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Old 02-09-2020, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
1,058 posts, read 303,721 times
Reputation: 715

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So there are flood control lakes, which my dad calls "watershed dams," on many medium creeks that are tributaries of certain big creeks and small rivers. I've seen them near Jennings Creek (Gainesboro) and Calfkiller River (Sparta/Monterey), plus the occasional small lakes built in or near towns/cities and a bunch in Cumberland County.

Does anyone know how watersheds like the Jennings Creek and Roaring River ones get these dams, and who builds them/how they get permission? I've noticed two more large creeks (Martin Creek and Indian Creek, both in Putnam County) that seem to flood easily in high water and get low easily in droughts, too, and with Martin Creek being by multiple main roads and Indian Creek having an unincorporated town and interstate bridge it could be a serious risk. I'm actually worried because when I went to Gordonsville today, I saw from the interstate that Indian Creek in/near Buffalo Valley is STILL over its banks, and it's going to rain all week.
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Old 02-10-2020, 06:33 AM
Status: "Bias Victim" (set 7 days ago)
 
585 posts, read 308,138 times
Reputation: 1539
T.v.a.?

Last edited by ElDiabloJoe; 02-10-2020 at 06:34 AM.. Reason: C-D autocorrect won't let me capitalize the TLA - 3 letter acronym
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Old 02-10-2020, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Cookeville/Crossville
300 posts, read 308,617 times
Reputation: 248
Don't put a band-aid on a broken arm.
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Old 02-10-2020, 07:23 AM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
12,336 posts, read 15,913,452 times
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I'd start here.
https://www.tn.gov/environment/progr...-by-basin.html
https://www.tn.gov/environment/ask-tdec-form.html
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Old 02-10-2020, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
1,058 posts, read 303,721 times
Reputation: 715
Quote:
Originally Posted by llsmith42 View Post
Don't put a band-aid on a broken arm.
What do you mean by that?

Thanks!
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Old 02-13-2020, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Chattanooga, TN
2,890 posts, read 4,224,896 times
Reputation: 4629
Most of those dams were built many decades ago when environmental rules were more lax. Things are a lot tighter now since the Snail Darter controversy.

It's incredibly difficult to get new impounding dams constructed on any sort of waterway considered to be navigable ("navigable" ~ year-round flow where you can float a rubber duck). Anything that appears as a blue line on USGS quad maps is essentially off limits.

Any attempt will quickly be met with fierce resistance from TDEC and environmental groups who hate all forms of dams. They don't like to interfere with the free flow of rivers because it screws with fish and birds, plus archaeological limitations are much more important now. Pretty much every stream in TN has been declared an archaeologically sensitive area because that's where the prehistoric villages were located.

Your best bet would be a flow-control gate or stormwater retention dam. It doesn't impound any water at normal or low flow. But during periods of high flow it restricts the water to a maximum rate, protecting the downstream areas from flood damage. It also provides land area for temporary water storage upstream. If you can sell the upstream storage area as an environmental conserve / wetland all the better.
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Old 04-13-2020, 03:55 AM
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
1,058 posts, read 303,721 times
Reputation: 715
Quote:
Originally Posted by An Einnseanair View Post
Your best bet would be a flow-control gate or stormwater retention dam. It doesn't impound any water at normal or low flow. But during periods of high flow it restricts the water to a maximum rate, protecting the downstream areas from flood damage. It also provides land area for temporary water storage upstream. If you can sell the upstream storage area as an environmental conserve / wetland all the better.
Ugh. Yeah, thanks. I know of multiple large creeks, two medium creeks and one small river in this area that need some built on some of their tributaries so badly. After getting 4.84 inches of rain yesterday, I bet Big Indian Creek has had yet another nasty flood AGAIN! It's seemingly getting them at least once almost every year now, and multiple times some years; the county could also raise their roads up where they're too low, but Putnam neglects theirs so much that I don't trust/expect them to do that.

