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Old 04-08-2007, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
6,290 posts, read 20,552,891 times
Reputation: 1666

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hiknapster View Post
I will eat everyone's coleslaw!
I like cole slaw. I just don't want it put on top of a barbeque sandwich.

Last edited by alleycat; 04-08-2007 at 03:51 PM..
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Old 04-13-2007, 05:59 AM
 
Location: Central Illinois
15 posts, read 50,666 times
Reputation: 12
Talking Black-Eyed Peas!

Haven't seen these mentioned here. When I was growing up in TN there was a tradition that you'd have good luck all year if you had black-eyed peas and hog jowl on New Year's Day.
I was an adult before I ever heard an explanation for that, but in the interest of useless trivia, here's what I heard...
When Sherman's troops were marching through the South, they were destroying food crops and livestock as they went. Black-eyed peas were known to them as "cowpeas", so they thought only cows ate them and didn't bother to destroy them. The locals ate them. The hog jowls apparently came from attempts to not waste any part of the livestock remains. So a meal of black-eyed peas and hog jowls was like a 19th-century "survival meal", helping the Southerners avoid starvation. It wasn't a far cry, then, for them to adopt the combination as a good luck tradition.
I've never been a hog jowl aficionado (how's THAT for a phrase?) but I LOVE those black-eyed peas!
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Old 04-13-2007, 06:09 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
6,290 posts, read 20,552,891 times
Reputation: 1666
My mother has to have black-eyed peas for New Years every year.

Strangely enough, I've never heard an explanation for it, or really even thought about it.
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Old 04-13-2007, 07:05 AM
 
3,893 posts, read 9,364,169 times
Reputation: 3042
We did too. Her family was from Oklahoma. Hmmmmmm....
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Old 04-13-2007, 08:03 AM
 
11,604 posts, read 31,783,697 times
Reputation: 8203
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZCatcher View Post
Haven't seen these mentioned here. When I was growing up in TN there was a tradition that you'd have good luck all year if you had black-eyed peas and hog jowl on New Year's Day.
I was an adult before I ever heard an explanation for that, but in the interest of useless trivia, here's what I heard...
When Sherman's troops were marching through the South, they were destroying food crops and livestock as they went. Black-eyed peas were known to them as "cowpeas", so they thought only cows ate them and didn't bother to destroy them. The locals ate them. The hog jowls apparently came from attempts to not waste any part of the livestock remains. So a meal of black-eyed peas and hog jowls was like a 19th-century "survival meal", helping the Southerners avoid starvation. It wasn't a far cry, then, for them to adopt the combination as a good luck tradition.
I've never been a hog jowl aficionado (how's THAT for a phrase?) but I LOVE those black-eyed peas!
That delicious dish is called Hoppin' John, and it's a tradition throughout the South to eat it on New Year's Day. But it started well before the Civil War, the earliest recorded mention of it was in 1830. In many Southern homes it's also served with a bowl of collard greens which is supposed to bring wealth in the new year.

According to Southern Living:

"Hoppin' John is one of those Southern culinary icons that seem so simple, yet upon closer inspection bloom with layers of history, lore, and tradition. The hearty combination first emerged on Lowcountry rice plantations. Abundant Carolina Gold rice and field peas re-created the rice-and-pigeon pea combination familiar to West African slaves, who were hungry for the comforting flavors of their homeland. Good food travels fast, and soon this stick-to-your-ribs specialty made its way out of the fields and into kitchens throughout the South.

"As for lore, well, there are as many stories regarding the origin of the name Hoppin' John as there are tributaries flowing into the Mississippi. One of the more popular theories suggests it's a Southernization of pois pigeon (pwah ah pee-ZHAN), which is French for pigeon pea.

"Tradition holds that when eaten on New Year's Day, Hoppin' John brings good luck. The rice signifies abundance for the coming year, while peas-specifically black-eyed peas-are thought to bring wealth in the form of coins. (Collard greens, a classic Hoppin' John partner, represent dollar bills.) Pork also plays an important role in the dish, and it's for more than just flavor. Hogs can't look back, so pork represents the future."
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Old 04-13-2007, 04:28 PM
 
284 posts, read 1,542,082 times
Reputation: 190
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZCatcher View Post
Haven't seen these mentioned here. When I was growing up in TN there was a tradition that you'd have good luck all year if you had black-eyed peas and hog jowl on New Year's Day.
I was an adult before I ever heard an explanation for that, but in the interest of useless trivia, here's what I heard...
When Sherman's troops were marching through the South, they were destroying food crops and livestock as they went. Black-eyed peas were known to them as "cowpeas", so they thought only cows ate them and didn't bother to destroy them. The locals ate them. The hog jowls apparently came from attempts to not waste any part of the livestock remains. So a meal of black-eyed peas and hog jowls was like a 19th-century "survival meal", helping the Southerners avoid starvation. It wasn't a far cry, then, for them to adopt the combination as a good luck tradition.
I've never been a hog jowl aficionado (how's THAT for a phrase?) but I LOVE those black-eyed peas!
Love your folklore! This must be why I've had to eat black-eyed peas on New Year's my whole life despite hating them and not being superstitious. My TN ancestors are to blame for my New Year's suffering. LOL Enjoyed your post!
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Old 04-13-2007, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
14,506 posts, read 23,188,178 times
Reputation: 8832
Default interesting--

Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post
That delicious dish is called Hoppin' John, and it's a tradition throughout the South to eat it on New Year's Day. But it started well before the Civil War, the earliest recorded mention of it was in 1830. In many Southern homes it's also served with a bowl of collard greens which is supposed to bring wealth in the new year.

According to Southern Living:

"Hoppin' John is one of those Southern culinary icons that seem so simple, yet upon closer inspection bloom with layers of history, lore, and tradition. The hearty combination first emerged on Lowcountry rice plantations. Abundant Carolina Gold rice and field peas re-created the rice-and-pigeon pea combination familiar to West African slaves, who were hungry for the comforting flavors of their homeland. Good food travels fast, and soon this stick-to-your-ribs specialty made its way out of the fields and into kitchens throughout the South.

"As for lore, well, there are as many stories regarding the origin of the name Hoppin' John as there are tributaries flowing into the Mississippi. One of the more popular theories suggests it's a Southernization of pois pigeon (pwah ah pee-ZHAN), which is French for pigeon pea.

"Tradition holds that when eaten on New Year's Day, Hoppin' John brings good luck. The rice signifies abundance for the coming year, while peas-specifically black-eyed peas-are thought to bring wealth in the form of coins. (Collard greens, a classic Hoppin' John partner, represent dollar bills.) Pork also plays an important role in the dish, and it's for more than just flavor. Hogs can't look back, so pork represents the future."

My grandmother on my Dads side (she was born 1898) was from baltimore and always told us we he to eat lentils on New Years- for good luck
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Old 04-13-2007, 09:02 PM
 
Location: PA
25 posts, read 88,845 times
Reputation: 12
What are hog jowls?
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Old 04-13-2007, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Beautiful East TN!!
7,281 posts, read 18,708,212 times
Reputation: 2750
Exactly what you are thinking!. Hahahahaha I know, you were hoping it meant something else but no.....it is the pigs jaw, the fatty part, supposedly taste like bacon.
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Old 04-14-2007, 02:41 AM
 
Location: Seattle
6,486 posts, read 13,786,111 times
Reputation: 2764
I like me a bit of hog jaw, but not enough to eat it more'n just on New Year's! But I do eat black-eyed peas here and there through the year.
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