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Old 04-05-2007, 07:19 PM
 
11 posts, read 48,906 times
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We live in the mountains of the Cumberland for the past two years. What's the common snake variety in the Cumberland Plateau? Timber Rattlers! Big Ones. We have cats and they will take on a snake every chance they get. In the many rock structures found on the mountains, the cats will get the snakes to come out and my husband gets his target practice in. I'm just glad he is a good shout and hasn't hit the cat. If the cat looses the battle my husband just says "Get another cat". Hope this helps. It is not easy living in the mountains, but we like it.
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Old 04-05-2007, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Lakes & Mountains of East TN
3,454 posts, read 6,436,503 times
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To put it in perspective, our 14 foot Burmese Python eats 10 lb rabbits. He's 14 feet long and as thick as my thigh (that's thick! lol). Our cats (8-10 lbs) walk past his cage constantly and he pays them no attention at all. But if we have a rabbit even in the next room he starts restlessly pacing in his cage. Rodents have a distinct smell and it drives snakes crazy with desire!

Anyway, I guess a snake that size could be a threat to a cat. But I doubt you'll find snakes that size in Tennessee.

A 9 foot Boa Constrictor eats jumbo rats or small bunnies (1-2 lbs).

Our 4 foot long Ball Python eats large rats (less than a pound).

Snakes won't kill food they can't eat; unless someone knows of a giant snake native to the area, your cats are safe from snakes, constrictors anyway.

Most local snakes are a couple feet long and eat mice, rats, squirrels, etc. I know some rat snakes and whatnot get longer but they still eat small stuff. Corn snakes and such are long, and eat a lot--but they eat many small prey, not one big one.

On the other hand, if you're talking about poisonous snakes (we have rattlers and copperheads up here), that's another ball game entirely. And the cats would be the least of your worries, if there were a lot of venomous snakes around...but I don't believe they're that common.
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Old 04-06-2007, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Another Day Closer
13,905 posts, read 2,916,426 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bbkaren View Post
To put it in perspective, our 14 foot Burmese Python eats 10 lb rabbits. He's 14 feet long and as thick as my thigh (that's thick! lol). Our cats (8-10 lbs) walk past his cage constantly and he pays them no attention at all. But if we have a rabbit even in the next room he starts restlessly pacing in his cage. Rodents have a distinct smell and it drives snakes crazy with desire!

Anyway, I guess a snake that size could be a threat to a cat. But I doubt you'll find snakes that size in Tennessee.

A 9 foot Boa Constrictor eats jumbo rats or small bunnies (1-2 lbs).

Our 4 foot long Ball Python eats large rats (less than a pound).

Snakes won't kill food they can't eat; unless someone knows of a giant snake native to the area, your cats are safe from snakes, constrictors anyway.

Most local snakes are a couple feet long and eat mice, rats, squirrels, etc. I know some rat snakes and whatnot get longer but they still eat small stuff. Corn snakes and such are long, and eat a lot--but they eat many small prey, not one big one.

On the other hand, if you're talking about poisonous snakes (we have rattlers and copperheads up here), that's another ball game entirely. And the cats would be the least of your worries, if there were a lot of venomous snakes around...but I don't believe they're that common.

How about it guys? What snakes are common to TN. Especially middle southern TN, which is where I'm headed to.
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Old 04-06-2007, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Poisonous? Mostly copperheads. In a few locations there are rattlers (I've never seen one in the wild in my entire life in upper Middle Tennessee) and water moccasins/cottonmouths. Water moccasins are my least favorite snakes of all . . . if I see a snake on the water, they can have it. "This pond ain't bigger enough for both of us . . . it's all yours!" ;-)
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Old 04-06-2007, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Another Day Closer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alleycat View Post
Poisonous? Mostly copperheads. In a few locations there are rattlers (I've never seen one in the wild in my entire life in upper Middle Tennessee) and water moccasins/cottonmouths. Water moccasins are my least favorite snakes of all . . . if I see a snake on the water, they can have it. "This pond ain't bigger enough for both of us . . . it's all yours!" ;-)
I know what you mean about the water moccasins/cottonmouths. We have them here. When we were kids we used to fish for Horn Pout down on the tracks at night with a fire or a lantern. The light would draw them out of the water onto the tracks. They would also come up to the boat when we had a lantern lit. We would always be beating them over the head with oars and such. Never thought a thing about it. Grew up doing it. It was just what you did. Noooottttt so much today.
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Old 04-06-2007, 11:40 AM
 
Location: On the plateau, TN
15,205 posts, read 10,306,931 times
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Tennessee snakes


http://frogsandsnakes.homestead.com/snakes.html
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Old 04-06-2007, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Another Day Closer
13,905 posts, read 2,916,426 times
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Originally Posted by Bones View Post

Thanks for the link Bones. This is great. I am now educated on Tennesse snakes. It is an excellent website for anyone wanting to know about TN snakes
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Old 04-06-2007, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Chattanooga
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we have a cat that likes to eat snakes...is that going to be a problem?
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Old 04-06-2007, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Tri-Cities
64 posts, read 216,000 times
Reputation: 21
Thanks for posting the link, Bones. Those copperheads & rattlers sure are pretty, but I hope I don't see one close up & personal.
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Old 04-06-2007, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
117 posts, read 432,890 times
Reputation: 28
Ok, but what about the spiders? Is their a website for the spiders that are in TN?
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