U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Tennessee
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-11-2007, 07:49 PM
 
197 posts, read 969,633 times
Reputation: 55

Advertisements

Hi everybody....lot's of houses I was looking in the internet have septic system, even new houses in nice areas....it's kinda tough for me to accept that....sorry.....city guy here. Perhaps I should be that concerned. It appears that a system can go several years if you use it correctly, but you have to watch closely. Comments ?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-11-2007, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
6,290 posts, read 21,142,237 times
Reputation: 1668
It depends. Some soils are better than others for a septic system. Also, some systems can be affected by heavy rains.

It's probably okay. Most locales required a "perk test" to be done prior to installing a system (I've done a few tests myself working for engineering firms).

You don't really have to "watch it". It'll either work, or you'll begin to have trouble with it. You'll probably notice it first when a toilet doesn't flush as quickly as it once did.

I like being on a sewer line, but a house with a septic system wouldn't be a "deal killer" for me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2007, 08:05 PM
 
12,080 posts, read 33,589,839 times
Reputation: 8895
Quote:
Originally Posted by alleycat View Post
It depends. Some soils are better than others for a septic system. Also, some systems can be affected by heavy rains.

It's probably okay. Most locales required a "perk test" to be done prior to installing a system (I've done a few tests myself working for engineering firms).

You don't really have to "watch it". It'll either work, or you'll begin to have trouble with it. You'll probably notice it first when a toilet doesn't flush as quickly as it once did.

I like being on a sewer line, but a house with a septic system wouldn't be a "deal killer" for me.
That's very true. And I've heard of people on sewer systems who have had sewer problems.

My parents had a septic tank for 22 years and never once had a problem with it. Just make sure you use Rid-Ex every month or so and you should be fine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2007, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Northern CA but can't wait to get out!
203 posts, read 709,216 times
Reputation: 86
We moved from the "city" to a house in the "country" with a septic system 11 years ago. Until then I didn't even know they existed. We've never had any trouble with it. We have it pumped every 4 or 5 years and it's all good. I would prefer to be on a sewer line, but certainly wouldn't pass up a great house because of a septic system.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2007, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
6,290 posts, read 21,142,237 times
Reputation: 1668
By the way, hoosier, if you buy a house and decide to add on to it later, you will probably have to add to the septic field if the addition is a bedroom or bathroom. Some counties will require it.

It's not a big thing, I just thought I'd let you know.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2007, 09:45 PM
 
197 posts, read 969,633 times
Reputation: 55
Thanks for the replies. How is it pumped ? I assume you call a specialized company and they arrive with a tank truck to do the job. Is it messy ? Do they have to remove the whole tank top ? How much $$ ? How long time does it take ? I'm asking because I found a new subdivison in Morristown, TN with nice houses but they're on septic because it's in the country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2007, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
6,290 posts, read 21,142,237 times
Reputation: 1668
Yeah, there are companies who do this (better them than me). They are called "honey dippers" if you can believe it. They don't have to take the top off; there is no top to take off generally, there is an access hole. It's not messy . . . just a bit smelly. It doesn't take that long.

I'm not sure what it cost.

You may not even have to do this.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2007, 10:59 PM
 
408 posts, read 1,822,417 times
Reputation: 132
My parent's had theirs pumped a couple of years ago. Before that time it had been about 20 years since the last time it was pumped. Though the length of time will depend on how big the tank is. There was no odor when it was pumped.
The guy they had out didn't charge as much if you do the digging yourself. I want to say the price without the digging charge was around $100. I'm not 100% sure though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2007, 11:54 PM
 
77 posts, read 278,812 times
Reputation: 150
I prefer septic systems......No problems here..
They are sized as per how many bedrooms & bathrooms per house.

As with city sewer, you pay for every drop of water you use even if just washing the car, & water runs down the road.. YOU STILL PAY.........
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2007, 12:19 AM
 
166 posts, read 577,555 times
Reputation: 71
Default Septic systems

Septics are very common in towns and rural areas of PA as well. They're fairly maintenance free but there are a few things you need to be careful with. Don't use draino or other things that can kill the bacteria that do the 'work' in your septic tank. There are certain 'septic-safe' drain products, sold by Home Depot, Lowes, etc. that won't harm the bacteria. Next, be careful what you put down your drain. There are things that people shouldn't put down their drains but do, like grease, etc. which aren't good for any sewer system but can be hazardous to a septic system, as it can get into the field and prevent the liquids from going down. Some septic pros recommend adding a spoonful of brewers yeast or something similar in order to promote the bacteria necessary to keep the system fully effective. As for pumping, that depends on the size of the household and its usage, but generally should be done anywhere from 2 (for heavy usage) to five years. Reason is you don't want solids getting into the field from the holding tank, since, like grease,etc, it can create blockages in the system. Most newer systems will have an alarm that will sound in the house if there's a problem. If there's no alarm or it's not working, generally the lines will back up into the tub, sinks, etc. You have to be really far along with a problem to get to that point.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Tennessee
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top