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Old 04-23-2013, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Winchester, TN
5 posts, read 5,655 times
Reputation: 10

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Am moving to Decherd, TN (Franklin County), and there is a "field hydrant" on my property right next to my house. Called the city, and they have no record of it, and neither does the fire department, nor the water utility company. Anyone know what these were used for? (to water crops? to put out fires? for stagecoach stops?) also need to find the darn PUMP for it. Turned it on and ran round the property listening to see if I could HEAR a pump (including under the house) and couldn't find one anywhere. Not complaining, because this may be a source of free water during hard times. Just want more info if anyone has it.
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Old 04-23-2013, 04:23 PM
 
Location: Sullivan County, Tennessee
427 posts, read 893,760 times
Reputation: 393
Is there a creek or pond nearby?

Up here the rural fire departments sometimes install what they call a "dry hydrant". This has an open, screened end submerged in the body of water and a steamer fitting on the top end (like a conventional hydrant) where a semi-rigid suction line can be attached to the fire engine pump. These would be used for filling tankers when there are no nearby pressurized hydrants.

These tend to fall out of use and be forgotten when water districts move in with pressurized hydrants.
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Old 05-03-2013, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Winchester, TN
5 posts, read 5,655 times
Reputation: 10
@Jim37680 - Yes, there is a lake about 300 yards across the street from me. This isn't a dry hydrant used by the fire dept. It's not out at the street, but up next to my home (about 60 foot up a hill from city property, and the fire dept has no record of it. It's about a 2-1/2" steel pipe, comes up 4 foot from the ground with a looped handle at the top that you pull up on to turn it on, then down again to turn it off. It gushes pretty good, is very cold, looks clear, and tastes good (I'm still going to take a sample to the extension office to test though). But I can't find a pump anywhere. Where's the pressure coming from? Think it's possible it goes down to water that is under pressure for some reason, and doesn't need a pump? I know it's rare, but there's a farmer in Grundy County that has one like that.
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Old 05-04-2013, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Sale Creek, TN
3,221 posts, read 2,805,218 times
Reputation: 2965
It sounds like it could be a frost-proof faucet. It would be connected to your water supply. If you are on a utility district, find your meter, look to see if the meter is moving water, then turn the faucet on, run back and check your meter.
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Old 05-05-2013, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Sullivan County, Tennessee
427 posts, read 893,760 times
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I agree with Creekcat that your further description sounds like a "frost-proof" yard hydrant installed to allow year-round access to your domestic water outside the house. Just like fire hydrants, these smaller cousins have a valve located in the earth below the local frost line (you hope anyway) which have a port that will allow them to drain water from above the valve when turned off.

I installed one of these on the farm a few years back (from Lowe's or Home Depot):

Hydrant Lengths | Simmons Manufacturing Company :: Manufacturer of high quality American made water well supplies since 1957

They come in a variety of lengths depending on how deep the local frost line is. Here and probably through most of Tennessee frost line is about 24 inches to be safe. In places like Minnesota and Vermont it may be four feet. You hydrant being four feet tall makes me wonder how long the part below the ground is. All the ones I have seen in stores have a 1" galvanized riser- 2-1/2" sounds unusually large.
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Old 06-07-2013, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Winchester, TN
5 posts, read 5,655 times
Reputation: 10
Creekcat - what a great idea. Will do that as soon as I get back to Decherd. Thanks!

Jim37680 - Yes, 2 1/2" IS large. That's why I got confused... and disappointed. I thought I found a home off the grid, except for electric, which I was also going to do without. Now I found that the "gas" wall heaters are actually electric, it has a well, but the hole has been filled with broken pieces of brick, and the cistern has been filled with dirt, so is unusable. I was also led to believe the wiring was all brand new too, but the only thing new was the breaker box. Now I'm totally unhappy with the property. I used up all my money moving. There are SO many dishonest people out there. I trusted the real estate agent, because she said she was a Christian. Will say anything to sell a house! I'm really bummed. I could just cry...
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Old 06-09-2013, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Sullivan County, Tennessee
427 posts, read 893,760 times
Reputation: 393
Even real estate agents and car salesmen may actually be Christians. But, keep a close eye on them when passing the offering plate. Just joking mostly!

I see the Christian card played a lot in advertising in this area but sadly it doesn't seem to mean much ethically other than as just another tool to gain the other person's confidence.

The filled-in well might still be usable if it is an old hand dug well and if the brick can removed. If it is a narrow bore drilled well then the only way to remove the fill would probably be to re-drill the bore (6"). There may be a good reason the well was abandoned such as contamination or tendency to go dry during dry spells. The presence of a cistern also makes me wonder if the well was ever adequate.
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Old 06-09-2013, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Deane Hill, Knoxville, Tennessee
22,187 posts, read 42,663,351 times
Reputation: 12716
If what you say it true, that the agent misrepresented the property, this is where you need to start.

Tennessee Real Estate Commission - How to File a Complaint
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