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Old 04-06-2007, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Beautiful East TN!!
7,281 posts, read 18,705,867 times
Reputation: 2750

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Just to add to your great post. The Johnson City figures also include some annexing that happened last year. Pinney Flats and about 3 more square miles worth of Gray.




Quote:
Originally Posted by JMT View Post
New Census figures have been released for 2006 population estimates. I think it's interesting to see where the growth is taking place in Tennessee metropolitan and micropolitan areas.

I'm using figures for some of the cities and towns mentioned more frequently in this forum.

Chattanooga added 20,173 people with a 2006 population of 496,704.
Clarksville added 8,500 people with a 2006 population of 240,500.
Cookeville added 6,525 with a 2006 population of 99,942.
Crossville added 5,542 with a 2006 population of 52,344.
Greeneville added 3,036 with a 2006 population of 65,945.
Johnson City added 9,529 people with a 2006 population of 191,136.
Kingsport-Bristol added 3,867 people with a 2006 population of 302,451.
Knoxville added 51,305 people with a 2006 population of 667,384.
Memphis added 69,500 people with a 2006 population of 1,274,704
Nashville added 143,308 people with a 2006 population of 1,455,097.
Sevierville* added 10,212 people with a 2006 population of 81,382.

*Sevierville used to be part of the Knoxville metro area, but now it's its own micropolitan area.

The fastest-growing metro area in the country? ATLANTA. Between 2000 and 2006 Atlanta added 890,242 to its metro area and has a 2006 population of 5,138,223, which is double the growth experienced in South Florida which added 456,293 people for a 2006 total of 5,463,857. Another reason I'm glad I don't live in Atlanta anymore. Or South Florida.

That also means Atlanta is now the 9th largest metropolitan area in the country; since 2000 it surpassed Detroit and Boston. And if not for immigrants moving in, Boston and New York would've shrunk in population since 2000.
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Old 04-06-2007, 03:23 PM
 
2,060 posts, read 5,004,993 times
Reputation: 1427
Thats the problem with folks these days, they cant handle the truth. Now, I'm not here to discourage anyone from moving, it's a free country, do what ya'll want. Like I mentioned before, one of my best friends moved here from NY State with $400.00 in his pocket and a sack of clothes. Its worked out great for him, but it always doesnt work out for families who have children in school and are use to living a certain way, different from how we live.

Braves fan, trust me- I know exactly where you are coming from. My family has been/still lives in East TN. We have been there since before the revolutionary war. So in many ways, my family has been there since before TN was even a state. They didn't even leave the East TN region. I'm the only person to have left and live in another state. 2 actually- one on the east coast and now out in Cali. I think that after being out of TN for 10 years, I've grown to appreciate what TN was and is. I also know that I dislike many things about the areas I've lived. Some are touted as world class, sophisticated cities. But I still don't like the vibe. Now that all these people from other states have essentially been screwed out of their own states, they're coming for one of the last regions of the country that remotely resembles middle class America. In the process, I hope they don't wash the culture away in a sea of suburban jungles.

So... there's really nothing that can be done about it. The word is out, and here they come. I've been not so thrilled about it either. But look at it this way: the southern economy is healthy and growing. Despite all the people moving in, the state is still about 95% rural and sparsely populated. lastly- the housing bubble that forced a lot of people out of their states is over and within a few years, things will get back to normal. So a lot of people might start staying put. Either way, people are going to keep producing children, and as long as they do, people will need places to live. I've had to accept the fact that the South will not be the same again. It might help just to accept it.
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Old 04-06-2007, 04:11 PM
 
2,060 posts, read 5,004,993 times
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one more thing: If you want to feel better, at least we aren't TX or NC- yet. I can tell you that the HOT words for Californians out here seem to be two places: Austin TX, and Raleigh, NC.TN is still kind of off the radar, but I feel people in LA like Nashville because of the similarities between them: both have 'stars'. More specifically, the whole state of TX seems to be getting inundated with them. Makes me nervous that TN is right next to GA and NC.
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Old 04-06-2007, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Chattanooga
2,071 posts, read 6,814,608 times
Reputation: 523
Do you think people in the Idaho forum worry about this kind of stuff?
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Old 04-06-2007, 07:55 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, Tennessee
22,533 posts, read 46,075,513 times
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Yeah. Actually, they do. Boise is considered HOT right now, and has a lot of Californian transplants. My stepbrother lives there. He moved from FLORIDA. Prices are skyrocketing.

Apparently, you did not know that.
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Old 04-06-2007, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Chattanooga
2,071 posts, read 6,814,608 times
Reputation: 523
Everyday I find out about stuff I didn't know....
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Old 04-06-2007, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, Tennessee
22,533 posts, read 46,075,513 times
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Somehow, I don't think this enlightenment really will affect you.

But throwing out the Idaho statement, well, there is a whole world beyond Florida and Tennessee, and according to the last news reports I read, Idaho is hotter than Tennnessee.
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Old 04-07-2007, 04:53 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
33,949 posts, read 32,385,955 times
Reputation: 49901
Quote:
Originally Posted by mbmouse View Post
Just to add to your great post. The Johnson City figures also include some annexing that happened last year. Pinney Flats and about 3 more square miles worth of Gray.
I just looked at my future TN town on that site that shall remain nameless but it is the January 2007 update and it is still showing zero growth (similar number of people moving in and out, I guess) which is fine by me. I still like population density figures to decide where I like to be but those only work if you know the population density of where you live now so you can judge if it will seem more or less crowded where you are going compared to where you live now.
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Old 04-07-2007, 05:39 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
33,949 posts, read 32,385,955 times
Reputation: 49901
Quote:
Originally Posted by hiknapster View Post
Somehow, I don't think this enlightenment really will affect you.

But throwing out the Idaho statement, well, there is a whole world beyond Florida and Tennessee, and according to the last news reports I read, Idaho is hotter than Tennnessee.
Until we get time travel I'm thinking, generally speaking, people will prefer relocation destinations not too far from family and friends. I'm thinking that's why many Floridians chose NC over TN. They want to be closer to the I-95 corridor so they can easily go to NY/NJ/CT or back to Florida. In the Idaho example, you probably see more people from the west coast moving there. You know, it's hot for them but not so hot for Floridians.

It will be interesting to see migration patterns in the 2010 census. You would think the impact of the Internet and E-Mail would have some impact on increasing the number of relocating people compared to the 2000 census since it's both easier to research a new location and once you move, communicate (e-mail, photo-sharing, etc.) with friends and family. My opinion is that will make people less timid about moving out of state.

Also, I believe I read somewhere that the single population is growing. Being single makes it easier to just pick up and move compared to when you have a family.
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Old 04-07-2007, 06:39 AM
 
197 posts, read 934,185 times
Reputation: 55
C'mon LauraC, tell us....tell us the name of your future home city....I will not tell anyone :-) :-) just kidding.....I bet you found a little piece of heaven, haven't you ? By the way, where do you live today ? TriCities ?
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