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Old 01-31-2007, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
117 posts, read 324,799 times
Reputation: 27
Yep, it always warms up a bit when it snows and when it stops, look out!!! The chill hits.. The humidity from the extra moisture in the air is gone.

The first summer I was in South florida, it was soo hot, it was difficult to breath when doing any activity. Unfortunately I moved there in the summertime, not a bright or smart idea.

Though here in MN in the summer it does get hot and high humidity, but never 99% humidity. Literally you could fry an egg on the side walk in FL.

There is no way you can have high humidity with extremely cold temps, but like another writer said, its ones personal perception of what "cold" means.

Just my personal and experienced opinion!
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Old 01-31-2007, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Johnson City, TN
130 posts, read 365,089 times
Reputation: 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbmouse View Post
I guess it is part of getting older????
Thanks for the feedback and replies but I can not attribute our perception of cold to our age in this particular situation. The person with whom I am having this debate is quite a bit older than me (almost elderly) and she'll never move if she hears that the cold is that much worse for people of her advanced age.

Thanks again for the various perspectives...but I think I lost the debate.

Joe
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Old 01-31-2007, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
117 posts, read 324,799 times
Reputation: 27
Well, at least you tried!
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Old 01-31-2007, 09:33 PM
 
6,758 posts, read 6,901,767 times
Reputation: 2920
I think the wind is the only thing I've ever noticed that factors into the "relative" temperature.

I've lived in Mississippi, Texas, and Tennessee, and I can't say any one of the 3 "felt" colder at comparable temperatures.

I think its all in people's mind.
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Old 01-31-2007, 11:29 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
117 posts, read 324,799 times
Reputation: 27
I think you need to come to MN where the high this weekend will be -2, not including wind chill factor, with this it could be -30 to -40 below zero, than you will know what cold is.
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Old 02-01-2007, 04:55 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
21,952 posts, read 16,777,660 times
Reputation: 30921
I think we unconsciously train our bodies for temperature comfort level and that includes humidity. I keep my apartment at 62 degrees all year long and wear short sleeved shirts all year long at home. I happen to like that temperature. I work with people who are wearing long sleeved sweaters and lightweight jackets when the temperature is 68. They have gloves and winter coats on when the temperature is in the 50s when it has to be in the low 30s for me to put on a pair of gloves.

On the other hand, I'm uncomfortable when the temp hits 80 outdoors. Summer is my least favorite season. I couldn't imagine living in Florida. I'm a little concerned about summers in TN. One day when I was there in October it hit 80 and I was hot...in the temperature kind of way.

Do you know people who actually like humidity? I know people who tolerate it better than me but I can't say they like it. I don't actually pay attention to humidity numbers (winter or summer). I just know how I feel (comfortable or uncomfortable) because, I guess, you don't dress for humidity, you dress for temperature.

If you Google these words -- comfort humidity cold -- you'll see some info on the subject.
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Old 02-01-2007, 07:42 AM
 
631 posts, read 1,618,106 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
Do you know people who actually like humidity?
In November, when we went to Florida for our daughters competition, it was in the 50's. All of the natives were wearing jackets. We were wearing shorts and t-shirts.
It did get a little colder when we went to Disney World, so, we made sure that we wore jeans, and lightweight jackets.

As far as humidity, in Florida, it always seemed pretty high, but, after moving to Minnesota, and then, visiting Florida, it didn't seem to bother me as much.
It's not that I like humidity... it's my body.
When we lived in Idaho, which is a drier climate, every Spring, I would get pneumonia.
Since we have moved to Minnesota, I haven't gotten it once, and we've been here for 10 years.

Tennessee's humidity feels the same to me as Minnesota's.
So, I don't think it will bother me much when we finally move.

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Old 02-05-2007, 07:11 PM
 
13 posts, read 38,314 times
Reputation: 16
I couldn't agree more I've driven truck all over the country and experienced many different climates but the cold damp takes the cake. As for the scientific aspect of it I don't know, reminds me of how the weather men in FL put the "FEELS LIKE" temperature on tv next to the actual teperature and the humidity...
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Old 02-05-2007, 07:29 PM
 
1,775 posts, read 5,374,282 times
Reputation: 746
When i lived in N.H. it was a nice day being 45 degrees and only a small jacket needed but 40 in FL is freezing to me. Also when it snowed up north it seemed warmer than when it wan't snowing though the temperature was the same. not sure how that worked but i would rather play out in the snow while it was snowing than when it wasn't. I was up in TN when it was 45 and I was comfortable with it. I'm one of those people who have a 5 degree comfort zone then i'm either hot or cold.
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Old 02-06-2007, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
21,952 posts, read 16,777,660 times
Reputation: 30921
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNBound View Post
In November, when we went to Florida for our daughters competition, it was in the 50's. All of the natives were wearing jackets. We were wearing shorts and t-shirts.
It did get a little colder when we went to Disney World, so, we made sure that we wore jeans, and lightweight jackets.

As far as humidity, in Florida, it always seemed pretty high, but, after moving to Minnesota, and then, visiting Florida, it didn't seem to bother me as much.
It's not that I like humidity... it's my body.
When we lived in Idaho, which is a drier climate, every Spring, I would get pneumonia.
Since we have moved to Minnesota, I haven't gotten it once, and we've been here for 10 years.

Tennessee's humidity feels the same to me as Minnesota's.
So, I don't think it will bother me much when we finally move.

Oooooooh, Minnesota. Did I hear it was Minus Thirty Something Degrees in northern Minnesota, yesterday? (And wind chill had nothing to do with that temperature).
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