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Old 05-25-2017, 12:09 PM
 
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The official stats are in. Middle Tennessee cities continue to be the fastest growing in the state. Murfreesboro is the 10th fastest growing city in the country. Here are the 20 largest cities in Tennessee for 2016 and how much they grew from 2015.

city...2016 pop...change from 2015
  1. Nashville...660,388...5,778
  2. Memphis...652,717...-3,053
  3. Knoxville...186,239...948
  4. Chattanooga...177,571...983
  5. Clarksville...150,287...1,111
  6. Murfreesboro...131,947...5,829
  7. Franklin...74,794...2,155
  8. Jackson...67,005...30
  9. Johnson City...66,677...650
  10. Bartlett...58,622...43
  11. Hendersonville...57,050...1,032
  12. Kingsport...52,806...-208
  13. Collierville...49,177...314
  14. Smyrna...48,596...1,989
  15. Cleveland...44,271...373
  16. Brentwood...42,517...754
  17. Germantown...39,056...-184
  18. Spring Hill...37,731...1,676
  19. Columbia...37,540...740
  20. Gallatin...35,734...1,400
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Last edited by JMT; 05-25-2017 at 05:22 PM..
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Old 05-27-2017, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
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Clarksville appears to have slowed down. Murfreesboro is growing a lot.
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Old 05-28-2017, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Murfreesboro, TN
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Thanks for the data!
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Old 05-28-2017, 04:51 PM
 
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Wow, Gallatin is straight up booming now. I'm not aware of any annexations, but if there truly are none, Gallatin is growing almost as fast as Spring Hill.
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Old 05-28-2017, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Johnson City, TN
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Fairly respectable for Johnson City. Especially considering how the rest of Northeast TN is declining in population. With annexation by ordinance being essentially banned last year we should start seeing numbers better reflective of actual growth/decline rather than cities artificially growing their population by annexing surrounding population centers.
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Old 05-28-2017, 10:27 PM
 
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Top 25 cities cities by numerical growth from 2010-2016:

1) Nashville 59,166
2) Murfreesboro 23,192
3) Clarksville 17,358
4) Franklin 12,307
5) Chattanooga 9,897
6) Mount Juliet 9,592
7) Spring Hill 8,695
8) Smyrna 8,622
9) Knoxville 7,365
10) Memphis 5,828
11) Hendersonville 5,678
12) Brentwood 5,457
13) Gallatin 5,456
14) Collierville 5,212
15) Lebanon 5,127
16) Kingsport 4,601
17) Bartlett 4,009
18) Johnson City 3,525
19) Collegedale 3,155
20) Thompson's Station 3,000
21) Cleveland 2,986
22) Columbia 2,859
23) La Vergne 2,483
24) Cookeville 2,187
25) Sevierville 1,858

15 of the top 25 are in Middle Tennessee (13 of which are in the Nashville MSA). 7 of the top 10. 4 of the top 5.
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Old 05-29-2017, 06:55 AM
 
11,025 posts, read 29,914,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nashvols View Post
Top 25 cities cities by numerical growth from 2010-2016:

1) Nashville 59,166
2) Murfreesboro 23,192
3) Clarksville 17,358
4) Franklin 12,307
5) Chattanooga 9,897
6) Mount Juliet 9,592
7) Spring Hill 8,695
8) Smyrna 8,622
9) Knoxville 7,365
10) Memphis 5,828
11) Hendersonville 5,678
12) Brentwood 5,457
13) Gallatin 5,456
14) Collierville 5,212
15) Lebanon 5,127
16) Kingsport 4,601
17) Bartlett 4,009
18) Johnson City 3,525
19) Collegedale 3,155
20) Thompson's Station 3,000
21) Cleveland 2,986
22) Columbia 2,859
23) La Vergne 2,483
24) Cookeville 2,187
25) Sevierville 1,858

15 of the top 25 are in Middle Tennessee (13 of which are in the Nashville MSA). 7 of the top 10. 4 of the top 5.
I'm curious how many of those cities grew by annexation. I think it was in 2014 when the state made it almost impossible for cities to annex. Prior to that some cities like Lebanon and Kingsport went on annexation sprees which boosted their populations. Memphis's vigorous pursuits of annexations to boost its population have been legendary.

There are a couple of bills making their way through the legislature that will make it easier for neighborhoods to "secede" from cities. One bill is aimed at just big cities and another one will apply to all cities. The mayor of Memphis, I guess seeing the writing on the wall, is now voluntarily coming up with areas his city will de-annex in 2021 (cleverly after the 2020 Census), resulting in further population loss. It's widely assumed that if one of these bills passes, cities such as Kingsport and even Chattanooga could see population losses as recently-annexed areas vote to be de-annexed.

