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Old 02-22-2007, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Deane Hill, Knoxville, Tennessee
21,626 posts, read 30,599,066 times
Reputation: 11691
Sevier County has Gatlinburg, which is wet. Henry's Crossroad's is something that you pulled off a map. It is a fork in the road. So people in Pigeon Forge go to Gatlinburg to get a drink. Yeah. What is your point?

You said something previously about how the dry laws are pointless and started by the Baptists. I drink and am not a Baptist. So what? Apparently you have a beef with the dry laws. Okay. You are Jewish and will be a professor at Maryville College and apparently you don't like the laws. That's fine, but what is your agenda? Your previous posts were deleted about this issue. I would have like to discuss this issue.

I don't know what you are driving at. You don't like the laws?
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Old 02-22-2007, 08:54 PM
 
8,986 posts, read 20,920,918 times
Reputation: 5732
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elrod View Post
You have to consider all the exceptions too. Sevier County may be dry but I don't think Gatlinburg is. There's a winery there! I don't know about Pigeon Forge or Sevierville. In a lot of these counties, the towns are wet but the surrounding counties are dry. The net effect is nil because there are virtually no restaurants outside the town limits, period.
Believe it or not, having a winery in the county doesn't necessarily mean it'll be wet or dry. Don't forget that Moore County (Lynchburg) is dry, even though the largest employer is Jack Daniels. That means that even though Jack Daniels whiskey is made in Moore County, you have to drive to another county to buy it. How ridiculous is that??

But generally when one says "dry county" it refers to package stores, not restaurants and not beer. Many towns in Tennessee allow liquor by the drink but do not allow package stores.
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Old 02-22-2007, 08:54 PM
 
60 posts, read 255,432 times
Reputation: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by hiknapster View Post
Sevier County has Gatlinburg, which is wet. Henry's Crossroad's is something that you pulled off a map. It is a fork in the road. So people in Pigeon Forge go to Gatlinburg to get a drink. Yeah. What is your point?

You said something previously about how the dry laws are pointless and started by the Baptists. I drink and am not a Baptist. So what? Apparently you have a beef with the dry laws. Okay. You are Jewish and will be a professor at Maryville College and apparently you don't like the laws. That's fine, but what is your agenda? Your previous posts were deleted about this issue. I would have like to discuss this issue.

I don't know what you are driving at. You don't like the laws?
I'm not sure what you're sensitive about. I don't have any "agenda." I admit I don't like dry laws. I simply see them as oppressive: if you don't want to drink, don't drink. Fortunately, dry laws are starting to go by the wayside in many places, often because restaurant chains won't do business in dry areas. And where I am moving will not be dry so I don't really care what neighboring counties or communities decided to do.

My point was simply that dry county laws don't really have any material effect on alcohol consumption, unless they are completely surrounded by other dry places. Southern Kentucky is such a place. You have to drive for a long time to buy booze. I did pick Henry's Crossroads from a map to make the point: it's a rural place and if you lived there and wanted a drink, you didn't have to go very far to get alcohol. Thus, the purpose of the laws - to restrict sales of alchohol and, presumably, consumption of it too - didn't seem to have much effect.
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Old 02-22-2007, 09:43 PM
 
8,986 posts, read 20,920,918 times
Reputation: 5732
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elrod View Post
I'm not sure what you're sensitive about. I don't have any "agenda." I admit I don't like dry laws. I simply see them as oppressive: if you don't want to drink, don't drink. Fortunately, dry laws are starting to go by the wayside in many places, often because restaurant chains won't do business in dry areas. And where I am moving will not be dry so I don't really care what neighboring counties or communities decided to do.

My point was simply that dry county laws don't really have any material effect on alcohol consumption, unless they are completely surrounded by other dry places. Southern Kentucky is such a place. You have to drive for a long time to buy booze. I did pick Henry's Crossroads from a map to make the point: it's a rural place and if you lived there and wanted a drink, you didn't have to go very far to get alcohol. Thus, the purpose of the laws - to restrict sales of alchohol and, presumably, consumption of it too - didn't seem to have much effect.
I don't see how dry laws are oppressive if that's what the majority of the people want. There are plenty of places in the country where you can buy packaged liquor to your heart's content. If the good people of Southern Kentucky decided that they don't want it, that's their prerogative.

I personally don't understand why it's ok for a restaurant to serve liquor but it's not ok for a store to sell it by the bottle. But hey, it's what the people want and have continued to prove through countless elections throughout the years.
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Old 02-22-2007, 10:03 PM
 
60 posts, read 255,432 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post
I don't see how dry laws are oppressive if that's what the majority of the people want. There are plenty of places in the country where you can buy packaged liquor to your heart's content. If the good people of Southern Kentucky decided that they don't want it, that's their prerogative.

I personally don't understand why it's ok for a restaurant to serve liquor but it's not ok for a store to sell it by the bottle. But hey, it's what the people want and have continued to prove through countless elections throughout the years.
Well, the majority can act oppressively. It's not hard to cite examples of it. But the 21st Amendment allows localities to pass laws on it so there's nothing unconstitutional about a state or locality banning alcohol. I just think no community in America should use the law to ban the sale of alcohol. If you don't want to drink, don't drink.

