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Old 04-13-2007, 03:21 PM
 
17 posts, read 98,872 times
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I am interested in relocating to either Tennessee or Kentucky this summer - I am retiring early - so employment is not a big issue. However I am interested in knowing the differences between TN and KY - they seem very similar - but then I am 900 miles away and trying to judge through the internet. I have visited Pigeon Forge - and other then the Smokies I was very disappointed - way to built up for tourism.


I want to feel comfortable being a single woman in her late 40's who has transplanted herself down there. I like the idea of living in a small town - any suggestions about one in either state that is good to move to would be appreciated.

and from what I have seen both are beautiful states - which just makes this decision so difficult!
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Old 04-13-2007, 03:43 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
6,290 posts, read 20,548,170 times
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That's a tough one. I think of Tennesse and Kentucky as sister states, however, there are slight differences in the weather, the governments, the topgraphy, etc.

Eastern Kentucky is quite a bit difference than eastern Tennessee because of the dependence on coal mining in Kentucky. There is coal mining in Tennessee too, but not to the extend there is in Kentucky. It made that part of Kentucky poorer than other areas.

I'm not sure what to tell you. There are some nice small towns in Kentucky, and some nice small towns in Tennesse. Heck, you could split the difference and live somewhere along the border.

What are your interests? Nature? Both have that. Horses? Kentucky is the center of horse breeding in the US. Music? Tennessee is very big on that. Art? Crafts? Fishing? Boating?

By the way, Gatlinburg and Pigeon Forge are very much built up for tourism, but that's just two towns among many in East Tennessee.
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Old 04-13-2007, 03:50 PM
 
11,603 posts, read 31,771,782 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smswkpk View Post
I am interested in relocating to either Tennessee or Kentucky this summer - I am retiring early - so employment is not a big issue. However I am interested in knowing the differences between TN and KY - they seem very similar - but then I am 900 miles away and trying to judge through the internet. I have visited Pigeon Forge - and other then the Smokies I was very disappointed - way to built up for tourism.


I want to feel comfortable being a single woman in her late 40's who has transplanted herself down there. I like the idea of living in a small town - any suggestions about one in either state that is good to move to would be appreciated.

and from what I have seen both are beautiful states - which just makes this decision so difficult!
I understand you about Pigeon Forge! I can't stand going over there anymore.

What kind of living situation do you want? Are you looking for land? Do you want to live right in a town, or out in the country? What are some hobbies you have that you will want to continue after your retirement?

Tennessee has a lower over-all tax burden than Kentucky, and it doesn't snow quite as much in Tennessee as in Kentucky, particularly northern Kentucky.

I see you that you said you are interested in the Cookeville area, and that is understandable. It's a beautiful area, just over an hour away from Nashville, and is very popular with young retirees. (It's my personal choice.)

The Tri Cities area of NE TN (Bristol, Johnson City, and Kingsport) is also becoming a popular area. Many people in this forum are either retiring to the Tri Cities or are thinking about it, and for good reason. It's a beautiful area.

Since you're still young, I assume you are not interested in living in a retirement development where the average age is 60+. Is that right?

I think one of the advantages Tennessee has over Kentucky, other than the milder climate and the lower taxes, is that because Tennessee has 5 metropolitan areas with at least a half-million people, you're rarely more than an hour or so away from a metropolitan area. So it's possible to live in a small town and still be reasonably close to a larger city.

Anyway, fill us in on some of the things you're looking for specifically in a retirement area (golf courses? education opportunities? culture? outdoor activities? tax rates?) and we'll be glad to help!
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Old 04-13-2007, 04:32 PM
 
17 posts, read 98,872 times
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Thanks for the replies. I am interested in nature exploration - kayaking, walking/hiking in the hills - I do like the idea of being in a smaller town - city life is not for me. I am also concerned about the weather - looking forward to getting away from the cold in CT - and am hoping neither KY or TN are not too humid in the summer - expecting too much, I know. I appreciate your help - the more I read about the cookeville area the more desirable it sounds. But I will have to check out the tri-city area too. - what a tough decision!
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Old 04-13-2007, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Beautiful East TN!!
7,281 posts, read 18,703,493 times
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Hi smswkpk,
If you like walking/hiking in the hills as well as mountain water sports, I would also suggest Tri-Cities, maybe south of Johnson City for you. Close to the mountains for that and yet close to city for amenities with out being in the city. You may even like Greeneville better. There are a BUNCH of threads several pages back about all of these towns that have some great info and even some pictures. I just posted more pics of JC today.
I was born and raised in CT so I do understand where you are coming from weather wise. Northern East TN is MUCH better winter and summer, much more enjoyable, but that is my opinion.
Hope that helps!
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Old 04-13-2007, 05:10 PM
 
17 posts, read 98,872 times
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that definitely helps - I will look back several pages and see if I can find the threads - but first I will look at your pics.