It's almost a shame that Algood didn't merge with Cookeville back in the 1980s when there was a push for that. Algood is surrounded by Cookeville and doesn't even have its own ZIP code. Back then, Algood was floundering and was losing population. Algood is now a veritable boomtown and has grown by 460 just in the last year, none by annexation, and now has a population of 4,193. That means it's grown by 12 percent in just one year which would make it the 2nd fastest growing city in the state last year after Thompson's Station (which really is a boom town). Had Algood merged with Cookeville, today Cookeville would have a population of 36,815 which is a much better reflection of its size.

The same could be said for Maryville-Alcoa which essentially function as one city and have a combined population of 38,577.
__________________


IMPORTANT READING:
Terms of Service

---
its - possession
it's - contraction of it is
your - possession
you're - contraction of you are
their - possession
they're - contraction of they are
there - referring to a place
loose - opposite of tight
lose - opposite of win
who's - contraction of who is
whose - possession

Last edited by JMT; 05-29-2017 at 07:21 AM..
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Old 05-29-2017, 10:12 AM
 
6,310 posts, read 9,551,097 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post
I'm curious how many of those cities grew by annexation. I think it was in 2014 when the state made it almost impossible for cities to annex. Prior to that some cities like Lebanon and Kingsport went on annexation sprees which boosted their populations. Memphis's vigorous pursuits of annexations to boost its population have been legendary.

There are a couple of bills making their way through the legislature that will make it easier for neighborhoods to "secede" from cities. One bill is aimed at just big cities and another one will apply to all cities. The mayor of Memphis, I guess seeing the writing on the wall, is now voluntarily coming up with areas his city will de-annex in 2021 (cleverly after the 2020 Census), resulting in further population loss. It's widely assumed that if one of these bills passes, cities such as Kingsport and even Chattanooga could see population losses as recently-annexed areas vote to be de-annexed.

It's almost a shame that Algood didn't merge with Cookeville back in the 1980s when there was a push for that. Algood is surrounded by Cookeville and doesn't even have its own ZIP code. Back then, Algood was floundering and was losing population. Algood is now a veritable boomtown and has grown by 460 just in the last year, none by annexation, and now has a population of 4,193. That means it's grown by 12 percent in just one year which would make it the 2nd fastest growing city in the state last year after Thompson's Station (which really is a boom town). Had Algood merged with Cookeville, today Cookeville would have a population of 36,815 which is a much better reflection of its size.

The same could be said for Maryville-Alcoa which essentially function as one city and have a combined population of 38,577.
It will be interesting to see how the annexation bills play out.

I'm not opposed to them...but I think there should be a general guideline for development in non-city areas. For example, I think there should be a density requirement in order to maintain unincorporated status. Living in a dense unincorporated area means you enjoy many of the fruits of city life without the consequence of higher taxes.
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Old 05-29-2017, 04:41 PM
 
230 posts, read 155,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nashvols View Post
It will be interesting to see how the annexation bills play out.

I'm not opposed to them...but I think there should be a general guideline for development in non-city areas. For example, I think there should be a density requirement in order to maintain unincorporated status. Living in a dense unincorporated area means you enjoy many of the fruits of city life without the consequence of higher taxes.
Basically, city residents get to subsidize dense unincorporated areas tax burden. Many of residents in Memphis, purchased homes in areas that were in the annex reserve areas and act surprised that they got annexed. They wanted the good benefits of living right outside of the city and out the time being in Shelby County School Systems with a low tax burden. So they took the risk and lost in the end. If you stick your hand close to a fire there's a good chance you will get burned. The 2014 annexation bill pretty much stopped cities abilities to annex unincorporated areas without residents approval, so what's the point of the new annexation bill.

But hey if it's not Nashville the new #1 largest city, it's okay for the state to pass legislation that negatively effect or destabilize Tennessee's other large cities.

More on topic though....I surprised it took this long for Nashville to overtake Memphis in population. Nashville probably passed Memphis back in 2015 in population numbers if not earlier, although the 2020 censuses will clarify by how much.

Although Memphis and Nashville are not an exact apple to apple comparison being that Nashville is merged government, the continuing growth gap should not be ignored. I think having a merged government, is one of the key long term decisions that has benefited Nashville many times over to become what it is today. Memphis can't grow and move forward if the city and county are pulling against each other. It causes stagnation or one slow dragging the other alone for better or worse. It much easier and beneficial to move in the same direction. Add in all the dysfunctional issues along with the fact that larger portion of our metro area is in Arkansas & Mississippi, and Memphis has a long ways to go, to get out of stagnation. Memphis will probably be the permanent #2 Tennessee city in my life time going forward.
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Old 05-29-2017, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Soddy Daisy, TN
218 posts, read 411,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dc1538 View Post
Basically, city residents get to subsidize dense unincorporated areas tax burden. Many of residents in Memphis, purchased homes in areas that were in the annex reserve areas and act surprised that they got annexed. They wanted the good benefits of living right outside of the city and out the time being in Shelby County School Systems with a low tax burden.
On the flip side, a lot of those areas pay for things in the city that they rarely use, like public transportation, theaters, public housing, parks, public art and the likes. It's part of a society, but it goes both ways.
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