts where manufacturing has all but died out, and people are really suffering there. My home town is one of those places. When I go there, its like someone put the brakes on about 1992, and nothing has changed since. All the young kids, like myself, moved away for opportunity elsewhere.
You made some good points. I live in Murfreesboro,TN, which has grown by like over 50% in the last decade. Many companies move in for cheap labor, as the southeast has historically had the lowest wages in the country. I believe last time I looked that TN has the 46th lowest in the country. When companies move here they bring many former employees with them who just want to keep their job and aren't necessarily crazy about coming here. There is no state income tax, but the sales tax in this county is about 10% and there is a smaller sales tax on food. Income tax is obviously a % of your income but with sales tax basically rich and poor are taxed at the same rates. In my opinion, this hurts the poor and lower middle class especially when it comes to having a high tax on food. Now I realize that TN still probably has a lower tax than many but I'm just making a point. With lower wages and a tax that hits the poor hard, there seems to be a bigger gap between rich and poor here. Also with lower taxes definitely comes fewer and poorer quality services, including schools, parks, infrastructure, and much more. I'm not a fan of huge government but it should be responsible for some things and it seems like here everything is sort of left up to the individual. The schools leave a large part of the education up to the parents compared to where I grew up. They have about 30 fundraisers a year, many of which kids can be rewarded with grades for raising money. If your child wants to play a sport middle school or high school I hope you are pretty well off because the parents of players usually fund the building and up keep of athletic fields and other facilities apparently because they can't get any money from the state. Once again if you are coming from the east coast, this may be a joke to you, but the formerly cheap housing of the south is skyrocketing in the heavy growth areas now as well. If you own a business, come on down. If you are just an average Joe, think twice about it.
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Old 02-08-2013, 05:38 AM
 
Location: Knoxville, Tennessee
22,533 posts, read 46,060,389 times
Reputation: 13302
Quote:
Originally Posted by TENNYOOPER View Post
With lower wages and a tax that hits the poor hard, there seems to be a bigger gap between rich and poor here. Also with lower taxes definitely comes fewer and poorer quality services, including schools, parks, infrastructure, and much more. I'm not a fan of huge government but it should be responsible for some things and it seems like here everything is sort of left up to the individual. The schools leave a large part of the education up to the parents compared to where I grew up. They have about 30 fundraisers a year, many of which kids can be rewarded with grades for raising money. If your child wants to play a sport middle school or high school I hope you are pretty well off because the parents of players usually fund the building and up keep of athletic fields and other facilities apparently because they can't get any money from the state. Once again if you are coming from the east coast, this may be a joke to you, but the formerly cheap housing of the south is skyrocketing in the heavy growth areas now as well. If you own a business, come on down. If you are just an average Joe, think twice about it.
I feel compelled to address this. I moved away from New England in 1996 because I just couldn't afford to live there. Moving down to Florida, housing prices were much better at the time, but some costs were higher such as gas and food. Once housing prices went haywire, I moved away. So in 2005 I was living in Knoxville. This is the first place I have absolutely thrived. I came with very little, ended up getting divorced, becoming a single mom. There is no way that I would be doing this well if I lived in the northeast.
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