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Old 04-21-2007, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Another Day Closer
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I was just wondering. I have read several posts here that talk about the summers being hot and humid. I've read that temps are in the 90's in July and August. It's in the 90's here in July and August as well. We also have the "Dog Days" of august Is it that the humidity makes it feel even hotter? I'm not being sarcastic I just want to know if the summer temps are about the same as they are here or if there is something that makes it seem hotter further south. I haven't been down there in the summer although I plan to be down in August for just that reason. It sounds like the temp ranges are about the same as they are here except for the winter when it can be below zero for weeks.
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Old 04-21-2007, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Hometown of Jason Witten
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Generally, the farther west you go in Tennessee the hotter it is. I've never been to New England, but if the summer humidity is as bad there as it is in Maryland and New Jersey, I would have to say that Tennessee is a bit more comfortable. But in either case, the humidity is only oppressive for three or four months.
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Old 04-21-2007, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Another Day Closer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridgerunner View Post
Generally, the farther west you go in Tennessee the hotter it is. I've never been to New England, but if the summer humidity is as bad there as it is in Maryland and New Jersey, I would have to say that Tennessee is a bit more comfortable. But in either case, the humidity is only oppressive for three or four months.
Thanks. We only have oppressive humidity here for about a month in August. So it may be for longer but at least I'm used to it. We're fairly close to the coast (about an hour away) So that helps some. I guess I'll find out when I come down this summer. Thanks again
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Old 04-21-2007, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
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Well, it can get to 100 or above for a few days some years. And yes, the humidity is a factor. But again, this varies . . . one week it might be oppressively hot and humid, then the next week it might be mid-eighties (which will feel down-right pleasant by then).

I think air-conditioning has had an effect on all of us. When I was growing up, I played and worked outside all summer; we didn't even have air-conditioning until I was nine or ten. We were used to it. Now I live in an air-conditioned house, drive an air-conditioned car, work in an air-conditioned office. I've become an "old softy". :-(

And as one poster above mentioned, West Tennessee is very hot (or at least feel like it is), Middle Tennessee a little less so (but still hot), and East Tennessee and the Cumberland Plateau (with their higher elevations) somewhat cooler.

If you're coming in August (generally the hottest month of the year), assume it's going to be hot and humid. Wear light, light-colored clothes, and stay in the shade as much as possible when you're outside. Be weary of events while you have to be out in direct sun for long periods of time.

Last edited by alleycat; 04-21-2007 at 09:18 PM..
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Old 04-21-2007, 09:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by northcountrygirl View Post
Thanks. We only have oppressive humidity here for about a month in August. So it may be for longer but at least I'm used to it. We're fairly close to the coast (about an hour away) So that helps some. I guess I'll find out when I come down this summer. Thanks again
I agree with Ridgerunner and alleycat, it seems the farther west you go, the more humid it gets. Summers in Memphis are like summers in Bangladesh, I swear.

Generally, places like the Cumberland Plateau (Cookeville, Crossville) and the Tri Cities (Bristol, Johnson City, Kingsport) will have lower humidity because of their higher elevations. In fact, I think the Tri Cities area also has the lowest temperatures in Tennessee. Those who live there can correct me if I'm wrong, but it seems I rarely see the temps there get above 90. In the dog days of summer (July/August) there's probably not much of a difference from one region to another, but in June and September you'll really feel a difference.

I remember one summer, a friend from Mississippi was visiting me in Cookeville. People in Cookeville were bemoaning the high temps (low 90s) and high humidity. But to my friend from Mississippi, she thought it was very pleasant because the humidity in Mississippi was so much higher.
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Old 04-21-2007, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Another Day Closer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alleycat View Post
Well, it can get to 100 or above for a few days some years. And yes, the humidity is a factor. But again, this varies . . . one week it might be oppressively hot and humid, then the next week it might be mid-eighties (which will feel down-right pleasant by then).

I think air-conditioning has had an effect on all of us. When I was growing up, I played and worked outside all summer; we didn't even have air-conditioning until I was nine or ten. We were used to it. Now I live in an air-condition house, drive an air-conditioned car, work in an air-conditioned office. I've become an "old softy". :-(

And as one posted above mentioned, West Tennessee is very hot (or at least feel like it is), Middle Tennessee a little less so (but still hot), and East Tennessee and the Cumberland Plateau (with their higher elevations) somewhat cooler.

If you're coming in August (generally the hottest month of the year), assume it's going to be hot and humid. Wear light, light-colored clothes, and stay in the shade as much as possible when you're outside. Be weary of events while you have to be out in direct sun for long period of time.
Thank you. I'll remember that. We're planning on coming down in August for the express purpose of finding out what it's like in Tennesse in the hottest part of the year. We came down during the end of March so we've experienced some of your beautiful spring. Winter I'm not worried about as we're used to that. Now we want to see what it's like in the heat so there won't be any surprises. It sounds pretty much like what we have though. We've had it hit 100 here quite a few times in the summer. We have the seasons here too so we'll probably be fine. I agree with you about the air conditioning. I only have it in the bedroom at home but I work in it all day and about die when I come out of work. Of course my very black pickup sitting in the bright sun in the parking lot all day might have something to do with that Thanks for the tips
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Old 04-21-2007, 09:14 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
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My mother's family has a family reunion once a year. They used to have it the first Sunday in August . . . which just happened to be about the hottest day one could pick. I think they almost killed an old person or two so they moved it to September ("Hey, good choice. It's about time."). ;-)
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Old 04-21-2007, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Hometown of Jason Witten
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Really good points, JMT & Alleycat. I live in the Tri-Cities and there is often a 10-degree difference in temperature from here to Memphis. But that same difference also occurs during the winter.
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Old 04-21-2007, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Hometown of Jason Witten
5,985 posts, read 3,640,122 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alleycat View Post
Well, it can get to 100 or above for a few days some years. And yes, the humidity is a factor. But again, this varies . . . one week it might be oppressively hot and humid, then the next week it might be mid-eighties (which will feel down-right pleasant by then).

I think air-conditioning has had an effect on all of us. When I was growing up, I played and worked outside all summer; we didn't even have air-conditioning until I was nine or ten. We were used to it. Now I live in an air-conditioned house, drive an air-conditioned car, work in an air-conditioned office. I've become an "old softy". :-(

And as one poster above mentioned, West Tennessee is very hot (or at least feel like it is), Middle Tennessee a little less so (but still hot), and East Tennessee and the Cumberland Plateau (with their higher elevations) somewhat cooler.

If you're coming in August (generally the hottest month of the year), assume it's going to be hot and humid. Wear light, light-colored clothes, and stay in the shade as much as possible when you're outside. Be weary of events while you have to be out in direct sun for long periods of time.
Alleycat, your comments remind me of when I was a student housing coordinator in South Florida. Some of the kids from places like Colorado and Wyoming could barely tolerate the heat. Some of them, although from well-to-do families, had never lived in air conditioning and didn't know how to operate the central air controls.
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Old 04-21-2007, 10:01 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
6,290 posts, read 20,548,170 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridgerunner View Post
Alleycat, your comments remind me of when I was a student housing coordinator in South Florida. Some of the kids from places like Colorado and Wyoming could barely tolerate the heat. Some of them, although from well-to-do families, had never lived in air conditioning and didn't know how to operate the central air controls.
My favorite story about something like that is a friend I had from Utah. She moved to Tennessee in the winter. She wanted to know where our "swamp coolers" were. We had to ask what she was talking about. She explained that they added humidity to the air in summer. They needed them in the dry western summers.

We got a good chuckle about that. "Righttttt . . . we want to add humidity to the air in summer here . . . "
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