Thanks
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Old 04-13-2007, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
33,949 posts, read 32,379,274 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smswkpk View Post
I like the idea of living in a small town - any suggestions about one in either state that is good to move to would be appreciated.
Just to make sure everyone is on the same page with you, what size town do you consider to be a small town? Cookeville has a population of about 25,000 now. Do you think that's a small town? I would never call that a small town but someone from Boston or Detroit, for example, might call it small.

This City Data website spilts the towns up from populations of 6,000 and over, 1,000 - 6,000 and less than 1,000.

My observation is the categories small, medium and large ascribed by posters in these forums depend on the size of the place they come from, so, you have to be more specific. How big is a small town to you (so people can give you the best advice)?
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Old 04-13-2007, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
14,506 posts, read 23,180,936 times
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Smile interesting-

Quote:
Originally Posted by smswkpk View Post
Thanks for the replies. I am interested in nature exploration - kayaking, walking/hiking in the hills - I do like the idea of being in a smaller town - city life is not for me. I am also concerned about the weather - looking forward to getting away from the cold in CT - and am hoping neither KY or TN are not too humid in the summer - expecting too much, I know. I appreciate your help - the more I read about the cookeville area the more desirable it sounds. But I will have to check out the tri-city area too. - what a tough decision!
what I love about this forum is everyone is so different. I learn something new everyday. We have lived here almost 3 years. Drove through Tenn, Kentucky through Ohio and Indiana to Illinois. There are nice sections everywhere. Summers are hot. Lexington in June is VERY hot.

I would research and drive through areas you are interested in. That is really the best way to know for sure how you feel. JMO.

sunny
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Old 04-14-2007, 08:25 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
6,290 posts, read 20,548,170 times
Reputation: 1666
Quote:
Originally Posted by smswkpk View Post
Thanks for the replies. I am interested in nature exploration - kayaking, walking/hiking in the hills - I do like the idea of being in a smaller town - city life is not for me. I am also concerned about the weather - looking forward to getting away from the cold in CT - and am hoping neither KY or TN are not too humid in the summer - expecting too much, I know. I appreciate your help - the more I read about the cookeville area the more desirable it sounds. But I will have to check out the tri-city area too. - what a tough decision!
It does get a little warm down here in July and August, but it is a little cooler in the high elevations, East Tennessee or along the Cumberland Plateau.

I'll offer one idea for your consideration. Monteagle (or Sewanee). It's between Nashville and Chatanooga right off of I-65. There are lakes and parks within a short drive and the weather may be a little more to your liking than around the Nashville area. Then, if you want to go shopping in a bigger town once or twice a year, you can go to Nashville or Chatanooga in a couple of hours.
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Old 04-14-2007, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Seattle
6,486 posts, read 13,781,482 times
Reputation: 2764
I echo MBmouse for Northeast TN / Tri-Cities metro or closer to Greeneville, all within 45-55 minutes of each other. You have the plusses of a semi-large city (The Tri-Cities metro has, collectively, what, 500,000 people?) but in the same area tremendously rural swathes of land.

Personally, I know that Greene co. has some great spelunking opportunites in the Cedar Creek area, some great hiking areas (including Appalachian Trail) on Bald and Viking Mountains, and there are several kayaking / whitewater rafting outfits operating near Erwin in Unicoi (not sure exactly what county this is, ha...)

Plus, if you truly need something out of the big-city (like seeing Ben Harper in concert, which I did.... swoon) there's Knoxville within 1-1:30 hours, Asheville within the hour, and Chattanooga within a couple. Nashville is about 3-4 hours away (depending on how you drive) with its large airport.
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