U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Tennessee
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 06-16-2008, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Cumberland Co., TN
11,416 posts, read 11,371,752 times
Reputation: 11655

Advertisements

Your poor son! Ive never seen a reaction like that, just red bumps. Your right about it being a bad yr. for ticks. I wish I had a dollar for every tick we have pulled off this year. Ive treated the yard, the animals and we spray when we are out in the yard, but will still average 4 or 5 each on a good day.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-16-2008, 11:06 AM
 
970 posts, read 1,639,889 times
Reputation: 699
Your son's reaction is similar to mine. I don't just get a bump. The entire area swells up. After a few days the swelling goes down somewhat, but I usually have a huge lump and severe itching for 4-6 weeks afterwards. In the research I've done on ticks and tick disease, I've found that some people are very allergic to the "cement" the ticks inject that holds them to your body, which is what I think causes that reaction in me.

Ticks, even those not carrying disease, can also cause tick paralysis, which usually goes away on its own when the tick is removed.

I agree, this year is a horrible tick season. Some years aren't as bad as others.

daniellefort, that's so strange that you had more ticks when it was dry. It's usually the opposite. There are usually more ticks during a wet season than a dry one. The combination of moisture and heat make for a perfect tick season. My parents' house is a good example. They live in a very dry climate, and for over 25 years had never seen a tick. A couple of years ago when there were so many hurricanes, they got much more rain than usual, and that year you couldn't go out in their yard without getting ticks on you. Last year, during the drought, I had much less of a tick problem than I'm having this year.

There are other factors too though. The amount of wildlife you get in your yard makes a big difference. For example, my yard is full of squirrels. Although I get other wildlife in my yard, squirrels are my biggest source of ticks. When I have a lot of squirrels, I can't even stand on my deck for a few seconds without a tick falling from the tree hanging over the deck, which is the squirrels favorite tree. The squirrels like to play on my front deck too, and I find ticks crawling all over the front deck. A couple of years ago we had a squirrel "shortage". Everyone in the neighborhood wondered what happened to all the squirrels. It was very strange not to see them everywhere. That year I hardly had any ticks. It was wonderful!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-16-2008, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Pleasant Shade Tn
2,214 posts, read 3,743,972 times
Reputation: 522
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnp View Post
Your son's reaction is similar to mine. I don't just get a bump. The entire area swells up. After a few days the swelling goes down somewhat, but I usually have a huge lump and severe itching for 4-6 weeks afterwards. In the research I've done on ticks and tick disease, I've found that some people are very allergic to the "cement" the ticks inject that holds them to your body, which is what I think causes that reaction in me.

Ticks, even those not carrying disease, can also cause tick paralysis, which usually goes away on its own when the tick is removed.

I agree, this year is a horrible tick season. Some years aren't as bad as others.

daniellefort, that's so strange that you had more ticks when it was dry. It's usually the opposite. There are usually more ticks during a wet season than a dry one. The combination of moisture and heat make for a perfect tick season. My parents' house is a good example. They live in a very dry climate, and for over 25 years had never seen a tick. A couple of years ago when there were so many hurricanes, they got much more rain than usual, and that year you couldn't go out in their yard without getting ticks on you. Last year, during the drought, I had much less of a tick problem than I'm having this year.

There are other factors too though. The amount of wildlife you get in your yard makes a big difference. For example, my yard is full of squirrels. Although I get other wildlife in my yard, squirrels are my biggest source of ticks. When I have a lot of squirrels, I can't even stand on my deck for a few seconds without a tick falling from the tree hanging over the deck, which is the squirrels favorite tree. The squirrels like to play on my front deck too, and I find ticks crawling all over the front deck. A couple of years ago we had a squirrel "shortage". Everyone in the neighborhood wondered what happened to all the squirrels. It was very strange not to see them everywhere. That year I hardly had any ticks. It was wonderful!