Your second point actually reveals quite a bit about why so many semi-dry laws are in place: corruption. Sheriffs in some dry counties get payoffs from moonshiners who sell bottled illegal liquor in lieu of legally sold packaged booze. Restaurants, on the other hand, are unlikely to sell bootleg liquor. So the perfect solution is to keep packaged liquor illegal so as to keep the graft flowing in from moonshiners but allow restaurants to sell alcohol and make a reasonable profit.

But on the election issue, dry laws having been falling at record numbers in the last ten years. In southern Kentucky, east Tennessee and elsewhere throughout the South, dry laws are getting on the ballot and, to the shock of many old-timers, starting to get repealed in referenda. A big reason for this is that Wal-Mart (which sells beer and wine in many places) and restaurant chains like Applebee's have heavily lobbied local governments across the South to repeal their dry laws. These companies make HUGE profits on alcohol sales. These companies are able to get repeal laws on the ballot, and they're able to drum up support for repeal in the community.

If you look at the Kentucky dry/wet county map, it is much "wetter" now than it was five years ago. Most of the newly non-dry counties are "moist," which means they can serve in restaurants only. And many of these moist counties are exurban counties around Lexington and Bowling Green where Wal-Mart and Applebee's etc. do big business.
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Old 05-22-2007, 09:55 AM
 
9 posts, read 31,075 times
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I agree with you! I moved from Miami FL. to PSL florida which is 2 hours north. Still not quiet enough for us. My son graduates next year and we are looking for a good small private, conservative christian college. His Major will be in HIstory/law/political Science. We are looking in EASt TN. We are looking for a DRY, SAFE, RURAL town with no night life. We would also like to enjoy snow in our own back yard if at all possible in TN. Any suggestions on which East TN counties/Towns would fit our needs? (Snow/ Mountains/Dry/Safe/NO night life/ hymn singing/bible preaching small old fashioned churches)? not all of us who move from Florida to TN are looking for the same things we are leaving behind. We will truly welcome the Culture schock! as a amtter of fact we are looking forward to it.
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Old 05-22-2007, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Central Florida
62 posts, read 257,968 times
Reputation: 42
Sevier County is a 'dry' county. What ever that means. Had NO idea that was the case when we moved here, though. You CAN buy beer here in grocery stores, corner gas station stores and now Wal-Mart. There is beer in many restaurants, they have to be 'so far' away from a church or place of worship. But no wine or liquors.

I personally don't mind one way or the other. I just go to the next county to buy the wine I want. What I find strange is that there are 2 wineries that I know of in Sevier County. You can BUY their wine in their shops. That is weird I think. My husband and I just chuckle when we make the 'trek' to the wine store and buy it in the box so that is last longer.
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Old 05-28-2007, 04:53 PM
GFG
 
11 posts, read 32,581 times
Reputation: 17
Seems to me that you have an obsession with having alcohol at your every demand. If its that important maybe you should start your own country. So your going to be a pharmacist? I guess restricting the sale of drugs is retarded? Maybe you should seek another profession or better than that maybe the DEA and the local law enforcement needs to keep a real close eye on you. You are coming from Florida but you sound like the Da** Yankees coming here telling us how it should be. If you don't like it the way it is here then stay where you are.
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Old 05-29-2007, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
4,739 posts, read 5,394,518 times
Reputation: 2913
The wine and cheese place is visable from I-40 at the Jamestown exit, also beer is sold about everywhere, and there are several bootleggers that sell name brand liquor out of their homes in Crossville.
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Old 06-21-2007, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Orlando, Florida
4 posts, read 39,668 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by hjlacey View Post
Seirver Co., and Hawkins Co. are 2 dry counties although you can buy alcoholic beverages in Hawkins Co. but do not serve in restaurants.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CG&D93 View Post
Sevier County is a 'dry' county. What ever that means. Had NO idea that was the case when we moved here, though. You CAN buy beer here in grocery stores, corner gas station stores and now Wal-Mart. There is beer in many restaurants, they have to be 'so far' away from a church or place of worship. But no wine or liquors.

I personally don't mind one way or the other. I just go to the next county to buy the wine I want. What I find strange is that there are 2 wineries that I know of in Sevier County. You can BUY their wine in their shops. That is weird I think. My husband and I just chuckle when we make the 'trek' to the wine store and buy it in the box so that is last longer.
I live in Orlando, Florida, but I visit Tennessee frequently because I have friends and relatives there. I hate to refer to any members here as liars, but I do know for a fact Sevier County is not dry because I have purchased wine and mixed drinks at restaurants in Gatlinburg, and I know of two liquor stores in Gatlinburg as well. It may be a moist or limited county as opposed to a truly wet county, but Sevier County is by no means completely dry. I KNOW the following restaurants in Gatlinburg serve mixed drinks and wine because I've purchased it there: Park Grill, Hard Rock Cafe, TGI Friday's, and Ruby Tuesday's.

Of course, there is a lot more to Sevier County than merely the city of Gatlinburg.
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