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Old 02-13-2007, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Cookeville, TN
60 posts, read 274,776 times
Reputation: 28

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Well, not to dispute you, gentlemen, but I am a lifelong Tennessean and I've seen PLENTY of copperheads! You two must not live in a rural area. We've seen several hiking and even found a dead one on the side of the road in our neighborhood when we were going for a walk one day (and we live in a subdivision). Once when I was a little girl, a man killed a rattlesnake while we were in the mountains one day that was as long as the truck bed - an old farm truck bed! Over 5 ft, a big timber rattler.

Now notice that I said IN THE COUNTRY. If you're in a subdivision in a more populated area, you most likely won't see one. But if you're in a rural area, especially a new subdivision in an area that was recently forest, you could see one. Do you change your life or not move to Tennessee because of a snake? No. But you have to be smart, too, and always be careful if you're flipping over a rock or board, where snakes like to hide.
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Old 02-13-2007, 03:59 PM
 
11,030 posts, read 29,924,048 times
Reputation: 7433
Quote:
Originally Posted by KC38506 View Post
Well, not to dispute you, gentlemen, but I am a lifelong Tennessean and I've seen PLENTY of copperheads! You two must not live in a rural area. We've seen several hiking and even found a dead one on the side of the road in our neighborhood when we were going for a walk one day (and we live in a subdivision). Once when I was a little girl, a man killed a rattlesnake while we were in the mountains one day that was as long as the truck bed - an old farm truck bed! Over 5 ft, a big timber rattler.

Now notice that I said IN THE COUNTRY. If you're in a subdivision in a more populated area, you most likely won't see one. But if you're in a rural area, especially a new subdivision in an area that was recently forest, you could see one. Do you change your life or not move to Tennessee because of a snake? No. But you have to be smart, too, and always be careful if you're flipping over a rock or board, where snakes like to hide.
I'm not disputing you, either. But I do a LOT of camping and hiking and have probably spend a couple of hundred nights out in the woods and mountains in the last 30 years, including a lot of primitive camping (not campgrounds). I have never seen a copperhead or a rattler. Maybe I was just blind and got lucky. But that was my experience.
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Old 02-13-2007, 04:49 PM
 
Location: at the foot of my mountain
459 posts, read 1,059,208 times
Reputation: 205
Wink Just One

Quote:
Originally Posted by livefromwi View Post
Are there mosquitoes in TN? or what other bugs and animals are common and troublesome?
Just transplanted Yankees, lol.
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Old 02-13-2007, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Maine
71 posts, read 219,809 times
Reputation: 52
Default Snakes and insects

I've seen copperheads, rattlers, and water moccassins, too. During the warm season, I am ALWAYS watching out for them.

You need to watch for ticks, too, of course. The small deer ticks are really hard to see sometimes.

Mosquitoes seem to be pretty rare in the two places I have lived, though, and only 1 or 2 appear each season. The TVA used to control them by raising and lowering the water levels of the rivers to kill the larvae. It got rid of most mosquitoes and malaria in the region, and now perhaps the birds, frogs, and toads keep them under control. It makes summer evenings very pleasant.
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Old 02-13-2007, 05:25 PM
 
11,030 posts, read 29,924,048 times
Reputation: 7433
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsimmu View Post
Just transplanted Yankees, lol.
Now THAT is funny!

But in all seriousness, as other people have said, chiggers are something to watch out for. In other words, wear long socks. And it's always a good idea to wear a cap while you're out in the woods to keep ticks from getting into your hair.
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Old 02-13-2007, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
117 posts, read 417,823 times
Reputation: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkmewright View Post
Here's a cool link for you:
http://www.cicadamania.com/gallery.html
Thanks for the website, i didn't know there were such insects, thanks for the info!
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Old 02-15-2007, 09:17 PM
 
Location: WI, USA
19 posts, read 138,572 times
Reputation: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickadee View Post
I've seen copperheads, rattlers, and water moccassins, too. During the warm season, I am ALWAYS watching out for them.

You need to watch for ticks, too, of course. The small deer ticks are really hard to see sometimes.

Mosquitoes seem to be pretty rare in the two places I have lived, though, and only 1 or 2 appear each season. The TVA used to control them by raising and lowering the water levels of the rivers to kill the larvae. It got rid of most mosquitoes and malaria in the region, and now perhaps the birds, frogs, and toads keep them under control. It makes summer evenings very pleasant.
Thank you very much. I'm glad to hear about the low mosquito population. Living in WI there's quite a lot, so it'd be nice to live somewhere where there aren't that many.
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Old 02-16-2007, 10:08 AM
 
Location: US
3,044 posts, read 3,112,921 times
Reputation: 1579
Default Spiders & Snakes

>>I think that people who are hysterical over--horrors--a few mosquitos or garden snakes should just give up and live in a high-rise somewhere and not bother with a beautiful place like Tennessee which I'm convinced God designed for people who love the outdoors.<<

Actually, I was raised on a 40 acre horse and sheep farm in Ohio. I spent my summers bailing hay and riding my horse, Sloe Joe. We trained over the spring and summer for barrel racing at the state fair, which we did every year, and he was the best. He put up with me since I was a little kid. I remember one year when I was ten, Joe was for some reason afraid to get into the trailer to go to the fair. My dad was whipping the heck out of him. My mom and I were standing in the kitchen watching in tears. I ran out the door and stood between Joe and my dad to stop him,and I walked and rode Joe to the fair that year. My dad sold him when we moved to Florida, mosquito/bug/flea/roach capital of the world. My hubby will be thrilled about snakes. It's a big happy ordeal (for him) when we find one in our yard. I too am convinced God created mountains to show us a little of His Majesty and, if all this can be worked out, am looking forward to standing among them, and giving my son the opportunity to really love horses instead of video games.

Carol - Yankee turned Cracker against my will
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Old 02-16-2007, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Branson Area
880 posts, read 2,431,719 times
Reputation: 703
Check out:
http://frogsandsnakes.homestead.com/snakes.html

You can google for snakes in Tennesee and get all sorts of info. All states have snakes, spiders, etc. You usually just run into them in more rural areas than in the city. Mostly it's a matter of respect and information. If you know where they hang out, you can be careful.
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Old 02-17-2007, 12:43 AM
 
3 posts, read 19,515 times
Reputation: 10
i see about 2-3 copperheads and rattle snakes a year(but i am actually looking for them) and they have never tried to bite me unless i got to close so just dont mess with it(DONT KILL IT!!) i have never saw and brown recluse spiders or black widows spiders in east TN and believe me i have looked. some people say the have a problem with scorpions but the scorpions here Plain Eastern Stripeless Scorpion (Vaejovis carolinianus) and the Striped Scorpion (Centruroides vittatus) arent really all that dangerous unless you are allergic to the venom.but i doubt you have any real problems with anything like this if you live in the city
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