TWRA, TVA, the Corp of Engineers or whoever else builds these should talk to some people owning hilly land draining into Big Indian Creek how they'd feel about flow-control gates/stormwater retention dams on small parts of their land. There are some others in this area like Martin Creek, Spring Creek River and both Little Indian Creeks that might not be a bad idea, too (all except Spring Creek River are also very flood-prone, and Spring Creek River has a box culvert here despite its size that would make any flooding risky). In the case of Big Indian, there's even an entire town that could be affected by serious flooding if nothing's done (it happened about 100 years ago)!
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Old 04-14-2020, 11:32 PM
 
Location: Huntsville Area
1,956 posts, read 601,121 times
Reputation: 2998
TVA lakes are limited to the Tennessee River watershed, and they have something like 30 dams. My grandfather worked on Fontana Dam around 1940, and he went in by cog train and didn't come home for 6 months.

The U.S. Army Corp. of Engineers built the dams on the Cumberland River, and they've had a bunch of trouble in recent years with instability of Lake Cumberland and Center Hill Dams. They should have never been built dams on top of limestone caves.

Dams were often products of politics. TVA was formed to provide electricity for the Manhattan Project (nuclear bombs). Dupont had a monopoly on gunpowder so important in times of war. Muscle Shoals' nitrate plant was built as a backup for gunpowder production. Wilson Dam was built to provide electricity to power the government's nitrate plant that later made fertilizers.

After Columbia Dam's snail darter debacle, don't expect to ever see any more dams or large public works projects in Tennessee.
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Old 04-15-2020, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Bellevue
1,201 posts, read 1,509,141 times
Reputation: 876
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun Belt-lover L.A.M. View Post
So there are flood control lakes, which my dad calls "watershed dams," on many medium creeks that are tributaries of certain big creeks and small rivers. I've seen them near Jennings Creek (Gainesboro) and Calfkiller River (Sparta/Monterey), plus the occasional small lakes built in or near towns/cities and a bunch in Cumberland County.

Does anyone know how watersheds like the Jennings Creek and Roaring River ones get these dams, and who builds them/how they get permission? I've noticed two more large creeks (Martin Creek and Indian Creek, both in Putnam County) that seem to flood easily in high water and get low easily in droughts, too, and with Martin Creek being by multiple main roads and Indian Creek having an unincorporated town and interstate bridge it could be a serious risk. I'm actually worried because when I went to Gordonsville today, I saw from the interstate that Indian Creek in/near Buffalo Valley is STILL over its banks, and it's going to rain all week.
https://waterdata.usgs.gov/tn/nwis/current

See if this USGS site helps you find your site. They install & maintain creek & river meters. Sometimes gets difficult to find the stream you need. Some of the data is picked up by the Weather Bureau & Accuweather when & if they issue any flood alerts. Most likely TVA builds the dams with the Corps of Engineers. These days there may be places like golf courses near the creek to let flood whenever water is high.
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Old 04-15-2020, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Huntsville Area
1,956 posts, read 601,121 times
Reputation: 2998
Quote:
Originally Posted by GWoodle View Post
https://waterdata.usgs.gov/tn/nwis/current

See if this USGS site helps you find your site. They install & maintain creek & river meters. Sometimes gets difficult to find the stream you need. Some of the data is picked up by the Weather Bureau & Accuweather when & if they issue any flood alerts. Most likely TVA builds the dams with the Corps of Engineers. These days there may be places like golf courses near the creek to let flood whenever water is high.
Tennessee Valley Authority no longer builds anything. They were once America's largest contractor--building their own power plants and nuclear plants and the electrical lines going to them. Once they figured out they could never cash flow the retirement funds to 33,000 workers, they went out of the building business and annual maintenance and sub-contracted it all to private industry.

The Corp. of Engineers is responsible for operation of TVA's locks on dams on the Tennessee River (and other waterways.) Other than navigation, the Army has no responsibilities on The Rivef.
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