We have hoards of deer so the problem rests primarily w/ them
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-16-2008, 12:00 PM
 
970 posts, read 1,639,889 times
Reputation: 699
Quote:
Originally Posted by alicenavada View Post
We have hoards of deer so the problem rests primarily w/ them

Yep, hoards of deer could definitely be a problem. They're big carriers of ticks. Areas with field mice are also bad with ticks.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-16-2008, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
447 posts, read 844,879 times
Reputation: 342
A yardful of chickens will keep the ticks at bay ..... 'Course then u have the chicken poop to deal with....
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-16-2008, 03:00 PM
 
Location: BFE
103 posts, read 219,547 times
Reputation: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoAnn5 View Post
A yardful of chickens will keep the ticks at bay ..... 'Course then u have the chicken poop to deal with....
Chicken poop is great for your garden though.....
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-16-2008, 06:55 PM
 
Location: tampa, fl/athens, tn
31 posts, read 94,707 times
Reputation: 16
Default were are they?

Is there a tick season? Are they prevalent in the woods or just in grassy areas? Are there certain areas that are more prone to ticks, or is hit or miss? My land is in Mcminn co, and I walked all around it without any problems... Its is heavily wooded with pines and hardwood, no grass except for some ground cover and some bushes. I plan to go back there in July, should I be concerned?

Thanks,
nkvette
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-16-2008, 08:07 PM
 
970 posts, read 1,639,889 times
Reputation: 699
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkvette View Post
Is there a tick season? Are they prevalent in the woods or just in grassy areas? Are there certain areas that are more prone to ticks, or is hit or miss?
Technically "tick season" is year round in states that are fairly mild during the winter, but there are months where they're not much of a problem where I live. They have 3 different life stages. I start seeing the tiny ones around the first week in April. Depending on the weather I have also seen them late March, but usually where I live it's the first week in April. May and June I start seeing more adults. I usually start seeing a huge decline mid- September. If it's very dry, sometimes I stop seeing them in August, but I consider mid-September my "safe" time to start doing outdoor activities with my dog. We stay in much of the summer because of the ticks. So where I live, I consider April to September to be "tick season".

They're prevalent in woods, but can also be a problem in just grassy areas.

Some areas are more prone to them than others, but mostly it's hit or miss.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-16-2008, 11:04 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California
196 posts, read 434,616 times
Reputation: 108
This is freaking me out. How can my family and I possibly go on a hike without worrying about ticks or have fun in our yard. I am highly considering moving to Cookeville but this is making me have second thoughts. There must be a way to stop the little bastards.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-17-2008, 12:19 AM
 
970 posts, read 1,639,889 times
Reputation: 699
For hikes, cover up well and use repellant, and you should be ok.

You can have your yard treated for ticks. I had granules put down once and they didn't work at all, but having the yard sprayed worked better. But since I have an acre and a half and a bunch of trees, which is where my biggest tick problem is, it costs a fortune and I can't afford to have it done every year. In my area it's recommended twice a year.

A low cost solution is to spray your yard with Ivory dishwashing liquid diluted with water. It really works. Make sure it's the original white Ivory. Some people have had success with other dishwashing liquids for fleas, but for ticks, as far as I know original Ivory is the only one that has been proven for sure to work.

Put it in a garden fertilizer sprayer that you hook up to your hose, and spray it all over your yard. This works great on smaller yards, but you have to do it several times to keep up with new ticks, as it doesn't have a risidual effect after it rains. It's a huge job to do it on the type of yard I have, and all the trees and the two decks. I'm not supposed to be out in the heat for long due to my heart problem, so I wasn't able to keep it up in my yard as often as I should.

Some people don't let the ticks bother them. Most of my neighbors are native Tennesseans, and they don't mind getting covered with ticks. They go out without repellant and pick the ticks off at night. I often hear the parents talk about pulling hundreds of ticks off their kids after an outing, and to them it's no big deal, just a fact of life out here. To me it is a big deal, especially since I've had first-hand experience with tick diseases.

Who knows, you might not even have a tick problem where you want to move to. Not every place in TN is infested with them.

Last edited by themudpuppy; 06-17-2008 at 12:29 AM..
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Tennessee
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top